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Re: Re[2]: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...

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  • aldo
    Not really. Many Soviet scientists have done their work sincerely and punctiliously and their written works have not been published in the places where they
    Message 1 of 45 , Jan 18, 2008
      Not really. Many Soviet scientists have done their work sincerely and punctiliously and their written works have not been published in the places where they should but did not disappear tho and therefore cannot be rejected wholesale as here in Italy historians do (I regret however that there are no Italian historians who can read Russian!!!).The work is just on the onset and there are still many things to revise or revisit and many mistakes may be done in this process. However I believe firmly in one thing. A specialist is nod godship who knows and keeps everything for himself. Here in Italy where the first Universities have been founded some principles have been preserved in this direction tho we are a subalternate society now. Among these principles there is one: The first duty of a scholar or of researcher is to inform the others on his arguments and subjects but not the other specialists. Those WHO ARE NOT SPECIALISTS must be taught and the specialist is required to make himself understood BY EVERYBODY.

      Aldo
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: LiudmilaV@...
      To: sig@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, January 18, 2008 7:46 PM
      Subject: Re: Re[2]: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...



      Since I am not a historian other than as a hobby, would you be kind enough to look up a quote I am asking for? Not urgently, by any means.? I think I have access to some of the books you mentioned, and will go dig in now -- hooray for a vacation from psychology :) Not that I don't like psychology...

      As for the revision, I am aware of it and I think it is great that it is happening. My concern is with biases: Soviet works were certainly biased, but I notice a bias in a different direction in many modern works as well. What is your professional opinion on the matter? Is all Soviet-researched history to be thrown out? Is all modern work to be accepted wholesale?

      -----Original Message-----
      From: aldo <turanomar@...>
      To: sig@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 10:31 am
      Subject: Re: Re[2]: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...

      OK, I am an historian but I am a specialist of the Russian Middle Ages too and since there is a deep revision of the old Sovietic Historiography I am well and deeply involved in it.

      U can find about the Skomorohi in the classical

      A.A. Korinfskii - Narodnaya Rus

      and

      M. Zabylin - Russkii Narod

      and also in Ivanov - Mify Narodov Mira but there are also many articles that I cannot list here.

      Aldo

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: LiudmilaV@...

      To: sig@yahoogroups.com

      Sent: Friday, January 18, 2008 7:28 PM

      Subject: Re: Re[2]: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...

      I have not heard such because I have little interest in the subject, ordinarily, I am afraid. But what you are saying is exactly my issue -- substantiation of the claim. I am a scientist by profession, in a field that demands experimental research to validate a theory, so I may be too picky here.

      Liudmila

      -----Original Message-----

      From: Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik <Posadnik@...>

      To: sig@yahoogroups.com

      Sent: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 10:20 am

      Subject: Re[2]: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...

      Greetings!

      ???????????

      It is a VERY old theory, surprised you never heard such. Linguistically, this

      explanation of POSSIBLE "forbidden true name of the bear" is correct, but no

      evidence that Rus really meant "Bear land" is yet given.

      -----Original Message-----

      From: LiudmilaV@...

      To: sig@yahoogroups.com

      Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 13:04:01 -0500

      Subject: Re: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...

      >

      >

      > Personally, I would decline to have an opinion until I read the book and see

      for myself whether it is indeed well documented. In the recent years, a large

      number of publications were produced in Russia that are rather low in

      scholarship but make sometimes outrageous claims. Next time I will be ordering

      from ozon.ru, I will get that book as well unless any of the Russian book stores

      in LA carry it.

      >

      > Liudmila

      >

      >

      >

      >

      > -----Original Message-----

      > From: aldo <turanomar@...>

      > To: sig@yahoogroups.com

      > Sent: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 9:44 am

      > Subject: Re: [sig] possibly obscure Russian question...

      >

      > I would like to add to this topic the following. Lately has been publiashed in

      Russia a very well-made research on the cult and rites concerning the Bear in

      the North of the European and Asiatic continent (LEONTEV & LEONTEV). The

      research was aimed to conclude that the name RUS' is nothing more than the old

      Russian (but disappeared because tabooized) name of the BEAR.Presently in the

      Slavic and Slavo-Baltic languages the BEAR is called HE WHO KNOWS WHERE THE

      HONEY IS or MEDVED' while in the Germanic languages it appears as the

      BROWN-COLORED ONE (Bear etc.). In the the restant IE languages it appears as

      URSUS/ARCTOS/ARTOS/RKS'AS/RSUS/ROKS and therefore the hypothesis is very

      interesting and, in my opinion, very reliable and close to the truth!

      >

      > What d'u think?

      >

      >

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    • aldo
      U re right. The Bear Academy was located in the present-day Belarus in the town of SMORGON not far from Vilnius. It was one of the sponsored activities of the
      Message 45 of 45 , Jan 27, 2008
        U're right. The Bear Academy was located in the present-day Belarus in the town of SMORGON not far from Vilnius. It was one of the sponsored activities of the Radziwill family's.
        Ciao

        Aldo
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: S. Butler
        To: sig@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2008 9:01 AM
        Subject: [sig] Re: possibly obscure Russian question...



        I'm separated from my books, but I remember that Poland had a long
        history of training performing bears. I think one of the more standard
        books even mentioned a bear-training academy.

        If bears are portrayed as slow, clumsy, and/or stupid in folklore, it is
        either by people who didn't know bears very well, or just a playful
        literary license (in the same way we portray bears as cuddly 'Teddy
        Bears' or lions in 'The Lion King.') Bears are very intelligent (ask
        any park ranger out west), and can move _very_ quickly over short
        distances.

        Leszek/Steve
        --

        --





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