Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE : [sig] Voshvy (was: "Letnik"?)

Expand Messages
  • L.M. Kies
    Excellent.  One more mystery word bites the dust! Spasibo! Sofya
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 11, 2005
      Excellent.  One more mystery word bites the dust!

      Spasibo!
      Sofya

      >------- Original Message -------
      >From : Kseniia Smolnianina[mailto:kseniia@...]
      >Sent : 11/11/2005 1:40:24 PM
      >
      >My translation:
      >Voshva: The name comes from the verb "to sew to." In pre-Petrine
      >Rus' this is what they called a scrap of aksamite, velvet, taffeta in
      >the shape of a square, circle, etc., embroidered with gold, silver,
      >silk threads, decorated with plaques covered in pearls and precious
      >stones. A characteristic of certain ancient Russian articles of
      >clothing, for example, the letnik, the sleeves of which were decorated
      >with "voshvy."
      >
      >--Kseniia
      >
      >On 11/11/05, L.M. Kies wrote:
      >>
      >> Sleeves of letnikov were frequently embroidered "voshvami" - with striped aksamite, of black and crimson. (Pushkareva89)
    • Kseniia Smolnianina
      Your webpage has been an amazing resource for me, so I m happy I could be of some small help! You also wrote: [Prince Mikhail Andreevich s wife s dresses]
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 11, 2005
        Your webpage has been an amazing resource for me, so I'm happy I could
        be of some small help!

        You also wrote: "[Prince Mikhail Andreevich's wife's dresses]
        included letniki sewn of striped ob"yar, green and yellow kamki."

        I also looked up "ob"yar" and "kamki" as I've never seen these terms
        before. Here's what jargon.ru has to say:

        Transliteration:
        Ob"yar: Muar s zolotym ili serebryannym uzorom, tkan', modnya v 15-17
        vv. v Moskovskoi Rusi. Zachastuyu nazvanie upotreblyalos' dlya
        oboznacheniya obychnogo muara, bez zolota.

        My translation:
        Moire [watered silk] with a gold or silver pattern, fabric popular in
        the 15-17th centuries in Muscovite Rus. Frequently the name is used
        to mean ordinary moire without gold.

        Transliteration:
        Kamka: V 15 v. na Rusi shelkovyi uzornyi pavolok s odnotsvetnyv
        risunkom; shelkovaya kitaiskaya tkan' s razvodami.

        My translation:
        In 15th century Rus, imported patterned silk fabric with a
        single-colored pattern; Chinese silk fabric with broad/abstract
        designs.

        --Kseniia, bored at work, apparently. :)

        On 11/11/05, L.M. Kies <lkies@...> wrote:
        > Excellent. One more mystery word bites the dust!
        >
        > Spasibo!
        > Sofya
        >



        --
        **********************************
        Lady Kseniia Smolnianina
        Barony of Three Mountains
        Kingdom of An Tir
        *Si hoc legere scis, nimium eruditionis habes*
      • Sfandra
        ... Hey, keep being bored! Where are you finding these sites? Are you transliterating them yourself? --Sfandra (Got The Rosetta Stone: Russian 1 software
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 11, 2005
          > --Kseniia, bored at work, apparently. :)
          >


          Hey, keep being bored! Where are you finding these
          sites? Are you transliterating them yourself?

          --Sfandra

          (Got The Rosetta Stone: Russian 1 software for my
          bday, still haven't installed it, sob sob :( )

          ******************
          Sfandra Dmitrieva iz Chernigova
          Kingdom of the East
          ******************
          "Earth: The most dangerous place known to Man. Billions of humans have died there." --TarynEve, "Desert Isle" (ENTff)



          __________________________________
          Yahoo! FareChase: Search multiple travel sites in one click.
          http://farechase.yahoo.com
        • Kseniia Smolnianina
          Yes, I m transliterating and translating myself. The sites I m checking are in Russian, and include V. Dal s dictionary ( http://www.slova.ru ) and Zhargon (
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 11, 2005
            Yes, I'm transliterating and translating myself. The sites I'm
            checking are in Russian, and include V. Dal's dictionary (
            http://www.slova.ru ) and Zhargon ( http://www.zhargon.ru ). If you
            can read/type in Russian, they're pretty neat resources, at least for
            general definitions. Now if only I could find pictures of these
            things.... :)

            --Kseniia

            On 11/11/05, Sfandra <seonaid13@...> wrote:

            > Hey, keep being bored! Where are you finding these
            > sites? Are you transliterating them yourself?
            >
            > --Sfandra

            --
            **********************************
            Lady Kseniia Smolnianina
            Barony of Three Mountains
            Kingdom of An Tir
            *Si hoc legere scis, nimium eruditionis habes*
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.