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  • Rachel Sampsel
    I m afraid I m suffering from a bit of newbie Rus confusion: What would Non-royal nobles wear in a formal court setting and is there a pattern out there? I ask
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 29, 2006
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      I'm afraid I'm suffering from a bit of newbie Rus confusion: What would
      Non-royal nobles wear in a formal court setting and is there a pattern out
      there?

      I ask because I can find pictures that specifically state "princess"
      (married and unmarried) and 1 picture for an "unmarried boyarina" But
      nothing for a married boyarina, which is what I'm assuming would be
      similar in class ranking to non-royal nobles, given a merchants standing.

      Hoping to not look like an uneducated twit in court....

      Patches
    • Sam W (wOOt / Kotek
      During what time period? ~Kotek ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 29, 2006
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        During what time period?

        ~Kotek

        On 11/30/06, Rachel Sampsel <raelee@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > I'm afraid I'm suffering from a bit of newbie Rus confusion: What would
        > Non-royal nobles wear in a formal court setting and is there a pattern out
        > there?
        >
        > I ask because I can find pictures that specifically state "princess"
        > (married and unmarried) and 1 picture for an "unmarried boyarina" But
        > nothing for a married boyarina, which is what I'm assuming would be
        > similar in class ranking to non-royal nobles, given a merchants standing.
        >
        > Hoping to not look like an uneducated twit in court....
        >
        > Patches
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tim Nalley
        Early period or late? In the specific circumstances of a merchant, a good general rule for any time period or any area in the world is that you want to look
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 29, 2006
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          Early period or late? In the specific circumstances of
          a merchant, a good general rule for any time period or
          any area in the world is that you want to look
          successful but not wealthy. The latter would attract
          the predatory gaze and attention of several factions
          with grasping, parasitic qualities , at best (tax
          collectors, nobles pettling influence for a price,
          poor nobles with a name seeking to extort cash by
          threats of family connections, etc.) Basically lowlife
          mouthbreathers in fancy clothes(think criminal defense
          or personal injury attornies.

          In late period, my specialty, wealthy merchants would
          wear simple brocades and expensive imported wool
          (never silk, velvet, voided velvet, askamite samite
          like cloth of ore, etc.), laidwork and embroidered
          decoration (never gold, silver, pearls or jewels),
          common furs like martin, squirrel, red fox, beaver
          collars (never sable, ermine, black fox, etc.) In late
          16th century the nobles were bitterly complaining
          about the Service administrators wives wearing pearled
          hats....Baroness Anastasiia, Soraya or Luidmilla
          would probably becable to get into specifics about
          late period womens clothing. I would reccommend
          Tatjana, Predslava or Sofya La Rus (and her wonderful
          websites) for earlier period.
          'dok
          --- Rachel Sampsel <raelee@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          >
          > I'm afraid I'm suffering from a bit of newbie Rus
          > confusion: What would
          > Non-royal nobles wear in a formal court setting and
          > is there a pattern out
          > there?
          >
          > I ask because I can find pictures that specifically
          > state "princess"
          > (married and unmarried) and 1 picture for an
          > "unmarried boyarina" But
          > nothing for a married boyarina, which is what I'm
          > assuming would be
          > similar in class ranking to non-royal nobles, given
          > a merchants standing.
          >
          > Hoping to not look like an uneducated twit in
          > court....
          >
          > Patches
          >




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        • L.M. Kies
          Actually, it sounds like Patches has already been to my website, since I recognize the phrase unmarried boyarina and the existence of images of married and
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 29, 2006
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            Actually, it sounds like Patches has already been to my website, since I recognize the phrase "unmarried boyarina" and the existence of images of married and unmarried princesses combined with a lack of any "married boyarina" from one of my "Examples" pages.

            Anyway, the main difference between a married and unmarried boyarina, is that the married woman must cover her hair. The main difference between a princess and a boyarina would be, as Mordak indicated, the level of excess luxury and conspicuous consumption apparent in her attire - particularly elaborate imported fabrics and gold accessories.

            You would be quite safe in nice linens, wools, some relatively plain silks - embellished with contrasting fabric/fur trims, silver jewelry, a moderate amount of pearls, and semi-precious stones.

            And don't worry too much about it - most people will have no idea what is appropriate for a married Russian noblewoman to wear in court, and those of us who do, will hopefully be too polite to be overly critical of your efforts, and thrilled that even you tried.

            If you have specific questions about what you want to make, feel free to ask.

            Sofya

            ------- Original Message -------
            From : Tim Nalley[mailto:mordakus@...]






            I would recommend... Sofya La Rus (and her wonderful
            websites) for earlier period.
            'dok
            --- Rachel Sampsel <raelee@...> wrote:

            > What would
            > Non-royal nobles wear in a formal court setting and
            > is there a pattern out
            > there?
            >
            > I ask because I can find pictures that specifically
            > state "princess"
            > (married and unmarried) and 1 picture for an
            > "unmarried boyarina" But
            > nothing for a married boyarina, which is what I'm
            > assuming would be
            > similar in class ranking to non-royal nobles, given
            > a merchants standing.
            >
            > Hoping to not look like an uneducated twit in
            > court....
            >
            > Patches
            >




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            --------------------------------------------------------------------
            Lisa M. Kies, MD aka Lady Sofya la Rus
            Mason City, IA aka Shire of Heraldshill, Calontir
            http://www.strangelove.net/~kieser
            "Si no necare, sana."
            --------------------------------------------------------------------



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