Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [sig] Inital information Matejko's time

Expand Messages
  • wheezul@canby.com
    ... I have found some German and French work that rivals work done by modern scholars. Each work should stand on its own merit in my opinion. A good example
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      >
      >
      > It's time for people to recognize the error in this line of thinking
      > and using it as some kind of measuring tool. That's where the disbelief
      > comes from. Having to take a second look at what we believe to be
      > correct and accepting that just possibly we aren't corrrect in all
      > situations. There was more going on in the 19th Century than the
      > Victorian Era.
      >
      > Magdalena Gdanska

      I have found some German and French work that rivals work done by modern
      scholars. Each work should stand on its own merit in my opinion.

      A good example is Norris, who took a really bad rap with the purple
      raritarian feather article. While it seems the author of the article
      wanted to rightly point out variances between the original artwork and the
      redrawings, it had the net effect of over reaction. The good thing is
      that people started to look for better archaeological and sources, but the
      down side was the loss of discussion about his interpretations and further
      investigation. It kind of boils down to the question of if we should
      review and revise the work done before, or just ignore it.

      A case in point might be the "oriental surcoat" that Norris says came back
      from the crusades. I have been told point blank by people that Norris
      "just made that up". Further study shows that he did indeed have a
      source, and the image, at least, was not a fanciful creation. It appears
      that he redrew several of Viollet-le-Duc's drawings. In Viollet-le-Duc's
      original drawing, he cites the source as sculpture in Ve'zelay, which he
      was responsible for restoring. Currently I have a friend in France who is
      a 12th century re-enactor who has promised to go to Ve'zelay to take a
      look. I have my doubts about this being a garment, but I won't be
      satisfied until the mystery is solved.

      I think it would be interesting to write an article about 19th century
      costume and medieval historians. This was the life's work and passion for
      some of them, and I think it might be useful to have a guide of their
      work.

      Katherine Barich
    • Tim Nalley
      That s the funny thing about Norris, its a mixed bag...mostly I use his books for their illustrative value and pattern value for newbies and new costumers.
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        That's the funny thing about Norris, its a mixed
        bag...mostly I use his books for their illustrative
        value and pattern value for newbies and new costumers.
        OTOH, while I've heard many dissing his books and the
        drawings/patterns within, I also tend to see people's
        "research" very closely resembling these same patterns
        and looks. I'm not dissing anyone, I'm just noting a
        remarkable simmilarity.
        Then again, I also use the Medieval Tailors
        Assistant for the same uses, though it has much wider
        acceptance, especially withing the Laurelate, for
        beginning and intermediiate costumers. Maybe its a
        utility and application question, as much as being a
        historical /artifactual one?
        'dok



        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Got a little couch potato?
        Check out fun summer activities for kids.
        http://search.yahoo.com/search?fr=oni_on_mail&p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz
      • magdalenag56
        I agree that each resource should stand on it s own merit but that won t happen until people give up on long held beliefs. I have read that Matejko would put
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I agree that each resource should stand on it's own merit but that
          won't happen until people give up on long held beliefs.

          I have read that Matejko would put people in historical paintings of
          battles who were not at those battles to make polical statements. Or he
          would use the faces of himself (Stanczyk the jester) or contemporaties
          in paintings. This could be seen by critics as Matejko not being
          accurate. What painter does not do this?

          My first "resource" was Racinet's book. Even at that level of
          inexperience I could see how bizarre and inaccurate alot of those
          drawings were. It served it's purpose to make me look further. Braun
          and Schneider is IMHO slightly more accurate than Racinet but still
          very Victorian.

          The SCA is supposed to be educational. If it is not, then it is nothing
          more than LARP. And being educational, does that cease when you become
          a Laurel? For some Laurel is the final achievement. Unfortunately that
          is the appearance some, and I repeat some, not all, laurels have given
          the rest of us, that once you've become a laurel you need learn no more
          (because you now know everything). I will go out on a limb and say that
          I would not seek out a book merely because the laurelate approves of
          it. If it were for instance, a well documented book or if it were a
          book with wide reaching information,that would make me look for it.

          New resources are coming out of Poland every day. Things long hidden
          are now being donated to museums. As much as I would like to, I cannot
          afford a trip to Poland at the moment. Those of you who can, please
          share with the rest of us.

          Magdalena Gdanska
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.