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Re: [shinlist] Re: just attended services.

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  • Rob Findlay
    ... One thing I did realize later while in the car, was that if the Buddha is golden, its going to reflect everyone who stands infront ot it the same way. It
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 8, 2004
      hpl_fan said:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "DAC Crowell"
      > <dacc@s...> wrote: > --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "Rob
      > Findlay" <rob@r...> > wrote:
      > > You'll be surprised the first few times that a good dharma talk
      > > sneaks up and WHACKS you in the back of the brain a couple of >
      > days after a service. The teachings in Jodo Shinshu are directed >
      > at the 'life-as-practice' level of thinking, so it always seems to me
      > > that these talks have a 'sneak dharma' aspect to them. You'll see
      > > what I mean...:)
      >
      > I like to think of that as the difference between looking and
      > seeing.  I have a saying I tell myself - "The Buddha can be
      > found where you don't look".  Hearing a teaching is one
      > thing, but finding what it means takes reflection which in turn comes
      > with seeing and not looking for the dharma in each thing/experience I
      > come in contact with throughout the day.  I often end up with
      > those "smack myself in the forehead" type of realizations -
      > "THAT's what such-and-such means!" because I'm finally seeing
      > a teching in something instead of looking for it's meaning.

      One thing I did realize later while in the car, was that if the Buddha is
      golden, its going to reflect everyone who stands infront ot it the same
      way. It doesn't waver in this reflection. I guess you could call that
      equality.


      Rob


      > >
      > > The wrist ojuzu are something of a 'personal statement of faith',
      > > actually. They're something that can stay with us at all times, to
      > > remind us at all times of Amida Buddha. And they also say
      > "this > is what I believe". Some (like ones I and Doreen
      > and lots of > others wear) also have a long 'bead' with the Nembutsu
      >
      > > inscribed on it. Mine sits next to my watch, on my left wrist,
      > where
      > > it serves as 'the other watch'...one tells me what time it is, and
      > > the other tells me to not be so concerned with what the first one
      > > just said.
      > >
      > > The others are more 'carried', and are more something for use in
      > > practice. Note, also, that a set of ojuzu are to be treated
      > > respectfully...either carried in a small purse-like pouch or in a
      > > jacket by the heart. The ojuzu, remember, has much 'encoded' >
      > into its symbolism that are items of our faith, so to treat the ojuzu
      > > with respect is a gesture of treating Amida Buddha with respect
      > > and, by extension via Nembutsu, treating yourself with respect as
      > > well.
      > >
      >
      > A very nice way of explaining people's treatment of their ojuzu.  I
      > wear one of a number of homemade ojuzu every day - I refer to them as
      > onenju to keep the difference between every-day use and more formal
      > sets.  Both types are precious to me as symbols and reminders.
      > While one could apply the same symbolism to any object - and as such
      > the bracelet itself it meaningless to me - the fact that it is such a
      > practical item is also a source of meaning for me.
      >
      > > > P.S. What is the proper pronunciation of "Namu Amida
      > Butsu"? > I took me a
      > > > while to realize that, that was what everyone was saying >
      > because it
      > > > soundss different then its written.
      > >
      > > Most people pronounce it like Doreen said
      > > "Na-mo-a-mi-da'-buts"...a little more emphasis on the
      > 'da'. I also > prefer "Wop-bop-a-lu-bop-a-wop-bam-boom!",
      > too, but that's just > my R&B jones getting filtered thru this
      > thing. ;) Anyway, there's > also the 'abbreviated' versions, which
      > also mean the same: "Na > man da bu" and also "Na man
      > da", which you hear people > sometimes repeating after the Eko
      > at the end of sutra chanting. > At MBT, the entire hondo buzzes very
      > low with this for 15-30 > seconds after the last gong-stroke. But in
      > all cases...the TRUE > pronunciation, when the Nembutsu is 'truly
      > spoken', is
      > > wordless...it is an expression of the meaning, "I place my
      > trust in > the Buddha of infinite wisdom and compassion", as
      > spoken > deep within the heart and mind, and this Nembutsu is beyond
      >
      > > the very word-sounds themselves. This is the one you always
      > > need to keep in mind.
      >
      > That you sooooo much!  I read the words and try to get the
      > pronunciation from listening to other people, but I was never even sure
      > I had heard the shortened versions correctly, let alone the full
      > Nembutsu.
      >
      >
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      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go
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      --
      Rob Findlay
      Homepage | http://robfindlay.org
      Blog | http://anarchyxero.robfindlay.org/
      --
      "For every dollar the boss has and didn't work for, one of us worked for a
      dollar and didn't get it."
      --Big Bill Haywood
    • DAC Crowell
      ... found ... finding ... and ... contact ... myself in ... such-and-such ... instead of ... Right, right...so many people think of Buddhism in terms of all
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 8, 2004
        --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "hpl_fan" <heeznow@m...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I like to think of that as the difference between looking and
        > seeing. I have a saying I tell myself - "The Buddha can be
        found
        > where you don't look". Hearing a teaching is one thing, but
        finding
        > what it means takes reflection which in turn comes with seeing
        and
        > not looking for the dharma in each thing/experience I come in
        contact
        > with throughout the day. I often end up with those "smack
        myself in
        > the forehead" type of realizations - "THAT's what
        such-and-such
        > means!" because I'm finally seeing a teching in something
        instead of
        > looking for it's meaning.

        Right, right...so many people think of Buddhism in terms of all
        sorts of teachings, etc which are of the 'accumulated knowledge'
        sort...scholarly stuff, etc. But the thing about Shin is this
        emphasis on dharma, practice, etc being a part of life, and
        vice-versa...I look at it as an asset because of how these
        teachings are living and dynamic, part of life itself. "Book
        learning" is one thing, but this sort of experiental approach to
        Buddha dharma is, I think, what makes these teachings so
        important to those of us who, like Shinran, are incapable of any
        sort of rigorous practice.

        Just as we are always surrounded by Amida's infinite wisdom
        and compassion, we are equally surrounded by Buddha
        dharma. So simple...yet so profound in that simplicity.

        Namuamidabutsu!

        Shaku Kyomei Ho / DAC Crowell
      • DAC Crowell
        ... Buddha is ... same ... that ... Sure...that s yet another way of approaching the same message. A good dharma talk is sort of like a koan. But while a koan
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 8, 2004
          --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Findlay" <rob@r...>
          wrote:
          >
          > One thing I did realize later while in the car, was that if the
          Buddha is
          > golden, its going to reflect everyone who stands infront ot it the
          same
          > way. It doesn't waver in this reflection. I guess you could call
          that
          > equality.

          Sure...that's yet another way of approaching the same message.

          A good dharma talk is sort of like a koan. But while a koan has a
          single, objective answer as a rule, these are the sort of 'koans'
          which have multiple and subjective answers. Just as each
          person is different, each different layer of such a message
          touches upon them in different ways. At the root, certainly, the
          intrinsic meanings are the same...but how we approach them,
          how we encounter and process this new (or
          seemingly-new-but-known-all-the-time) information, this is as
          different as fingerprints.

          The best example, perhaps, is the Nembutsu itself. Ogui-Sensei
          always said that the Nembutsu is perhaps the ultimate 'koan' in
          a Jodo Shinshu sense, because we can (and likely will) spend
          our lives understanding what "namu amida butsu" means. And
          he's right; for each moment, the meaning will be different, just as
          each moment is different. The sole constant there is that it IS
          there, the whole time, just as Amida Buddha is always there.

          Namuamidabutsu!

          Shaku Kyomei Ho / DAC Crowell
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