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Re: [shinlist] note to Tai Unno

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  • ShinBuddhist@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/26/02 10:19:18 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... Personally, I consider Amida to be a mythical, not a historical character. I believe that
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 26, 2002
      In a message dated 11/26/02 10:19:18 AM Pacific Standard Time, bombu@... writes:

      I had previously asked you what Shin Buddhists have faith in if
      Amitabha, as described in the sutras, is a “fictional character”.  I confided my
      great interest in the “saving truth” but felt Amida would be useless to me (and
      other westerners) unless it could be seen to be a symbol for the reality of
      things as they are.

                   Personally, I consider Amida to be a mythical, not a historical character. I believe that there is an 'aspect' of the universe that can be described as light/wisdom and life/compassion. Amida, for me, symbolizes that reality quite well.

      Grasped,
      never to be abandoned,
      Ernesto.
    • Eric Jautee & family <eric.jauteev@wanad
      *** About a recent post declaring : Personally, I consider Amida to be a mythical, not a historical character. I believe that there is an aspect of the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 8, 2002
        *** About a recent post declaring :
        "Personally, I consider Amida to be a mythical, not a historical
        character. I believe that there is an 'aspect' of the universe that
        can be described as light/wisdom and life/compassion. Amida,
        for me, symbolizes that reality quite well.
        Ernesto." :
        *** this advice is fairly wise, but I add a few words about "a
        mythical, not a historical character".
        --It is clear that many compassionate Buddhas existed and will
        exist.
        --I see Amida as the personification of these vivid symbols of
        light, wisdom and compassion. It seems to me that honoring
        Amida is quite useful, because He is a wider symbol than solely
        the historical Shakyamuni. Honoring Amida is honoring
        Shakyamuni but also the other Buddhas, whose reality is clear.
        Honoring Amida gives thus to the Buddhism a wider realm,
        wider than honoring only a precise historical man.
        --So, I consider Amida as being neither a myth, nor a historical
        unique person, but a honored symbol of a wide realm of
        historical characters having realized their buddhahood.
        --Namu Amida Butsu.
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