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Stoneware or soapstone

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  • saultk
    Who do you go to for your stoneware or soapstone needs? I am looking into getting new drinkware and tableware for events and am really interested in soapstone
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 2, 2007
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      Who do you go to for your stoneware or soapstone needs? I am looking
      into getting new drinkware and tableware for events and am really
      interested in soapstone or stoneware as opposed to ceramics, wood or
      pewter- I just can't seem to find anyone who works with it. (our gear
      takes quite a beating and the stoneware pans we use at home have stood
      up to several years use- including a rather clutzy cook!) I'm not
      exactly certain what style it is that I am interested in yet, so custom
      work may not be the best bet right now, but if anyone knows of someone
      who has soapstone/stoneware in stock or has pictures that I can peruse
      it would be very much appreciated!

      Very much obliged

      Keterlyn
    • bphall76@aol.com
      This place does soapstone gear; from stoves and boot warmers to goblets. Their prices seem reasonable as well. What s more they ll do custom work and they
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 2, 2007
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        This place does soapstone gear; from stoves and boot warmers to goblets.
        Their prices seem reasonable as well. What's more they'll do custom work and
        they have lots of pictures on the website.

        _Click here: Vermont Soapstone Fireplaces, Ovens, Masonry Heaters, and Wood
        Stoves_ (http://www.vermontwoodstove.com/)

        Vasilisa Myshkina
        Glymm Mere, An Tir



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rosie
        ... into getting new drinkware and tableware for events and am really interested in soapstone or stoneware. You could try your local uni if they offer ceramics
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 3, 2007
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          > Who do you go to for your stoneware or soapstone needs? I am looking
          into getting new drinkware and tableware for events and am really
          interested in soapstone or stoneware.

          You could try your local uni if they offer ceramics courses. They may
          be a bit wonkier than professionally done, but that's just character
          isn't it? They should charge you less. My brother just made me a set of
          feast gear out of stoneware. In class when he was supposed to be making
          teapots I believe. He dropped it on the slate floor and it didn't
          break. Not that I want to do the same in case it does.. Also, when I
          get my device passed, he's going to put it onto my crockery and refire
          it. That'll be rather funky.
          Rosie
        • Tracy Kremer
          Milady; Soapstone is a really bad idea for feast gear. It is much more fragile than ceramics of any kind, being a soft, carvable stone. Soapstone is what they
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 8, 2007
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            Milady;
            Soapstone is a really bad idea for feast gear. It is
            much more fragile than ceramics of any kind, being a
            soft, carvable stone. Soapstone is what they grind up
            for talcum powder, to give you an idea. Because it is
            a stone, it will also be thick and heavy for feast
            gear.
            Stoneware, on the other hand, is highly recommended
            for durability, even if it is a bit heavy.

            There are many, many local potters in the NC area; I
            don't know what area you live in, but chances are good
            you may have some in your area you did not know about.
            A good place to go to find out is to a large arts and
            crafts fair; you could contact the ones who hold these
            annually if there are none coming up soon where you
            live, to find some of the craftspeople they will be
            selling booth space to.
            You could probably also find some potters in the
            yellow pages. Some of them would probably be willing
            to do custome jobs, as well.

            Eluned

            --- Rosie <Rosie_0801@...> wrote:

            > > Who do you go to for your stoneware or soapstone
            > needs? I am looking
            > into getting new drinkware and tableware for events
            > and am really
            > interested in soapstone or stoneware.
            >
            > You could try your local uni if they offer ceramics
            > courses. They may
            > be a bit wonkier than professionally done, but
            > that's just character
            > isn't it? They should charge you less. My brother
            > just made me a set of
            > feast gear out of stoneware. In class when he was
            > supposed to be making
            > teapots I believe. He dropped it on the slate floor
            > and it didn't
            > break. Not that I want to do the same in case it
            > does.. Also, when I
            > get my device passed, he's going to put it onto my
            > crockery and refire
            > it. That'll be rather funky.
            > Rosie
            >
            >


            CONTACT ME FOR CUST0M NECKLACES! For SCA, New Age, and lovers of amber and semiprecious stones...silver only, no gold. Nice prices, honest!

            COMING SOON; ElunedsEmporium.com !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!









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          • Tracy Kremer
            Milord, stoneware is actually a kind of ceramic; a very, very tough ceramic with lots of silica in it and a very high firing temperature, such that regular
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 11, 2007
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              Milord, stoneware is actually a kind of ceramic; a
              very, very tough ceramic with lots of silica in it and
              a very high firing temperature, such that regular
              pottery kilns sometimes cannot fire hot enough to make
              stoneware. The silica melts and bonds to make it much
              tougher than the regular clay-based ceramics, more
              like stone than pottery. Or at least, that was what I
              was brought up calling stoneware.

              Eluned

              --- saultk <saultk@...> wrote:

              > Who do you go to for your stoneware or soapstone
              > needs? I am looking
              > into getting new drinkware and tableware for events
              > and am really
              > interested in soapstone or stoneware as opposed to
              > ceramics, wood or
              > pewter- I just can't seem to find anyone who works
              > with it. (our gear
              > takes quite a beating and the stoneware pans we use
              > at home have stood
              > up to several years use- including a rather clutzy
              > cook!) I'm not
              > exactly certain what style it is that I am
              > interested in yet, so custom
              > work may not be the best bet right now, but if
              > anyone knows of someone
              > who has soapstone/stoneware in stock or has pictures
              > that I can peruse
              > it would be very much appreciated!
              >
              > Very much obliged
              >
              > Keterlyn
              >
              >


              CONTACT ME FOR CUST0M NECKLACES! For SCA, New Age, and lovers of amber and semiprecious stones...silver only, no gold. Nice prices, honest!

              COMING SOON; ElunedsEmporium.com !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!











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