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Re: [sig] Polosh Liquer Question

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  • apacuska@comcast.net
    Eluned said: I have an almost empty bottle of a Polish (or at least, it came from there) Liquer I picked up while over in Poland. I really love it. I bought it
    Message 1 of 20 , Jan 3, 2007
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      Eluned said: I have an almost empty bottle of a Polish (or at least, it came from
      there) Liquer I picked up while over in Poland. I really love it. I
      bought it under the misunderstanding that it was mead, but am very
      glad I did buy it. It is delicious, and somewhat potent as well.
      The label says "Miod Pitny Dwojniak", then, under a picture of some
      berries, "Maliniak" (I should say I had thought it was a melomel,
      which is honey-mead with fruit), and then in smaller letters
      below, "Owocowy". It comes in a geen-brown pottery bottle with a red
      wax seal on it (as well as the paper one).

      If it's an alcohol made of honey you can pretty much call it mead (the exception is honey wine - which is wine with honey added) - so you were right, it was mead, a melomel as you suspected (as you know, if it contains spices it's a metheglin, if fruit a melomel). What made you think it was a "misuderstanding"?

      Mead is actually pretty easy to make and there are quick meads that you can have ready in about 2 months. The better ones take about 6 mos. If you get it on now, you can have a good batch by the summer (in N Hem. winter if S). You should try your hand at it. Making it yourself is always better than buying it (although there are some really excellent commercial, albeit small batch, meads available online, hopefully to your state - or you can have a local liquor store order them). It's not like the recipes change - though limiting your yeast source might solve the "period" issue. water + yeast + honey + time = mead; and it's a recipe that predates ancient Egypt (along with the addition of spices and fruits - which will kick start the yeast as well, so you don't have to add yeast nutrient).

      Aleksa
    • Tracy Kremer
      Thank you for that clarification. I _should_ have said, mead with the water content of wine , or mead as I have known it previously , but I thought the
      Message 2 of 20 , Jan 11, 2007
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        Thank you for that clarification. I _should_ have
        said, "mead with the water content of wine", or "mead
        as I have known it previously", but I thought the
        previous posts to this thread made that point moot; we
        all now know that "miod" means honey - but also mead -
        and that the different _kinds_ of polish mead are
        defined by their water versus honey content - that
        would be before fermentation, since alchohol content
        is not part of the definition of the different kinds,
        although I expect there are expected standards.

        I myself have done some mead fermenting, and had
        wished to find out what they were like overseas. Now I
        have a new "brewing" goal, having found the pinnacle
        of mead creation; salud to the Miods of Poland!

        Oh, and two months for a quick mead? heck, I've done
        it in three weeks! You just have to keep it a bit
        warmer, and not expect much. Oh, and the recipes _do_
        make a difference, not to mention which kind of yeast
        you use.

        Speaking of ancient egypt; did you know that their
        famous beer (one of the reasons for the creation of
        agriculture) was actually more like a chardonet (sp?)
        in taste? And that they drank it with straws, so get
        past the debris floating on the surface? Cool stuff
        on the History Channel!

        Eluned


        --- apacuska@... wrote:

        > Eluned said: I have an almost empty bottle of a
        > Polish (or at least, it came from
        > there) Liquer I picked up while over in Poland. I
        > really love it. I
        > bought it under the misunderstanding that it was
        > mead, but am very
        > glad I did buy it. It is delicious, and somewhat
        > potent as well.
        > The label says "Miod Pitny Dwojniak", then, under a
        > picture of some
        > berries, "Maliniak" (I should say I had thought it
        > was a melomel,
        > which is honey-mead with fruit), and then in smaller
        > letters
        > below, "Owocowy". It comes in a geen-brown pottery
        > bottle with a red
        > wax seal on it (as well as the paper one).
        >
        > If it's an alcohol made of honey you can pretty much
        > call it mead (the exception is honey wine - which is
        > wine with honey added) - so you were right, it was
        > mead, a melomel as you suspected (as you know, if it
        > contains spices it's a metheglin, if fruit a
        > melomel). What made you think it was a
        > "misuderstanding"?
        >
        > Mead is actually pretty easy to make and there are
        > quick meads that you can have ready in about 2
        > months. The better ones take about 6 mos. If you
        > get it on now, you can have a good batch by the
        > summer (in N Hem. winter if S). You should try your
        > hand at it. Making it yourself is always better
        > than buying it (although there are some really
        > excellent commercial, albeit small batch, meads
        > available online, hopefully to your state - or you
        > can have a local liquor store order them). It's not
        > like the recipes change - though limiting your yeast
        > source might solve the "period" issue. water +
        > yeast + honey + time = mead; and it's a recipe that
        > predates ancient Egypt (along with the addition of
        > spices and fruits - which will kick start the yeast
        > as well, so you don't have to add yeast nutrient).
        >
        > Aleksa
        >


        CONTACT ME FOR CUST0M NECKLACES! For SCA, New Age, and lovers of amber and semiprecious stones...silver only, no gold. Nice prices, honest!

