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  • Paul W Goldschmidt
    Anyone want to take a stab at vyt ? No, it s not a typo for byt or byt . It is its own word. Here are two sentences using the word: Stolovye obikhodniki
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 26, 2005
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      Anyone want to take a stab at vyt'?

      No, it's not a typo for byt or byt'. It is its own word. Here are two
      sentences using the word:

      "Stolovye obikhodniki raspisyvali dnevnye vyti i godichnyi krug trapez dlia
      riadovykh, preimushchestvenno postnykh dnei"

      - and -

      "Trapeza -- obshchee nazvanie liuboi vyti."

      I've checked modern dictionaries and Dal' and found nothing, not even a
      similar word to derive a root from.

      -- Paul
    • LiudmilaV@aol.com
      In a message dated 6/26/2005 10:06:20 AM Pacific Daylight Time, goldschp@tds.net writes: Stolovye obikhodniki raspisyvali dnevnye vyti i godichnyi krug trapez
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 26, 2005
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        In a message dated 6/26/2005 10:06:20 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
        goldschp@... writes:

        Stolovye obikhodniki raspisyvali dnevnye vyti i godichnyi krug trapez dlia
        riadovykh, preimushchestvenno postnykh dnei"




        The source completely evades me now, but a few months ago while researching
        Russian food I came across a definition of "vyt'" as mealtime, along with the
        description of when the meals were typically taken and what they were
        called. But where did I read this... However, Dal' does have this definition in the
        dictionary, among others. See _http://www.oval.ru/dal/5095.html_
        (http://www.oval.ru/dal/5095.html)

        Liudmila


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • K. Cargill
        Sreznevsky (Materialy dlja slovarja drevnerusskogo jazyka) offers the following explanation: Vyt oznachala uchastok zemli, inogda i reki i ozera, so vsemi
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 26, 2005
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          Sreznevsky (Materialy dlja slovarja drevnerusskogo jazyka) offers the
          following explanation:

          "Vyt' oznachala uchastok zemli, inogda i reki i ozera, so vsemi ili
          neketorimi ugod'jami; v takom smysle dolzhno prinimat' vyti zverinykhi,
          bobrovykh i rybnykh lovlej; velichina i predeli etikh vytej
          opredeljalis' mestnost'ju. Vyt' oznachala izvestnoe chislo dvorov pri
          raskladke podatej. V mezhevanii vyt' byla opredelennaja pozemel'naja
          mera; ona schitalalas' pri izmerenii dvortsovykh i pomestnykh zemel' v
          12 chetvertej dobroj zemli, v 14 srednej i v 16 khudoj (Knig. sosh.
          pis'ma gor. Kam. 1587 g., Kar I. G. R. V. pr 816), ili, chto vse tozhe,
          v 6, 7, 8, desjatin, -- a pri izmerenii tserkovykh, monastyskikh i
          vladychnykh, t.e. arkhierejskikh -- v chetvertej zemli, kakoj by to ni
          bylo, t. e. w 5 desjatin."

          He then cites the word in its colloquial, transitive sense as "meal
          time", following passages from Maksimov's God na severe (1859):

          "Sr. vyt' (oblastn.): -- Beregovye nashi terskie obedat' sadjat'sja:
          pervaja vyt'. V 3 chasa za polden' ono (sol'nyshko) na shalonike (SW):
          vtoraja vyt', beregovye pouzhinajut (Maks. God na sev. 466). Idet
          sol'nyshko svoim cheredom po vetram, i opjat' muzhiku chetyrye vyti,
          chetyre raz est', dvenadtsat' chasov rabotat' ... (tak zhe 467)."

          Kenny
          Paul W Goldschmidt wrote:

          > Anyone want to take a stab at vyt'?
          >
          > No, it's not a typo for byt or byt'. It is its own word. Here are two
          > sentences using the word:
          >
          > "Stolovye obikhodniki raspisyvali dnevnye vyti i godichnyi krug trapez
          > dlia
          > riadovykh, preimushchestvenno postnykh dnei"
          >
          > - and -
          >
          > "Trapeza -- obshchee nazvanie liuboi vyti."
          >
          > I've checked modern dictionaries and Dal' and found nothing, not even a
          > similar word to derive a root from.
          >
          > -- Paul
          >
          >
          >
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        • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
          Greetings! The word was also explained in one of Pokhlebkin s books, but not Kitchens of Our Nations but From the History of Russian Couisine (afair), treating
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 11, 2005
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            Greetings!

            The word was also explained in one of Pokhlebkin's books, but not Kitchens of Our Nations but From the History of Russian Couisine (afair), treating the Russian cooking of 18-19-century period, reflected in Russian drama. As in Ostrovsky's plays there were loads of such lexics, my first association was with Pokhlebl\kin analysing a phrase from some Ostrovsky's play in teh book mentioned above.



            > In a message dated 6/26/2005 10:06:20 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
            > goldschp@... writes:
            >
            > Stolovye obikhodniki raspisyvali dnevnye vyti i godichnyi krug trapez dlia
            > riadovykh, preimushchestvenno postnykh dnei"
            > The source completely evades me now, but a few months ago while researching
            > Russian food I came across a definition of "vyt'" as mealtime, along with the
            > description of when the meals were typically taken and what they were
            > called. But where did I read this... However, Dal' does have this definition in the
            > dictionary, among others. See _http://www.oval.ru/dal/5095.html_
            > (http://www.oval.ru/dal/5095.html)
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