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Simple Editor(s)?

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  • Matt
    Hello, all: I find myself dabbling in computer science at a ripe old age in my spare time. As such, my time and brain power are at a premium, and I don t
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
      Hello, all:

      I find myself dabbling in computer science at a ripe old age in my
      spare time. As such, my time and brain power are at a premium, and I
      don't relish the idea of learing anything along the lines of emacs
      just to get my parentheses balanced. Is there any brave sould out
      there willing to admit they use a "Scheme for Dummies" type editor,
      and would you mind telling me what it is?

      Thanks,
      Matt
    • Pascal Bourguignon
      ... Emacs is THE editor for dummies. Yes, really. Just don t try to learn it all in 24h! Launch emacs, type C-h t (that is: control-h, then: t) and read the
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
        Matt writes:
        > I find myself dabbling in computer science at a ripe old age in my
        > spare time. As such, my time and brain power are at a premium, and I
        > don't relish the idea of learing anything along the lines of emacs
        > just to get my parentheses balanced. Is there any brave sould out
        > there willing to admit they use a "Scheme for Dummies" type editor,
        > and would you mind telling me what it is?

        Emacs is THE editor for dummies. Yes, really. Just don't try to learn
        it all in 24h!

        Launch emacs, type C-h t (that is: control-h, then: t) and read the
        tutorial. That's all you need to know, as a dummy, to use emacs.



        All right, I'll give you the very next step after the dummy stage.
        Type C-u M-x inferior-lisp RET /path/to/your/binary/of/scheme RET
        to launch your scheme within emacs.

        (The following step is clearly for less than dummies, so come back
        when you feel ready for it :-)

        --
        __Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/

        What is this talk of 'release'? Klingons do not make software 'releases'.
        Our software 'escapes' leaving a bloody trail of designers and quality
        assurance people in it's wake.
      • Dana Baguley
        If you just want to try Scheme, the editor that comes with PLT Scheme is adequate. I really highly recomend emacs, however. ... YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
          If you just want to try Scheme, the editor that comes with PLT Scheme
          is adequate. I really highly recomend emacs, however.

          On 4/1/06, Pascal Bourguignon <pjb@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Matt writes:
          > > I find myself dabbling in computer science at a ripe old age in my
          > > spare time. As such, my time and brain power are at a premium, and I
          > > don't relish the idea of learing anything along the lines of emacs
          > > just to get my parentheses balanced. Is there any brave sould out
          > > there willing to admit they use a "Scheme for Dummies" type editor,
          > > and would you mind telling me what it is?
          >
          >
          > Emacs is THE editor for dummies. Yes, really. Just don't try to learn
          > it all in 24h!
          >
          > Launch emacs, type C-h t (that is: control-h, then: t) and read the
          > tutorial. That's all you need to know, as a dummy, to use emacs.
          >
          >
          >
          > All right, I'll give you the very next step after the dummy stage.
          > Type C-u M-x inferior-lisp RET /path/to/your/binary/of/scheme RET
          > to launch your scheme within emacs.
          >
          > (The following step is clearly for less than dummies, so come back
          > when you feel ready for it :-)
          >
          > --
          > __Pascal Bourguignon__ http://www.informatimago.com/
          >
          > What is this talk of 'release'? Klingons do not make software 'releases'.
          > Our software 'escapes' leaving a bloody trail of designers and quality
          > assurance people in it's wake.
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Michael Micek
          ... I do most of my editting in vi, but I still use Emacs for messing around with Scheme. But then, I also learned the basic Emacs keybindings a long time
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
            On Sat, Apr 01, 2006 at 12:58:46PM +0200, Pascal Bourguignon wrote:

            > > As such, my time and brain power are at a premium, and I
            > > don't relish the idea of learing anything along the lines of emacs
            > > just to get my parentheses balanced. Is there any brave sould out
            > > there willing to admit they use a "Scheme for Dummies" type editor,
            > > and would you mind telling me what it is?

            I do most of my editting in vi, but I still use Emacs for
            messing around with Scheme. But then, I also learned the
            basic Emacs keybindings a long time ago. I am guessing by
            "for dummies" you probably mean "where C-a means 'select
            all' not 'go to the beginning of the line'"?

            > Launch emacs, type C-h t (that is: control-h, then: t) and read the
            > tutorial. That's all you need to know, as a dummy, to use emacs.

            There's also a page on the Community Scheme Wiki dedicated
            to getting up to speed on editting Scheme in Emacs as
            quickly as possible:

            http://community.schemewiki.org/?emacs-tutorial

            Hm. Needs work. Of course.
          • Philip Ansteth
            I concur that emacs is an excellent choice for someone just starting out. The other good choice for an editor is vi. I used vi for many years and am now
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 1, 2006
              I concur that emacs is an excellent choice for someone
              just starting out. The other good choice
              for an editor is vi. I used vi for many years and
              am now about five years into emacs.

              You should not skimp on editing skills. It's a
              mistake to look for shortcuts.

              I think Emacs is easier to learn than vi, and it
              ties you into a Lisp-aware culture in a way that
              vi does not.

              You have to choose one or the other: don't try to
              learn both. If I had it to do over again, I probably
              would not have taken the trouble to change from
              vi to emacs. But, having done so, I'm certainly not
              going to change back.

              Either way, try to train yourself NOT to use the mouse
              nor even the arrow keys unless you have to. A
              skilled touch typist with a powerful editor like emacs
              or vi is just a lot faster than somebody who depends
              on the mouse for most everything.

