Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

rus fitted dress

Expand Messages
  • Shannon Anderson
    I just lucked out at a great fabric sale... $5 a yard 60 wide silks. Now, I m trying to get some dresses cranked out (as are many of you, I m sure) before
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 13 1:37 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      I just lucked out at a great fabric sale... $5 a yard 60" wide silks. Now, I'm trying to get some dresses cranked out (as are many of you, I'm sure) before heading "home" to Pennsic.

      I have found this very nice figure in an illuminated O from the "Master of the Willehalm Romance: The Meeting of Malifer and Penthesilea" by Wolfram von Eschenbach c. 1385, Prague. Penthesilea is wearing a dress that very clearly has lacing up the front and is fitted.

      This the closest I've found to anything even remotely not-a-drapey-tunic within 100 years of my persona date within the Slavic world. It probably doesn't even count because the story is German, I think. Does anyone have *anything* that suggests any other types of fitting in Rus 12-13th cent. women's dress?

      This might be a lost cause. All vague references to waist created with anything other than a belt seem to be Western influence, later period.

      Margarita


      ---------------------------------
      Take the Internet to Go: Yahoo!Go puts the Internet in your pocket: mail, news, photos & more.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • L.M. Kies
      Margarita, poklon ot Sofya! ... Congratulations! ... Well, you might recall that recent discussion of the Izyaslavl/Toroptsa dress/svita/navershnik/jacket. It
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 13 6:02 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Margarita, poklon ot Sofya!

        >
        >I just lucked out at a great fabric sale... $5 a yard 60" wide silks.

        Congratulations!

        >I have found this very nice figure in an illuminated O ... c. 1385, Prague. ...wearing a dress that very
        >clearly has lacing up the front and is fitted.... Does anyone have *anything* that suggests any other
        >types of fitting in Rus 12-13th cent. women's dress?

        Well, you might recall that recent discussion of the Izyaslavl/Toroptsa dress/svita/navershnik/jacket. It has a waist seam and a slightly gathered short skirt. So that would be *something* suggesting a different type of fitting in 12-13th cent. Rus women's dress.

        But not actually fitted, not laced. No graceful, figure-hugging hourglass cotehardies. That's a lost cause.
        I just gave mine to my sister. :-P

        Sofya

        --------------------------------------------------------------------
        Lisa M. Kies, MD aka Lady Sofya la Rus
        Mason City, IA aka Shire of Heraldshill, Calontir
        http://www.strangelove.net/~kieser
        "Si no necare, sana." "Mir znachit Pax Romanov"
        --------------------------------------------------------------------




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sfandra
        ... LOL! That s so funny, I gave my one kirtle and one cotehardie to my sister too! --Sfandra ****************** Posadnitsa Sfandra Dmitrieva iz Chernigova
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 13 6:16 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          >
          > But not actually fitted, not laced. No graceful,
          > figure-hugging hourglass cotehardies. That's a lost
          > cause.
          > I just gave mine to my sister. :-P
          >
          > Sofya
          >

          LOL! That's so funny, I gave my one kirtle and one
          cotehardie to my sister too!

          --Sfandra

          ******************
          Posadnitsa Sfandra Dmitrieva iz Chernigova
          KOE, Maunche, Apprentice to Maitresse Irene LeNoir
          Haus Von Drakenklaue
          Kingdom of the East
          ******************
          Never 'pearl' your butt.