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      • Tracy Kremer
        MMMMM, sounds nice!!! Eluned ... CONTACT ME FOR CUST0M NECKLACES! For SCA, New Age, and lovers of amber and semiprecious stones...silver only, no gold. Nice
        Message 3 of 20 , Jan 11, 2007
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          MMMMM, sounds nice!!!

          Eluned

          --- Pan Zygmunt Nadratowski <panzygmunt@...>
          wrote:

          > Here's mine, from my SCA Polish Culture Handbook:
          >
          >
          > *Raspberry Krupnik (Polish)**
          >
          >
          >
          > The etymology of this item is weird. Another dish in
          > many of the cookbooks
          > is Barley & Mushroom soup, but is also called
          > *Krupnik.* Yet other cookbooks
          > list this vodka drink by that same name. So, I don't
          > understand what the
          > difference is, yet. Anyway, this is a very tasty
          > treat I have served to
          > guests iced, at my camp on hot summer nights.
          >
          >
          >
          > *Ingredients*
          >
          > 5th of vodka, one 24 oz. jar of honey, 2 small bags
          > of frozen fresh
          > raspberries (no bigger than 16 oz), One extra empty
          > bottle. Have the berries
          > thawed and ready to go.
          >
          >
          >
          > *Materials:* a funnel, a small-hole strainer (2
          > different sized ones works
          > best), cheesecloth, a sealable gallon container with
          > a large mouth, a large
          > soup pot and a couple large spoons.
          >
          >
          >
          > *Directions*
          >
          > 1. Combine 1.5 cups of honey (2 cups if berries
          > are not pre-sweetened)
          > with half as much water in the large soup pot and
          > stir until mixed well.
          > 2. Heat over medium/high heat until it begins to
          > bubble, then cut back
          > to a simmer. You'll have it right when lots of
          > little bubbles are coming to
          > the surface.
          > 3. Cook the honey/water mixture until it is
          > golden brown. All we're
          > looking to do here is carmelize the honey a bit.
          > It may not look right after
          > a while, so don't cook it more than 40 minutes.
          > Some foam may come to the
          > top - you can scoop it off into another bowl or
          > the sink with the large
          > spoon. I leave some in because I think it tastes
          > better.
          >
          >
          >
          > 1. While this is simmering, open the raspberry
          > bags and make sure
          > there is a lot of juice. If not, smash them in a
          > mixing bowl until they have
          > some juice (say, a nominal 1/2 cup). Put all of
          > the berries and their juice
          > into the gallon container, using a spoon if
          > needed.
          >
          >
          >
          > 1. After the honey is done simmering, take it off
          > the heat, away from
          > ANY open flames, and add the vodka. Stir well.
          > 2. Add the honey/vodka mixture to the berries.
          > Close the lid tight,
          > give it a couple shakes, and let it sit on the
          > counter a couple days so that
          > the berries infuse the krupnik. NOTE - the Poles
          > intended this to be drunk
          > with dinner, so you could make this at breakfast
          > and drink it for dinner. I
          > think it tastes best if you let it sit 2 – 3
          > days.
          >
          >
          >
          > 1. Strain the mixture, first through the
          > strainers and then through
          > the cheesecloth, making sure to get all the
          > berries and seeds out. It may be
          > a little murky from the foam - I think that's ok!
          > Or strain it until clear
          > if you like.
          >
          >
          >
          > 1. After straining, put the *krupnik* back into
          > the empty vodka bottle
          > (I soak the labels off first, whatever you like).
          > You'll have some left
          > over, which is what the other empty bottle is
          > for. After bottling, I let it
          > sit 1-2 days, since I think it tastes better, but
          > you don't have to.
          >
          >
          >
          > Chill and enjoy!
          >
          > --
          > Czesc Pan Zygmunt Nadratowski
          > Middle Kingdom, Pentamere, Shire of Talonval
          > Servant of His Grace Sir Dag Thorgrimsson and Master
          > Mordok Rostovskogo
          > SCA Polish Culture Resource:
          > http://www.plcommonwealth.org
          > "Discipline is the bridge between thought and
          > accomplishment." - Jets RB,
          > Curtis Martin
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been
          > removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          CONTACT ME FOR CUST0M NECKLACES! For SCA, New Age, and lovers of amber and semiprecious stones...silver only, no gold. Nice prices, honest!

          COMING SOON; ElunedsEmporium.com !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!











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