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Russian Food

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  • mykanderson
    Well it seems I have been drafted to be the Feastocrat for an event and they made the mistake of letting me decide on what to cook. So I thought I might try a
    Message 1 of 5 , May 27, 2005
      Well it seems I have been drafted to be the Feastocrat for an event
      and they made the mistake of letting me decide on what to cook. So I
      thought I might try a period Russian feast. So any recipes or ideas
      that you all might have would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.





      Timushka
    • purplkat@optonline.net
      oohhh!!!! where!! when!!!! Katheryne ... From: mykanderson Well it seems I have been drafted to be the Feastocrat for an event and they
      Message 2 of 5 , May 30, 2005
        oohhh!!!!
        where!! when!!!!

        Katheryne

        ----------- Original Message ----
        From: mykanderson <mykanderson@...>

        Well it seems I have been drafted to be the Feastocrat for an event
        and they made the mistake of letting me decide on what to cook. So I
        thought I might try a period Russian feast. So any recipes or ideas
        that you all might have would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.

        Timushka
      • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
        ... Greetings. Here s a couple of pages you might find helpful: http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/slavic/slavicfood.html
        Message 3 of 5 , May 31, 2005
          > Well it seems I have been drafted to be the Feastocrat for an event
          > and they made the mistake of letting me decide on what to cook. So I
          > thought I might try a period Russian feast. So any recipes or ideas
          > that you all might have would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.

          Greetings. Here's a couple of pages you might find helpful:

          http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/slavic/slavicfood.html

          http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/cooking/poliudie.htm

          --
          -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
          "All of us have special ones who have loved us into being. Would you
          just take, along with me, ten seconds to think of the people who have
          helped you become who you are. " -- Mr. Fred Rogers
        • Stephanie M. Ross
          ... I ... My shire is also planning a Russian themed event. The guy who wanted to feastcrat wasn t happy when we sprung the idea on him though. He grumped
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 11, 2005
            --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, "mykanderson" <mykanderson@y...> wrote:
            > Well it seems I have been drafted to be the Feastocrat for an event
            > and they made the mistake of letting me decide on what to cook. So
            I
            > thought I might try a period Russian feast. So any recipes or ideas
            > that you all might have would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.

            > Timushka

            My shire is also planning a Russian themed event. The guy who wanted
            to feastcrat wasn't happy when we sprung the idea on him though. He
            grumped about having to dig up documentation for a period Russian
            feast. He is Hungarian mundanely, and had this notion that his modern
            Hungarian recipes would work for a medieval Russian feast. So I loaned
            him The Domostroi, Food and Drink in Medieval Poland, and Food in
            Russian History and Culture. Lesley Chamberlaine's The Food and
            Cooking of Russia is pretty good too, but few real period recipes. The
            paragraph in << >> is taken from a post to my shire's yahoo list,
            where I talk about what I'd make if I was feastcrat (and I am bummed
            that I'm not, but he volunteered before I arrived at meeting, so i
            missed my chance, wah). The Domolstroi is your best bet for figuring
            out what they actually ate in period, but there a no recipes in it, or
            very few anyway. You will have to extrapolate and make educated
            guesses as to which modern recipes approximate the ones described in
            the Domostroi. Just remember that Peter the Great brought in French
            cooks which changed the cuisine the nobility ate in a big way. Through
            study you can get a feel for modern recipes that are French-
            influenced, as well as those that come from the southern regions.
            Georgian food et al has become mainstream in modern Russian cooking,
            but it's doubtful that they would have eaten any of it in Muscovy or
            even Ukraine in period. Jadwiga's website is terrific, and she is very
            knowledgeable and helpful. (Hi Jadwiga, it's Aislinn from the SCA
            cook's list). On to the post:
            <<At first I thought the chicken with prunes was a little weird, and
            technically it is for Russian, but then I found a Polish recipe for
            it that is very similar to yours Mistress Oriana. I like the thought
            of it stuffed with kasha, yum. The kasha recipe from the Domostroi
            is cooked with onion and ham, which sounds very tasty too. My
            suggestion for the appetizer tray would be blini, ya gotta have
            blini, with melted butter and sour cream, smoked salmon thinly
            sliced, thinly sliced smoked meaty whitefish, a small amount of
            caviar, pickles, pickled beets, pickled mushrooms and maybe small
            sausages. Hell, slices of kielbasa would work to lighten the budget.
            I would also serve pork borcht with no tomatoes in it, with black
            bread. One of the courses would have to be piroshki, and I am fond
            of diced hard-boiled egg and mushroom filling myself. The cabbage-
            filled ones are pretty good too. The pastry for the piroshki could
            be wonton wrappers. I used those wrappers to make meatpies for a
            feast I did in Atlantia, and they worked very well baked. If I were
            going to do an OOP cake, I would make Natasha's honey cake, which is
            awesome for breakfast actually. As for salmon, they have
            individually frozen portions for pretty cheap at Sav-A-Lot, and
            perhaps it could be steamed and brushed with liquid smoke to get the
            smoked salmon effect? I own a small smoker that belonged to my mom,
            but I've never used it. For dessert perhaps a fruit cocktail of
            (canned) apples, pears and cherries, with the addition of honey to
            some of the sugar syrup in the can to mimic the honey-brine
            preserved fruits mentioned in the Domostroi? Served over small
            boiled cottage cheese dumplings?

            Sorry guys, this really should be a post for the Trimariscookslist, but
            Oriana got me thinking... (She's good for that).>>>

            Hope this is helpful,
            Nadya
          • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
            Greetings! ... Weeeeelll... AFAIR Poland was much more influenced by the Central/Western Europe, especially by the time of late medieval... (skipped) ... or
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 12, 2005
              Greetings!


              > My shire is also planning a Russian themed event. The guy who wanted
              > to feastcrat wasn't happy when we sprung the idea on him though. He
              > grumped about having to dig up documentation for a period Russian
              > feast. He is Hungarian mundanely, and had this notion that his modern
              > Hungarian recipes would work for a medieval Russian feast. So I loaned
              > him The Domostroi, Food and Drink in Medieval Poland, and Food in
              Weeeeelll...
              AFAIR Poland was much more influenced by the Central/Western Europe, especially by the time of late medieval...
              (skipped)

              > <<At first I thought the chicken with prunes was a little weird, and
              > technically it is for Russian, but then I found a Polish recipe for
              > it that is very similar to yours Mistress Oriana. I like the thought
              > of it stuffed with kasha, yum. The kasha recipe from the Domostroi
              > is cooked with onion and ham, which sounds very tasty too. My
              > suggestion for the appetizer tray would be blini, ya gotta have
              > blini, with melted butter and sour cream, smoked salmon thinly
              > sliced, thinly sliced smoked meaty whitefish, a small amount of
              or chopped salmon, as a spread...
              or onion+chopped bacon fat\lard, fried on the pan (pripyok if we treat Blini culture of the Russians, Machanka if we treat traditional couisine of Buelorussia - if we add sour cream to this, but be careful, only traditionally-thin Buelorussians can eat Machanka with potato oladii and remain thin as they were, all the other nations gain weight on this diet with lightning speed :-) )

              > caviar, pickles, pickled beets, pickled mushrooms and maybe small
              > sausages. Hell, slices of kielbasa would work to lighten the budget.
              Ergm, afaik sausages were gained by the Russian kitchen from the Germans...


              Bye,
              Alex
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