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I want to buy a Sierra Wilderness Radio soon.

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  • Donavan
    Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard. What type of antennas are successful with say
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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      Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard.

      What type of antennas are successful with say 40m, 30m, 20m, and 15m?

      73's

      Donavan
      k5ezy
    • Hank Greeb
      The best antenna I ve ever used on these bands was an array of2 4 element yagis, spaced on a 200 tower, full size, for 40 meters, and individual banks of 2
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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        The best antenna I've ever used on these bands was an array of 2 4 element yagis, spaced on a 200' tower, full size, for40 meters, and individual banksof 2 multi-element yagis for each of the lower wavelength bands optimally spaced between the 40 meter yagis.  I've used this at a friend's "contest station" - probably cost this fellow >$200,000 plus whatever his 80 acre farm cost initially.  WAAYYY beyond my financial capabilities, but "fun" to use.


        Putting together such an array in the field is a daunting task, so I generally use either a 33' wire supported by a 31' jackite pole, connected as a vertical radiator, with counterpoises for whichever band(s) I desire to use, and a matching device to counteract any mismatch of this wire and present a 50 ohm load for the rig to see.

        A better choice is, when possible, a dipole, either rigged as a horizontal dipole or an inverted V, of whatever length possible, preferably >50 feet or so for 40 meters and lower wavelengths, fed with 300 ohm or 450 ohm windowline, and using a balun (typically a 4/1 balun, though I usually have a 1/1 balun handy as well) and an impedance matching device to convert whatever impedance is presented to 50 ohms resistive for the rig.

        I typicallydon'tgo on long hikes, so I carrya tennis ball launcher(the brand I use is "hyperdog") but any sling shot device would work, and a spinning reel with 3 pound test fishing line. I shoot a line over convenientlylocated "naturallyoccurring antenna supports" (otherwiseknown as trees to the common folks), then pull light "carpenter'stwine" over the support, and, if I'm using light enough wire, I use this.  If I'm carrying #18 or #16 wire, I generally pull a hunk of 3/16' nylon rope over the support and use that to support the dipole. 

        The higher the better - sometimes I can find "naturallyoccurring antenna supports" with a height of 20 meters more (60 feet or more).   In such cases the antenna works as well as what I have at home.

        I've experimented with end fed wires, windomantenna(a single wire of 1/2 wavelength at the longest wavelength desired, fed off center with a single wire),curtain antennae (which are easy to make for 20 meter operation and shorter wavelengths), etc.

        All of these radiate somewhat better than a dummy load buried 6' underground.  So, my advice is "just do it!"

        I'm sure you'll find that whatever you stringup will radiate some RF, and hopefully some fellowhams will find your signals.

        72/73de n8xx Hg
        QRP
        >99.44% of
        the time
         

        On 8/7/2013 1:12 PM, Donavan wrote:
        Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard.
        
        What type of antennas are successful with say 40m, 30m, 20m, and 15m?
        
        73's
        
        Donavan
        k5ezy
        
      • Alex
        Hi Donavan For portable use I have settled on a telescopic fibreglass fishing pole 30 long. It compacts to about 3 for portage. Wire is 26 long attached at
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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          Hi Donavan

          For portable use I have settled on a telescopic fibreglass fishing pole 30' long.
          It compacts to about 3' for portage.

          Wire is 26' long attached at the tip, then a steel slinky droops below
          with a wire from the bottom to clip on the slinky at max Rx noise.

          A couple of radials of random length spread around as length does not matter
          when the radial is on the ground. Used on 80m - 15m.

          The slinky is not used on 20m and up. I have a HB Z-match to keep
          everything happy at the Tx end.

          At the bottom I have a steel spike inserted into a timber plug that fits inside
          the base of pole.

          It has been real handy when trees have not been available to throw a long wire over.

          Hope it helps

          regards

          Alex VK2KR

          Donavan wrote:
           

          Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard.

          What type of antennas are successful with say 40m, 30m, 20m, and 15m?

          73's

          Donavan
          k5ezy

        • Donavan Sands
          Alex, Thanks for the portable antenna information. I will keep this in mind. What kind of tuner is the HB Z-match? Donavan k5ezy
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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            Alex,

            Thanks for the portable antenna information. I will keep this in mind. What kind of tuner is the HB Z-match?

