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Re: [shinlist] Re: Hi New to List + Question

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  • José Tirado
    Wow! As usual, DAC, you continue to surprise me. Your explanation/mini-Dharma talk was very, very nice. It´s a real pleasure hearing from you again... Just
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 7, 2004
      Wow!
      As usual, DAC, you continue to surprise me.  Your explanation/mini-Dharma talk was very, very nice.  It�s a real pleasure hearing from you again...
       
      Just a little side note on "emptiness"...
       
      There are very good reasons specific characters were chosen in the Chinese language to describe concepts taken from the very unrelated Sanskrit, in which so much of Buddhism was transmitted.  In this case, "emptiness" (sunyata) is important.  The character used, "ku" is the same one as in "sky".  This represents two important yet differing ways of describing the indescribable. 
       
      One can say the sky is "empty" of things, blank, with no-thing there.  This would be the negative description.  But one could also say that it is self-luminous, open, vast and filled with infinite potential; a positive description.  Neither captures the "experience" of "sky/emptiness" but both help in describing a bit what is "there".  Thus one ideogram or character can point the way to some ineffable experience and as a result, countless scholars thru the ages have emphasized one or the other aspects of "emptiness" either in a positive way (Vajrayana) or negative (most of Mahayana).
       
      Thought this might add a bit...
      In gassho,
      Jose (Shaku Kokai)
       
       


      "Thus, when one has boarded the ship of the Vow of great compassion and sailed out on the vast ocean of light, the winds of perfect virtue blow softly and the waves of evil are transformed. The darkness of ignorance is immediately broken through, and quickly reaching the land of immeasurable light, one realizes great nirvana and acts in accord with the virtue of Samantabhadra. Let this be known."
      --Shinran Shonin, KGSS II 72-78


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    • Doreen Kamada-Fujii
      ... That which is within is within the limit of self; that ... service ... than ... where ... as ... Just ... That was beautiful, DAC. I really envy the
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 7, 2004
        --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "DAC Crowell" <dacc@s...> wrote:

        That which is within is within the limit of self; that
        > which is other-power comes from any/everywhere and has no
        > limit.
        >
        > This sort of fits in with a dharma talk I'm working on for a
        service
        > next month in which I'll be talking about the principle of
        > emptiness. Looked at from the 'outside', most people regard this
        > as some sort of 'empty as in nothing there' emptiness. But the
        > reality is that this is an 'emptiness with a potential for becoming
        > filled'. And it is an emptiness that exists as a component of the
        > wisdom and compassion of Tathagata, since this emptiness
        > allows all to come into existance.
        >
        > When you hit the end of the tether of self-power, then ultimately
        > you arrive at this emptiness, everything else having been poured
        > out by your own agency. If mindfulness is present, then the
        > character of that emptiness can and will dictate what fills it. But
        > this isn't a conscious process; it simply 'has to occur' rather
        than
        > being something you can 'make happen'. And in this case, what
        > seems to have filled this 'potentiality' for you is the
        > 'name-which-calls', the Nembutsu.
        >
        > So after that experience which is also referred sometimes as the
        > 'deep hearing of Nembutsu', then the best way to proceed is
        > to...not proceed. At least, not on your volition. Simply follow
        where
        > the deep hearing leads, ringing clear and free in all that
        > newly-empty space. If it leads toward a deeper understanding of
        > Amida Buddha, then that is right. If elsewhere, then that is just
        as
        > right. Either will still happen through that 'sideways leap' of
        > intuition that happens best at times like this.
        >
        > Anyway, hopefully you'll find some writings of worth here in this
        > group in amongst all the other goings-on. There's some pretty
        > sharp cookies here when it comes to Amida, although the best
        > authority you're likely to find won't be in this list or any book.
        Just
        > keep listening...

        That was beautiful, DAC. I really envy the members at Midwest BT who
        will get to hear that talk next month; thank you so much for
        sharing...

        gassho,
        Doreen/Shaku ni Myo Jun
      • dragonwriter2
        Hi DAC Crowell, Thanks for your reply, it s certainly a keeper to be printed and read over. You re rigth there truly are posts/posters which/who are gems of
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 7, 2004
          Hi DAC Crowell,
          Thanks for your reply, it's certainly a keeper to be printed and
          read over.
          You're rigth there truly are posts/posters which/who are gems of the
          Dharma on this list :)

          With Lovingkindness,
          Simon L
        • DAC Crowell
          ... Definitely some considerable insight there, yep! Also consider...the sky, in the times when Dharma teaching was newer, was critical to life. Rain and sun
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 7, 2004
            --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "José" Tirado
            <nodozejoze@y...> wrote:
            > One can say the sky is "empty" of things, blank, with no-thing
            >there. This would be the negative description. But one could
            >also say that it is self-luminous, open, vast and filled with
            >infinite potential; a positive description. Neither captures the
            >"experience" of "sky/emptiness" but both help in describing a bit
            >what is "there". Thus one ideogram or character can point the
            >way to some ineffable experience and as a result, countless
            >scholars thru the ages have emphasized one or the other
            >aspects of "emptiness" either in a positive way (Vajrayana) or
            >negative (most of Mahayana).

            Definitely some considerable insight there, yep! Also
            consider...the sky, in the times when Dharma teaching was
            newer, was critical to life. Rain and sun that nurtures the land
            comes from the sky. But also, destructive elements...blizzards,
            storms, floods...also come from the very same sky. The
            _potential_ there is neutral, though...either may occur in its time.
            And ultimately, when you consider that in the light of the concept
            that there are no 'good' things and no 'bad' things, but merely
            'grateful' things...things we learn from. Hmmm....

            > Thought this might add a bit...

            Sho'nuff!

            Namuamidabutsu,
            Shaku Kyomei Hou DAC
          • Doreen Kamada-Fujii
            ... time. ... *cuts and pastes to word* :) This is the type of talk/discussion we have all too infrequently at our temple. I am so grateful for this list and
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 11, 2004
              --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "DAC Crowell" <dacc@s...> wrote:
              > --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "José" Tirado
              > <nodozejoze@y...> wrote:
              > > One can say the sky is "empty" of things, blank, with no-thing
              > >there. This would be the negative description. But one could
              > >also say that it is self-luminous, open, vast and filled with
              > >infinite potential; a positive description. Neither captures the
              > >"experience" of "sky/emptiness" but both help in describing a bit
              > >what is "there". Thus one ideogram or character can point the
              > >way to some ineffable experience and as a result, countless
              > >scholars thru the ages have emphasized one or the other
              > >aspects of "emptiness" either in a positive way (Vajrayana) or
              > >negative (most of Mahayana).
              >
              > Definitely some considerable insight there, yep! Also
              > consider...the sky, in the times when Dharma teaching was
              > newer, was critical to life. Rain and sun that nurtures the land
              > comes from the sky. But also, destructive elements...blizzards,
              > storms, floods...also come from the very same sky. The
              > _potential_ there is neutral, though...either may occur in its
              time.
              > And ultimately, when you consider that in the light of the concept
              > that there are no 'good' things and no 'bad' things, but merely
              > 'grateful' things...things we learn from. Hmmm....

              *cuts and pastes to word* :)

              This is the type of talk/discussion we have all too infrequently at
              our temple. I am so grateful for this list and the discussions
              here...:)

              gassho,
              Doreen/Shaku ni Myo Jun
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