          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          It's here! Your new message!
          Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
          http://tools.search.yahoo.com/toolbar/features/mail/
        • Marilee Humason
          I am afraid you aren t going to find anything because the idea was a static figure,no shape. Everyone looked the same and women were evil according to the
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 13 7:12 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            I am afraid you aren't going to find anything because
            the idea was a "static" figure,no shape. Everyone
            looked the same and women were "evil" according to the
            religion, so they weren't allowed to "tempt" men in
            any way. That is also why they were secluded in the
            later centuries and not allowed to be with any man
            other than their husband and immediate family, they
            were not to be trusted! Gotta love religions mostly
            created by men!
            Anastasia
            --- Shannon Anderson <kitonlove@...> wrote:

            > I just lucked out at a great fabric sale... $5 a
            > yard 60" wide silks. Now, I'm trying to get some
            > dresses cranked out (as are many of you, I'm sure)
            > before heading "home" to Pennsic.
            >
            > I have found this very nice figure in an illuminated
            > O from the "Master of the Willehalm Romance: The
            > Meeting of Malifer and Penthesilea" by Wolfram von
            > Eschenbach c. 1385, Prague. Penthesilea is wearing a
            > dress that very clearly has lacing up the front and
            > is fitted.
            >
            > This the closest I've found to anything even
            > remotely not-a-drapey-tunic within 100 years of my
            > persona date within the Slavic world. It probably
            > doesn't even count because the story is German, I
            > think. Does anyone have *anything* that suggests any
            > other types of fitting in Rus 12-13th cent. women's
            > dress?
            >
            > This might be a lost cause. All vague references to
            > waist created with anything other than a belt seem
            > to be Western influence, later period.
            >
            > Margarita
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Take the Internet to Go: Yahoo!Go puts the Internet
            > in your pocket: mail, news, photos & more.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            >
            >


            Baroness Anastasia Alexandrovna Andreeva (OL)
          • L.M. Kies
            ... I was always under the impression that such severe attitudes about women were confined to the rantings of monastic extremists, and not truly representative
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 13 1:04 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              > women were "evil" according to the
              >religion, so they weren't allowed to "tempt" men in
              >any way.

              I was always under the impression that such severe attitudes about women were confined to the rantings of monastic extremists, and not truly representative of Russian culture as a whole. After all, maidens were allowed to show their hair and women wore all sorts of pretty, tempting things.

              And while Russian garments are often described as "static" by authors, I find it much easier to move in them than my old fitted kirtle, or my Elizabethan bodice. So whose clothing is actually static?

              When cut correctly, I think Russian clothing is rather graceful, and not "shapeless". But it's not surprising that authors who've been indoctrinated into Western-style clothing and modern tayloring techniques and the benefits of the reforms of Peter the Great may have trouble evaluating "old fashioned" Eastern-style clothing on its own merits without imposing their own biases and expectations.

              >That is also why they were secluded in the
              >later centuries and not allowed to be with any man
              >other than their husband and immediate family

              Actually, only the very upper levels of late period Russian society practiced the seclusion of the terem. They were the only ones with houses big enough to shut away the women. Although the women weren't really shut away. They had an important role to play in behind-the-scenes politics and networking with the women of other noble families. Politics was all about family connections, and it was the women who made the marriages that created those family connections. And if you read the Domostroi carefully, you will see that the "secluded" mistress of the house was expected to supervise her servants and staff - including men, and there are other examples of the role of women in the Domostroi that clearly expect them to interact to some extent with men outside their "immediate family".

              So the seclusion of women could hardly be a religious/moral requirement if less than 5% of society could attempt it, and even that 5% didn't follow it perfectly.

              Just some thoughts,

              Sofya

              --------------------------------------------------------------------
              Lisa M. Kies, MD aka Lady Sofya la Rus
              Mason City, IA aka Shire of Heraldshill, Calontir
              http://www.strangelove.net/~kieser
              "Si no necare, sana." "Mir znachit Pax Romanov"
              --------------------------------------------------------------------