            Donavan k5ezy


            On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 8:49 PM, Alex <aberkuta@...> wrote:
             

            Hi Donavan

            For portable use I have settled on a telescopic fibreglass fishing pole 30' long.
            It compacts to about 3' for portage.

            Wire is 26' long attached at the tip, then a steel slinky droops below
            with a wire from the bottom to clip on the slinky at max Rx noise.

            A couple of radials of random length spread around as length does not matter
            when the radial is on the ground. Used on 80m - 15m.

            The slinky is not used on 20m and up. I have a HB Z-match to keep
            everything happy at the Tx end.

            At the bottom I have a steel spike inserted into a timber plug that fits inside
            the base of pole.

            It has been real handy when trees have not been available to throw a long wire over.

            Hope it helps

            regards

            Alex VK2KR



            Donavan wrote:
             

            Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard.

            What type of antennas are successful with say 40m, 30m, 20m, and 15m?

            73's

            Donavan
            k5ezy


          • Donavan Sands
            Hank, Thanks for the different field antenna ideas. I can not wait to try them out. I let you know how it turns out. Donavan k5ezy
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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              Hank,

              Thanks for the different field antenna ideas. I can not wait to try them out. I let you know how it turns out.

              Donavan k5ezy


              On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 3:39 PM, Hank Greeb <n8xx@...> wrote:
               


              The best antenna I've ever used on these bands was an array of 2 4 element yagis, spaced on a 200' tower, full size, for40 meters, and individual banksof 2 multi-element yagis for each of the lower wavelength bands optimally spaced between the 40 meter yagis.  I've used this at a friend's "contest station" - probably cost this fellow >$200,000 plus whatever his 80 acre farm cost initially.  WAAYYY beyond my financial capabilities, but "fun" to use.


              Putting together such an array in the field is a daunting task, so I generally use either a 33' wire supported by a 31' jackite pole, connected as a vertical radiator, with counterpoises for whichever band(s) I desire to use, and a matching device to counteract any mismatch of this wire and present a 50 ohm load for the rig to see.

              A better choice is, when possible, a dipole, either rigged as a horizontal dipole or an inverted V, of whatever length possible, preferably >50 feet or so for 40 meters and lower wavelengths, fed with 300 ohm or 450 ohm windowline, and using a balun (typically a 4/1 balun, though I usually have a 1/1 balun handy as well) and an impedance matching device to convert whatever impedance is presented to 50 ohms resistive for the rig.

              I typicallydon'tgo on long hikes, so I carrya tennis ball launcher(the brand I use is "hyperdog") but any sling shot device would work, and a spinning reel with 3 pound test fishing line. I shoot a line over convenientlylocated "naturallyoccurring antenna supports" (otherwiseknown as trees to the common folks), then pull light "carpenter'stwine" over the support, and, if I'm using light enough wire, I use this.  If I'm carrying #18 or #16 wire, I generally pull a hunk of 3/16' nylon rope over the support and use that to support the dipole. 

              The higher the better - sometimes I can find "naturallyoccurring antenna supports" with a height of 20 meters more (60 feet or more).   In such cases the antenna works as well as what I have at home.

              I've experimented with end fed wires, windomantenna(a single wire of 1/2 wavelength at the longest wavelength desired, fed off center with a single wire),curtain antennae (which are easy to make for 20 meter operation and shorter wavelengths), etc.

              All of these radiate somewhat better than a dummy load buried 6' underground.  So, my advice is "just do it!"

              I'm sure you'll find that whatever you stringup will radiate some RF, and hopefully some fellowhams will find your signals.

              72/73de n8xx Hg
              QRP >99.44% of the time
               

              On 8/7/2013 1:12 PM, Donavan wrote:
              Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard.
              
              What type of antennas are successful with say 40m, 30m, 20m, and 15m?
              
              73's
              
              Donavan
              k5ezy
              


            • Alex
              Hi Donavan The Z match is a bit different to the usual L or T matching type of tuners, it can tune balanced (loops) or unbalanced antennas. With a single large
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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                Hi Donavan

                The Z match is a bit different to the usual L or T matching type of tuners, it can tune balanced
                (loops) or unbalanced antennas. With a single large toroid it can be made fairly compact
                for portable use.

