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RE:fustian as velvet/velveteen in period WAS appropriate fabric for a letnik

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  • Linda
    Well now, as to cotton pile fabric (or cotton velvet) used for a letnik....... There was a cotton pile fabric called fustian from the early cotton industry
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 3, 2005
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      Well now, as to cotton pile fabric (or cotton velvet) used for a
      letnik.......

      There was a cotton pile fabric called fustian from the early cotton
      industry days made in Italy (as well as Cairo and Memphis, both the
      reputed 'birth place' of it).
      And before late period people start objecting to the dating of fustian,
      I'll say that the same 'names' get used over and over in history often
      with a slight change to content. There is 'fustian' in 11th and 12th
      century French texts and poems; there is fustian mentioned in Mazzaoui's
      book on the early cotton industry; there is fustian listed on the
      shipping lists and port tolls reported in pre-11th century economics
      research; cotton fustian was known in Elizabethan England; and fustian
      continues to be mentioned up through the 1700s, 1800s and 1900s.
      However, for the American Civil War re-enactors, it has mutated enough
      to have taken on the meaning of a plain weave, non-pile, cotton/linen
      blend.

      In Beck's well-known 'Drapers Dictionary' published in 1882, there is a
      rather extensive write-up on fustian which links it to the 10th century.
      It also links its manufacture to Moorish Spain in the early 13th c. The
      fiber content is thought (from records) to have been a cotton/linen
      blend at the time, but at least one recent researcher believes the word
      to have taken on the aspect of a general term for a class of cottons
      based on his research of shipping records.
      Beck quotes from an article by Baines, and says that the extract he
      quotes suggests that the warp was probably linen and the 'woof' [weft or
      filler] was probably cotton with cotton pile. He goes on : "Fustian is
      woven in the same manner as velvet, even to the shearing of its surface,
      and Dr. Rock thinks that this manufacture may have hinted to the
      Italians the way of weaving silk in the same manner, and so of producing
      velvet." He gives as the most likely earliest date of its use in England
      as 1114 for Cistercian priests chasubles.

      At times in England, around the 1500s, you will find English-made
      fustian listed with the worsteds, stamins, freezes, 'and other woollen
      cloths'and sometimes as one of the 'new draperies'(which are specific
      types of worsted wool) so its evident that England had a wool cloth that
      they also called 'fustian'. Beck quotes another who did research in
      charters of manufacture and export in England and tables of rates which
      list "mock velvet or fustian anapes". The fustian anapes is thought to
      have been shortened from "fustian of Naples".

      Beck goes on to say that " Velveteen or velveret are commonly included
      among fustians, as their manner of manufacture justifies. Corduroy and
      thickest are also coarser varieties of fustian." He also says that [in
      1882] fustian is a coarse twilled cotton cloth.
      Now, Beck has probably been supplanted by better and more detailed
      research and if you can provide that info I will gladly revise my
      statements and opinion, which follows:

      In My Opinion.... (she said)....cotton velveteen would be a good choice
      to simulate the period fustian.

      Thus ends the long-winded lesson on 'cotton/linen velvet...fustian'

      Maria Pienkneplotno..... Polish fabric merchant :-D




      From: "Rick Orli" <orlirva@...>
      Subject: Re: appropriate fabric for a letnik

      But if anyone asks, tell 'em its silk (cotton velvet may not have
      existed). -Rick
      --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, "Xristina Viaceslavova"
      <dyscordant_rose@y...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a beautiful deep red short pile cotton velvet with no pattern
      > on it. I was wondering if it would be appropriate to use for a
      Letnik?

      --
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      11/3/2005
    • Sfandra
      ... ... Maria -- Thank you for the lesson! I m always interested in lessons on period fabrics, it s nice to see it here in context. Do you merchant, or
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 4, 2005
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        --- Linda <fabrix@...> wrote:

        > Well now, as to cotton pile fabric (or cotton
        > velvet) used for a letnik.......
        <SNIP>
        > Thus ends the long-winded lesson on 'cotton/linen
        > velvet...fustian'
        >
        > Maria Pienkneplotno..... Polish fabric merchant :-D

        Maria --
        Thank you for the lesson! I'm always interested in
        lessons on period fabrics, it's nice to see it here in
        context.

        Do you merchant, or is that your persona? If you
        merchant, do you have a website or event schedule?
        I'm on a personal quest to only patronize those
        merchants who have done research on their goods and
        make an effort to provide period or almost-period
        goods.

        Thanks!
        Sfandra Dmitreva
        (and now I won't hesitate any longer about buying
        cotton velveteen! :D )



        ******************
        Sfandra Dmitrieva iz Chernigova
        Kingdom of the East
        ******************
        "Earth: The most dangerous place known to Man. Billions of humans have died there." --TarynEve, "Desert Isle" (ENTff)




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