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Marilee Humason
              Well, this is based on the books I have read about the religion as it relates to my persona, who is a 16th century Russian/Moscow noblewoman. Not to be
              Message 6 of 19 , Jul 13 1:25 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Well, this is based on the books I have read about the
                religion as it relates to my persona, who is a 16th
                century Russian/Moscow noblewoman. Not to be confused
                with peasants or people in out laying areas where they
                are much less strict.
                Also the dresses are shapeless because I was 8 months
                pregnant and wearing the same dress I always wore and
                some people didn't know I was pregnant!
                I agree with the assessment from the Domostroi but if
                you read Olearius he talks about the great privaledge
                it was to actually meet the Boyars wife as they were
                not allowed out.
                And yes I do mean upper class, but then we in the
                Society are supposed to be creating noblemen. What we
                can actually create is not going to be purely period,
                it is going to be an SCA version of Period.
                Anastasia
                --- "L.M. Kies" <lkies@...> wrote:

                > > women were "evil" according to the
                > >religion, so they weren't allowed to "tempt" men in
                > >any way.
                >
                > I was always under the impression that such severe
                > attitudes about women were confined to the rantings
                > of monastic extremists, and not truly representative
                > of Russian culture as a whole. After all, maidens
                > were allowed to show their hair and women wore all
                > sorts of pretty, tempting things.
                >
                > And while Russian garments are often described as
                > "static" by authors, I find it much easier to move
                > in them than my old fitted kirtle, or my Elizabethan
                > bodice. So whose clothing is actually static?
                >
                > When cut correctly, I think Russian clothing is
                > rather graceful, and not "shapeless". But it's not
                > surprising that authors who've been indoctrinated
                > into Western-style clothing and modern tayloring
                > techniques and the benefits of the reforms of Peter
                > the Great may have trouble evaluating "old
                > fashioned" Eastern-style clothing on its own merits
                > without imposing their own biases and expectations.
                >
                >
                > >That is also why they were secluded in the
                > >later centuries and not allowed to be with any man
                > >other than their husband and immediate family
                >
                > Actually, only the very upper levels of late period
                > Russian society practiced the seclusion of the
                > terem. They were the only ones with houses big
                > enough to shut away the women. Although the women
                > weren't really shut away. They had an important
                > role to play in behind-the-scenes politics and
                > networking with the women of other noble families.
                > Politics was all about family connections, and it
                > was the women who made the marriages that created
                > those family connections. And if you read the
                > Domostroi carefully, you will see that the
                > "secluded" mistress of the house was expected to
                > supervise her servants and staff - including men,
                > and there are other examples of the role of women in
                > the Domostroi that clearly expect them to interact
                > to some extent with men outside their "immediate
                > family".
                >
                > So the seclusion of women could hardly be a
                > religious/moral requirement if less than 5% of
                > society could attempt it, and even that 5% didn't
                > follow it perfectly.
                >
                > Just some thoughts,
                >
                > Sofya
                >
                >
                --------------------------------------------------------------------
                > Lisa M. Kies, MD aka Lady Sofya la Rus
                > Mason City, IA aka Shire of Heraldshill, Calontir
                > http://www.strangelove.net/~kieser
                > "Si no necare, sana." "Mir znachit Pax Romanov"
                >
                --------------------------------------------------------------------
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > removed]
                >
                >


                Baroness Anastasia Alexandrovna Andreeva (OL)
              • Shannon Anderson
                I like the Russian silhouette, it s comfortable and natural enough. Why I m looking for something more fitted is a) there was only enough velvet left on the
                Message 7 of 19 , Jul 13 1:33 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  I like the Russian silhouette, it's comfortable and natural enough. Why I'm looking for something more fitted is a) there was only enough velvet left on the bolt I wanted for something skimpier and b) there's this European dress I've wanted to make for a long time and I was hoping to find it's Russian "cousin."

                  I may just make the jacket we've been discussing with my remaining fabric, to go over a more typical dress.

                  Thanks for the help,

                  Margarita


                  ---------------------------------
                  Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels with Yahoo! FareChase.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • DOUGLAS PETROFF
                  And please don t forget this all came about after the Mongolian period. The far eastern influence seems to play an important part. Sergius B
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jul 14 5:01 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    And please don't forget this all came about after the Mongolian period.
                    The far eastern influence seems to play an important part. Sergius B
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.