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RE : [sig] Icon Painting Was: Pennsic 36 Inter-Kingdom Slavic

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  • L.M. Kies
    ... The Painter s Manual of Dionysius of Fourna, written in the 1730s at Mt. Athos, includes techniques traceable to 9th-10th century
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 30, 2006
      --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, "L.M. Kies" <lkies@...> wrote:
      >> Magdalena,
      >>
      >> Our lives are following disturbing parallels...  Both
      >letniks and icons?  Jinx!
      >
      >I've begun gessoing my own boards and experimenting to find which
      >binder I like best in the gesso. I don't know what was used in Eastern
      >Europe in Period. Do you?

      The Painter's Manual of Dionysius of Fourna, written in the 1730s at Mt. Athos, includes techniques traceable to 9th-10th century manuscripts.  He includes a detailed description of how to make glue from limed (or less preferably, unlimed) skins - choosing "skin from the feet or the ears of oxen, and any skins that cannot be put to any other use or are of little value.  If they are thick it does not matter; buffaloes and ewes are also good...."

      I have no reason to doubt that such traditional skin glue binder for gesso was also used in Russia, since so many Russian icons and icon painters trace from Mt. Athos.  And every other description of traditional egg tempera icon painting I've read describes the use of skin/gelatine-based glues.

      So far, I have not attempted true gesso.  I've been too impatient and too far from proper art supply stores.  :)

      Diosysius has some 5 recipes for varnish as well.  If you're interested.

      Sofya

      ----------------------------------------------
      Lisa M. Kies, MD
      Mason City, IA
      Lady Sofya la Rus
      Shire of Heraldshill, Calontir
      "Si no necare, sana."
      ----------------------------------------------



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