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Re: any information on süvegcsúcs?

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  • Andreas Van Hassen
    I m not sure about them being Viking. I ve been finding them in the 10th century Magyar/Õsmagyarok research that I have been doing. I have seen them in
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 20, 2007
      I'm not sure about them being Viking. I've been finding them in the
      10th century Magyar/Õsmagyarok research that I have been doing. I
      have seen them in different sizes. Many in the same as to the Viking
      ones, but I have also seen larger ones.

      http://istvandr.kiszely.hu/ostortenet/036.html

      http://members.chello.hu/divat/tortelem/honfog3.htm






      --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, wheezul@... wrote:
      >
      > So do you think they are like the Viking cap toppers that Norse-ski
      An
      > Tirians put on top of a santa-type hat?
      >
      > Katherine
      >
    • Tim Nalley
      Not Ost Vik. Not even Maoskevja Balka. More like Khazar. The belt is very similar to Khazar belts from gravegoods depicted on Red Kaganate. Can anyone read
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 20, 2007
        Not Ost Vik. Not even Maoskevja Balka. More like
        Khazar. The belt is very similar to Khazar belts from
        gravegoods depicted on Red Kaganate.

        Can anyone read Hungarian? I would love to read the
        section labled Magyar Ember detailing genetic markers?
        A girlfriend of past days from Cleveland was Hungarian
        and Italian descent. The really interesting thing
        about her was the faint blue smudge at the base of her
        spine. Not a birthmark, more like a washed out, faded
        ink blot about the size of a quarter. She called it
        her "thumbprint". Anyone ever heard of this?
        'dok
        --- Andreas Van Hassen <adhazen1974@...> wrote:

        > I'm not sure about them being Viking. I've been
        > finding them in the
        > 10th century Magyar/Õsmagyarok research that I have
        > been doing. I
        > have seen them in different sizes. Many in the same
        > as to the Viking
        > ones, but I have also seen larger ones.
        >
        > http://istvandr.kiszely.hu/ostortenet/036.html
        >
        > http://members.chello.hu/divat/tortelem/honfog3.htm
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, wheezul@... wrote:
        > >
        > > So do you think they are like the Viking cap
        > toppers that Norse-ski
        > An
        > > Tirians put on top of a santa-type hat?
        > >
        > > Katherine
        > >
        >
        >
        >



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      • L.M. Kies
        ... Yes, I ve heard of it. It sounds like a Mongolian spot , although they usually disappear in childhood. Over 99% are in children of Asiatic or Amerindian
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 20, 2007
          >------- Original Message -------
          >A girlfriend of past days from Cleveland was Hungarian
          >and Italian descent. The really interesting thing
          >about her was the faint blue smudge at the base of her
          >spine... Anyone ever heard of this?

          Yes, I've heard of it. It sounds like a "Mongolian spot", although they usually disappear in childhood. Over 99% are in children of Asiatic or Amerindian descent, rarely in blacks, very rarely in whites. Which makes it extra interesting given her Hungarian ancestry. :-)

          Sofya



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • wheezul@canby.com
          Not a birthmark, more like a washed out, faded ... It s called a tungusic spot and can be found on people of mongolic descent and in some Native American
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 20, 2007
            Not a birthmark, more like a washed out, faded
            > ink blot about the size of a quarter. She called it
            > her "thumbprint". Anyone ever heard of this?
            > 'dok

            It's called a tungusic spot and can be found on people of mongolic descent
            and in some Native American tribes. I hope I have spelled it correctly -
            it has been a long time since I took that course in college :D

            Katherine
          • wheezul@canby.com
            ... Some of our East German family has some of the other genetic markers including the tooth and nail shape. We figure that there may have been some influence
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 20, 2007
              >
              >>------- Original Message -------
              >>A girlfriend of past days from Cleveland was Hungarian
              >>and Italian descent. The really interesting thing
              >>about her was the faint blue smudge at the base of her
              >>spine... Anyone ever heard of this?
              >
              > Yes, I've heard of it. It sounds like a "Mongolian spot", although they
              > usually disappear in childhood. Over 99% are in children of Asiatic or
              > Amerindian descent, rarely in blacks, very rarely in whites. Which makes
              > it extra interesting given her Hungarian ancestry. :-)
              >
              > Sofya

              Some of our East German family has some of the other genetic markers
              including the tooth and nail shape. We figure that there may have been
              some influence from the constant 'tartar' invasions in the area.

              Katherine
            • bphall76@aol.com
              mongolian spots can also occur in peoples of southern European descent. My sister had one when she was born and it took a lot of convincing that a: she is
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 20, 2007
                "mongolian spots" can also occur in peoples of southern European descent.
                My sister had one when she was born and it took a lot of convincing that a:
                she is my father's daughter. and b: that my mother was not harming her.
                Finally my mother told the doctors that part of my dad's family was from Italy.
                (Now an Italian speaking part of Switzerland) They (the doctors) accepted
                that as a possible reason.

                Genetics is so weird
                Vasilisa



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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tim Nalley
                Thanks! It was more of a faint smudge. If she hadn t been so set against tanning I probably would have missed it entirely. I knew I had heard something along
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 24, 2007
                  Thanks! It was more of a faint smudge. If she hadn't
                  been so set against tanning I probably would have
                  missed it entirely. I knew I had heard something along
                  those lines somewhere but I couldn't remember where.
                  Thanks!
                  'dok
                  --- wheezul@... wrote:

                  > Not a birthmark, more like a washed out, faded
                  > > ink blot about the size of a quarter. She called
                  > it
                  > > her "thumbprint". Anyone ever heard of this?
                  > > 'dok
                  >
                  > It's called a tungusic spot and can be found on
                  > people of mongolic descent
                  > and in some Native American tribes. I hope I have
                  > spelled it correctly -
                  > it has been a long time since I took that course in
                  > college :D
                  >
                  > Katherine
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >



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