                Commercial kits are the ZM2 by Emtech? and the BLT tuner in the link below.
                <http://www.qrpkits.com/blt_plus.html>

                You can also incorporate a SWR meter/LED to indicate a match between the antenna and Tx,
                The Dan Tailoe ? design with a LED is very effective and compact and is incorporated
                in the ZM2 kit.

                Otherwise you can build in the Noga Club version of the Stockton wattmeter
                <http://www.nogaqrp.org/projects/NOGAwatt/kitinfo.html>

                A good site for building your own is
                <http://www.qsl.net/wb3gck/zmatch.htm>

                I have built a couple of the tuners in various sizes for home and portable use
                and incorporated a HB version of the Noga wattmeter design with twin meters.

                Even tuned a steel bar stool and the roof of a car port hi Hi.

                A link to a larger one for base rig is the following - good for 60 watts at least depending on the variable cap rating

                <http://users.tpg.com.au/users/ldbutler/SingleCoilZMatch.htm>

                73  Alex VK2KR
                 

                Donavan Sands wrote:
                 
                Alex,

                Thanks for the portable antenna information. I will keep this in mind. What kind of tuner is the HB Z-match?

                Donavan k5ezy


              • Hank Greeb
                Donavan; The easiest uses a 31 collapsible pole (Jackite makes one, lots of Kite Stores have them) to support a vertical radiator. But, a horizontal (or
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 7, 2013
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                  Donavan;

                  The "easiest" uses a 31' collapsible pole (Jackite makes one, lots of Kite Stores have them) to support a vertical radiator.   But, a horizontal (or configured as an "inverted Vee" seems to work better when one has time and energy to put something like that up.  There are times and places for each - and each will allow contacts.

                  I learned from my father, ex-WØHZP, now SK, that most any wire which could be loaded up would radiate, but the higher the better.  In earlier daze, when the kidz were young, and we didn't have much money, we did lots of camping, and there were often trees 60 feet high or higher.  It was during those days that I found that, in almost every case, the higher the better for a dipole antenna. 

                  Now a daze I sometimes take my AT-Sprint rig out when I hike along the White Pine Trail.  This hiking trail is built on the right of way of a former railroad, and now has many 50' to 70' trees along each side, which makes for excellent antenna supports. 

                  I call my current antenna (an inverted V, 135' center fed, with 400 ohm "window line", 28' in the center, and about 10' high at the ends), an antenna proven to be "somewhat better than a dummy load buried 6' underground."    Occasionally I get brave, and manage to get the apex @ 40 feet, which seems to improve the radiation effectiveness (only measured empirically, not with any scientific data).  However, at 40' it takes an extra set of guys for stability, and I rarely keep it up at that height except for a single weekend contest.

                  Do post here in this reflector, and on QRP-L if you're a member there, your schedule when you plan to be out and about with your Sierra rig.  You'll find publicity of this kind will make for more Q's.

                  72/73 de n8xx Hg
                  QRP >99.44% of the time

                  On 8/8/2013 12:00 AM, Donavan Sands wrote:
                  Hank,

                  Thanks for the different field antenna ideas. I can not wait to try them out. I let you know how it turns out.

                  Donavan k5ezy


                  On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 3:39 PM, Hank Greeb <n8xx@...> wrote:

                  The best antenna I've ever used on these bands was an array of 2 4 element yagis, spaced on a 200'tower, full size, for 40 meters, and individual banks of 2 multi-element yagis for each of the lower wavelength bands optimally spaced between the 40 meter yagis.  I've used this at a friend's "contest station" - probably cost this fellow >$200,000plus whatever his 80 acre farm cost initially.  WAAYYY beyond my financial capabilities,but "fun" to use.


                  Putting together such an array in the field is a daunting task, so I generally use either a 33' wire supported by a 31' jackite pole, connected as a verticalradiator, with counterpoises for whichever band(s) I desire to use, and a matching device to counteract any mismatch of this wire and present a 50 ohm load for the rig to see.

                  A better choice is, when possible, a dipole,either rigged as a horizontaldipole or an inverted V, of whatever length possible, preferably >50 feet or so for 40 meters and lower wavelengths, fed with 300 ohm or 450 ohm windowline, and using a balun (typically a 4/1 balun, though I usually have a 1/1 balun handy as well) and an impedance matching device to convert whatever impedance is presented to 50 ohms resistive for the rig.