              Check out Dave Thomas's comments on editors in the
              book, The Pragmatic Programmer.

              Also, for a demo of what a skilled Emacs user can
              do, look at Marco Baringer's "hello-world.mov" at
              http://common-lisp.net/project/ucw/documentation.html.


              --- Michael Micek <zarchne@...> wrote:

              > On Sat, Apr 01, 2006 at 12:58:46PM +0200, Pascal
              > Bourguignon wrote:
              >
              > > > As such, my time and brain power are at a
              > premium, and I
              > > > don't relish the idea of learing anything along
              > the lines of emacs
              > > > just to get my parentheses balanced. Is there
              > any brave sould out
              > > > there willing to admit they use a "Scheme for
              > Dummies" type editor,
              > > > and would you mind telling me what it is?
              >
              > I do most of my editting in vi, but I still use
              > Emacs for
              > messing around with Scheme. But then, I also
              > learned the
              > basic Emacs keybindings a long time ago. I am
              > guessing by
              > "for dummies" you probably mean "where C-a means
              > 'select
              > all' not 'go to the beginning of the line'"?
              >
              > > Launch emacs, type C-h t (that is: control-h,
              > then: t) and read the
              > > tutorial. That's all you need to know, as a
              > dummy, to use emacs.
              >
              > There's also a page on the Community Scheme Wiki
              > dedicated
              > to getting up to speed on editting Scheme in Emacs
              > as
              > quickly as possible:
              >
              > http://community.schemewiki.org/?emacs-tutorial
              >
              > Hm. Needs work. Of course.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              > sicp-vsg-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >



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            • Michael.Thompson
              As Dana suggested the PLT DrScheme editor is probably the easiest path for beginners. Here are some screenshots:
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 3, 2006

                As Dana suggested the PLT DrScheme editor is probably the easiest path for beginners.

                 

                Here are some screenshots:

                http://www.plt-scheme.org/software/drscheme/tour/tour-Z-H-12.html#node_chap_11

                 

                However learning a powerful programmers editor like Emacs or Vi will pay dividends in short order. 

                 

                Best wishes,

                Mike Thompson

              • gene_sullivan
                ... I ll agree and disagree. I believe one of the best attitudes to take forward while attempting to learn *any* programming language is to `work smarter, not
                Message 7 of 7 , May 10 1:26 PM
                  --- In sicp-vsg@yahoogroups.com, Philip Ansteth <pansteth@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I concur that emacs is an excellent choice for someone
                  > just starting out. The other good choice
                  > for an editor is vi. I used vi for many years and
                  > am now about five years into emacs.
                  >
                  > You should not skimp on editing skills.
                  > It's a mistake to look for shortcuts.

                  I'll agree and disagree.
                  I believe one of the best attitudes to take
                  forward while attempting to learn *any*
                  programming language is to `work smarter, not
                  harder'. If one weren't interested in
                  manifesting this then why wouldn't one
                  just do *everything* manually rather than trying
                  to program a computer to do either some or most
                  of it?! I'm so lazy -- I mean `interested
                  in short cuts' -- that I hate writing a
                  program which `does something' when I
                  can write a program which writes a program
                  which does something. Pursuant to this
                  end I write lispoid symbolic expressions.
                  By `lispoid' I mean they are-qua-ARE
                  treated-as-if symbolic expressions in one
                  or more forms of Lisp or scheme (Scheme
                  as a dialect of Lisp). Given that one
                  may compose and evaluate lispoid expressions
                  via Emacs's elisp features AND emulate Vi
                  it strikes me as daft not to take the
                  shortcut also-known-as Emacs. While
                  working back and forth between ELisp and
                  scheme I have benefited in ways I undoubtedly
                  wouldn't have had I not had this `comparative
                  linguistics' lesson among Lisp family members.
                  To wit, is the following Elisp, or Scheme
                  or both?

                  (let
                  ((x 3)
                  (y 4)
                  )
                  (sqrt (+ (* x x) (* y y)))
                  )

                  So, I ask in closing, might it not be-qua-be
                  better to take the `short cut' through Emacs
                  to Scheme -- and possibly learn some polyglot
                  skills along the way -- than to (mis)use
                  some not-so-extensible `manual-manipulation-only'
                  text editor which doesn't promote the kinds
                  of thought processes re-applicable to Scheme
                  while using the editor?

                  > I think Emacs is easier to learn than vi, and it
                  > ties you into a Lisp-aware culture in a way that
                  > vi does not.

                  I agree. But there is something more important
                  in my estimation. Using Emacs promotes an
                  `aware' culture within ... an intrapersonal
                  culture which `thinks with' lisp_&_scheme
                  concepts.

                  <snipped for brevity>

                  > Either way, try to train yourself NOT to use the mouse
                  > nor even the arrow keys unless you have to.

                  Agreed whole heartedly.

                  > A skilled touch typist with a powerful editor like emacs
                  > or vi is just a lot faster than somebody who depends
                  > on the mouse for most everything.

                  Yes indeed.
                  And if one becomes mindful of the emacs functions
                  which are triggered by his or her keystrokes then
                  the writing of time_&_distracting_effort-saving
                  macros or/and elisp programs which `push the
                  bottons' ... thus improving on the efficiency
                  already gained by avoiding the mouse in favor
                  of the keyboard.

                  <snipped for brevity>

                  Cheers!
                  Gene
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