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Re: [sig] Digest Number 1729

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  • mir.plemmons@gmail.com
    On thatching, if you were *really* invested in doing this: you thatch in bundles, a big handful of straw that you tie together near one end (leave a few
    Message 1 of 2 , May 3, 2005
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      On thatching, if you were *really* invested in doing this: you thatch in bundles, a big handful of straw that you tie together near one end (leave a few inches). You then tie each bundle right next to the previous one over your horizontal poles. Think a bunch of round brooms squeezed together. That shrub look you see in cottage photos is only because people trim their thatch. If you were doing a setup-takedown, you *could* stitch these rows to burlap instead of a pole and spread the burlap over your framing but it'd be such a huge thing to transport regardless of whether you prep the bundles (and don't think you're going to get thatch from bales either - you'll be grabbing a handful, scything and tying like your persona's serfs). I've thatched with long grass, had a lovely day and left it up for a season but can't imagine thatching 20 times in one year.

      What I want to do is to make a fake roof like a bamboo mat or one of those Ikea bed frames with the slats stapled to strapping. I can get cedar strips a couple of inches long by 5-6 feet, and I've seen Rus roofs that were one long skinny board/shingle with the lower tip cut leaf or onion dome style. I figure I can staple these flush with each other to strapping and roll up the slat "roof" like those tables, and lay it out on a framework over my *real* roof.. (Mind you, this tourney season will probably only see the inside done... this is a big project).

      Hoping this helps others think (and debating putting it to the medieval encampment list)

      v'gosudar'delo - and happy 40th year!
      Mir

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rick Orli
      Yes, thatching could be a serious project. Using bales I had envisioned running some lines back and forth across the roof and then stuffing them with hay
      Message 2 of 2 , May 9, 2005
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        Yes, thatching could be a serious project. Using bales I had
        envisioned running some lines back and forth across the roof and
        then stuffing them with hay squares....that is pealing 2-3 inch
        thick 'squares' like tiles from the bale. Sometimes the squares
        come off neat but it does not matter much if they do not. Of
        course this would produce a minimal-quality product. However, If I
        was really going to do this, it would more likely be for something
        like a renfair or as a seasonal backyard playhouse that stays up for
        six weeks-plus which would justify a better thatching job or even a
        cedar shake roof.

        -Rick

        --- In sig@yahoogroups.com, mir.plemmons@g... wrote:
        > On thatching, if you were *really* invested in doing this: you
        thatch in bundles, a big handful of straw that you tie together near
        one end (leave a few inches). You then tie each bundle right next
        to the previous one over your horizontal poles. Think a bunch of
        round brooms squeezed together. That shrub look you see in cottage
        photos is only because people trim their thatch. If you were doing
        a setup-takedown, you *could* stitch these rows to burlap instead of
        a pole and spread the burlap over your framing but it'd be such a
        huge thing to transport regardless of whether you prep the bundles
        (and don't think you're going to get thatch from bales either -
        you'll be grabbing a handful, scything and tying like your persona's
        serfs). I've thatched with long grass, had a lovely day and left it
        up for a season but can't imagine thatching 20 times in one year.
        >
        > What I want to do is to make a fake roof like a bamboo mat or one
        of those Ikea bed frames with the slats stapled to strapping. I can
        get cedar strips a couple of inches long by 5-6 feet, and I've seen
        Rus roofs that were one long skinny board/shingle with the lower tip
        cut leaf or onion dome style. I figure I can staple these flush
        with each other to strapping and roll up the slat "roof" like those
        tables, and lay it out on a framework over my *real* roof.. (Mind
        you, this tourney season will probably only see the inside done...
        this is a big project).
        >
        > Hoping this helps others think (and debating putting it to the
        medieval encampment list)
        >
        > v'gosudar'delo - and happy 40th year!
        > Mir
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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