                  I typicallydon'tgo on long hikes, so I carrya tennis ball launcher(the brand I use is "hyperdog") but any sling shot device would work, and a spinning reel with 3 pound test fishing line. I shoot a line over convenientlylocated "naturallyoccurring antenna supports" (otherwiseknown as trees to the common folks), then pull light "carpenter'stwine" over the support, and, if I'm using light enough wire, I use this.  If I'm carrying #18 or #16 wire, I generally pull a hunk of 3/16' nylon rope over the support and use that to support the dipole. 

                  The higher the better - sometimes I can find "naturallyoccurring antenna supports" with a height of 20 meters more (60 feet or more).   In such cases the antenna works as well as what I have at home.

                  I've experimented with end fed wires, windomantenna(a single wire of 1/2 wavelength at the longest wavelength desired, fed off center with a single wire),curtain antennae (which are easy to make for 20 meter operation and shorter wavelengths), etc.

                  All of these radiate somewhat better than a dummy load buried 6' underground.  So, my advice is "just do it!"

                  I'm sure you'll find that whatever you stringup will radiate some RF, and hopefully some fellowhams will find your signals.

                  72/73de n8xx Hg
                  QRP >99.44% of the time
                   

                  On 8/7/2013 1:12 PM, Donavan wrote:
                  Soon I will buy the portable Sierra Transceiver. I plan to use it on camping trips, hiking and my own backyard.
                  
                  What type of antennas are successful with say 40m, 30m, 20m, and 15m?
                  
                  73's
                  
                  Donavan
                  k5ezy
                  

                • Nick Tsakonas
                  Hi Donovan, For portable operations where I don t want to spend a lot of time setting-up/tearing-down I use a Norcal doublet combined with the BLT+ tuner (from
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 8, 2013
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                    Hi Donovan,
                    For portable operations where I don't want to spend a lot of time setting-up/tearing-down I use a Norcal doublet combined with the BLT+ tuner (from QRPKits) which,as Alex said, is a Z -tuner.
                    I use a telescopic fishing pole around 25 ft and I use it either in an inverted V configuration or if any tree branches are nearby I add some fishing line at the ends of the antenna and toss it over the branches with some weight to form a horizontal doublet.

                    The antenna is very good and the tuner can actually match it from 40m-10m without a problem.As it is a real 44f doublet it has all the advantages of that antenna: the main lobe points to the same direction for all bands, and the gain on the higher bands is a bit higher than on the lower, increasing as the frequency goes up.

                    see here for more info



                    Nick, SV1DJG




                    From: Alex <aberkuta@...>
                    To: sierra_wilderness_radio@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2013 7:28 AM
                    Subject: Re: [sierra_wilderness_radio] I want to buy a Sierra Wilderness Radio soon.

                     
                    Hi Donavan

                    The Z match is a bit different to the usual L or T matching type of tuners, it can tune balanced
                    (loops) or unbalanced antennas. With a single large toroid it can be made fairly compact
                    for portable use.

                    Commercial kits are the ZM2 by Emtech? and the BLT tuner in the link below.
                    <http://www.qrpkits.com/blt_plus.html>

                    You can also incorporate a SWR meter/LED to indicate a match between the antenna and Tx,
                    The Dan Tailoe ? design with a LED is very effective and compact and is incorporated
                    in the ZM2 kit.

                    Otherwise you can build in the Noga Club version of the Stockton wattmeter
                    <http://www.nogaqrp.org/projects/NOGAwatt/kitinfo.html>

                    A good site for building your own is
                    <http://www.qsl.net/wb3gck/zmatch.htm>

                    I have built a couple of the tuners in various sizes for home and portable use
                    and incorporated a HB version of the Noga wattmeter design with twin meters.

                    Even tuned a steel bar stool and the roof of a car port hi Hi.

                    A link to a larger one for base rig is the following - good for 60 watts at least depending on the variable cap rating

                    <http://users.tpg.com.au/users/ldbutler/SingleCoilZMatch.htm>

                    73  Alex VK2KR
                     

                    Donavan Sands wrote:
                     
                    Alex,

                    Thanks for the portable antenna information. I will keep this in mind. What kind of tuner is the HB Z-match?

                    Donavan k5ezy




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