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Re: Egg Question

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  • Kataryna Dragonweaver
    Did the lard work? I would love the info on medieval fats. Thanks Jadwiga! -Kataryna
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 30, 2008
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      Did the lard work?
      I would love the info on medieval fats.
      Thanks Jadwiga!
      -Kataryna

      --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, jenne@... wrote:
      >
      > When I did this, I did it with lard.
      >
      > Jaella of Armida did some research on medieval fats for the Oxford
      > Symposium on food, I could ask her about it-- shall I?
      >
      > -- Jadwiga
      >
      > > Thanks,
      > > <head desk> for that idea.
      > >
      > > Anyone have any idea on what I could try next...
      > >
      > > Stuff I've tried:
      > > Beef Suet - heated until molten, dipped egg - the whole egg turns
      > > red from vingar.
      > > Beef Suet - warmed in the sun, and about the consistancy of butter,
      > > slathered on egg - blotches of red but no 'graven images'... nothing
      > > that could remotely be called an image.
      > > Beef Suet - warmed, placed on egg, placed outside in the cold of
      > > winter - same as above.
      > > Lamb Suet - ditto
      > > Suet specifically gotten from beneath the tail of the lamb because
      > > it is waxier in nature (found when I looked up the English
      > > definition of Suet in a 1700's dictionary), warmed - a bit better
      > > then the warm beef stuff - but still nothing that could be
      > > considered an image.
      > > Beeswax - image, but the wax certianly doesn't come off in warm
      > > water.
      > > Beeswax and suet mixed, containing mostly wax - works like beeswax.
      > >
      > > I haven't tried with any actual tallows - but if someone has a
      > > better suggestion of what Plat might be talking about in terms of
      > > Suet I'd be happy to entertain it.
      > > -Kataryna
      > > PS: anyone have a recipe for tallow candles?
      > >
      > > --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, Marilee Humason <stasiwa@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >> As far as my research has taken me, suet is as it is
      > >> today and no, Tallow is not suet, it is rendered fat.
      > >> stasi
      > >> --- Susan Koziel <kataryna_dragonweaver@>
      > >> wrote:
      > >>
      > >> > Hi all,
      > >> > I'm going back over all my egg decoration
      > >> > information, and I was re-checking all my
      > >> > experiments
      > >> > with Hugh Plat's acid etching description and I have
      > >> > a
      > >> > question... well two actually:
      > >> >
      > >> > 1) Quoting Hugh Plat:
      > >> > "hen lay this eg thus engraved in good wine vinegar
      > >> > or
      > >> > strong alliger in a Glasse or stone Pottinger, for
      > >> > some six or eight houres, or more, or lesse,
      > >> > according
      > >> > to the strength and sharpnesse of the Vinegar, then
      > >> > take out the egge"
      > >> > .... What is alliger?
      > >> >
      > >> > 2) Suet as I know it (molten fat, then hardened and
      > >> > cooled) doesn't work - it actually doesn't work if
      > >> > it's "molten" as described in the method. If applied
      > >> > while cool (and thick enough) it doesn't hold the
      > >> > engraving very well and you get blobs not pictures.
      > >> > Molten bees wax works lovely and makes clear images.
      > >> > (But certainly doesn't dissolve "in water that is
      > >> > blood warme")
      > >> > In the 1500's did suet mean something other then
      > >> > what
      > >> > it means now?
      > >> > Were Suet and Tallow exchangeable term?
      > >> > (Tallow - a mix of Suet and wax might work - but I
      > >> > haven't tried it.)
      > >> >
      > >> > Any help people can be would be great.
      > >> > Thanks.
      > >> > -Kataryna
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Baroness Anastasia Alexandrovna Andreeva (OL)
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      > -- Jenne Heise / Jadwiga Zajaczkowa
      > jenne@...
      >
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