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Dr. Bloom's Shin Study Course

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  • ShinBuddhist@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/25/02 10:55:12 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... Thanks for sharing your experience with Dr. Bloom s lessons on his website. I look forward
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 25, 2002
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      In a message dated 11/25/02 10:55:12 AM Pacific Standard Time, montcomd1@... writes:

      Shin Buddhism is very new to me, and I am glad to have an enjoyable
      and knowledgable tutor like Dr. Bloom to help me. I think you will
      enjoy Dr. Bloom's exposition. Hopefully it won't be to basic for you.



                   Thanks for sharing your experience with Dr. Bloom's lessons on his website. I look forward to checking it out. The first books that I ever saw and read regarding Shin Buddhism were Alfred Bloom's, Shinran's Gospel of Pure Grace, and, Strategies for Modern Living: A Commentary with the Text of the Tannisho. Nothing is too basic for me. Either I'll find something that I have previously missed or recall something that I have forgotten. Kenneth Tanaka's book, for example, is pretty basic, as it is intended as an introduction to those who know little or nothing about Buddhism in general and Shin in particular; and yet it is one of my favorite books, one that I have read numerous times.
                   I am glad that you decided to examine Shin Buddhism for yourself instead of taking the word of others about it. I has been my experience that when it comes to religion, one should always go to the source instead of relying on its followers or detractors. Like you, I am also a 'Scriptura Sola' kind of guy, having been influenced much by the Protestant tradition in that regard (I'm a 'recovering' fundamentalist Pentecostal!). In the case of Shin Buddhism, I consider the Writings of Shinran to be my 'Scriptura,' with the Writings of other saints like Honen, Shinran's teacher, and the sutras, as being auxiliary. Needless to say, this is not a tenet of Shin Buddhism (that I am aware of), but merely an expression of my personal preferences.

      Grasped,
      never to be abandoned,
      Ernesto.
    • Bombu
      On Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:53:23 EST ... I know what you mean, I ve read it a few times myself - River of Fire, River of Water is another I ve re-read quite a
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 25, 2002
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        On Mon, 25 Nov 2002 19:53:23 EST
        ShinBuddhist@... wrote:

        > Kenneth Tanaka's book, for example, is pretty basic, as it is
        > intended as an introduction to those who know little or nothing about
        > Buddhism in general and Shin in particular; and yet it is one of my
        > favorite books, one that I have read numerous times.
        >

        I know what you mean, I've read it a few times myself - "River of Fire,
        River of Water" is another I've re-read quite a bit. Can you tell me
        your other favourites and maybe why you liked them? I'm getting
        ready to order some more books and would appreciate your
        recommendations.

        Namo Amitabha
      • montcomd1
        Dear Ernesto (and all others who read this), Thank you for your nice comments on my readings in Shin Buddhism. My next book after River of Fire, River of
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 26, 2002
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          Dear Ernesto (and all others who read this),

          Thank you for your nice comments on my readings in Shin Buddhism. My
          next book after "River of Fire, River of Water" will be another book
          by Taitetsu Unno - "Shin Buddhism - Bits of Rubble Turn into Gold". I
          also have "The Tao of Physics" ready to read. That book is a look at
          the convergence of ancient Eastern mysticism and modern quantum
          physics. It looks to be fascinating. Read up on quantum physics
          (quarks et al.), and you will see an amazing similarity to ancient
          Buddhist descriptions of Samsara and Impermanence.

          I am still looking for a local sangha. I think that I might look at a
          Zen house sangha in Rockville MD. They look to be pleasant,
          nondoctrinal sort of people, and I could use a little meditation in
          my life. But the nembutsu too!!

          Sincerely, Mark

          --- In shinlist@y..., ShinBuddhist@a... wrote:
          > In a message dated 11/25/02 10:55:12 AM Pacific Standard Time,
          > montcomd1@y... writes:
          >
          > > Shin Buddhism is very new to me, and I am glad to have an
          enjoyable
          > > and knowledgable tutor like Dr. Bloom to help me. I think you
          will
          > > enjoy Dr. Bloom's exposition. Hopefully it won't be to basic for
          you.
          > >
          > >
          >
          > Thanks for sharing your experience with Dr. Bloom's
          lessons
          > on his website. I look forward to checking it out. The first books
          that I
          > ever saw and read regarding Shin Buddhism were Alfred Bloom's,
          Shinran's
          > Gospel of Pure Grace, and, Strategies for Modern Living: A
          Commentary with
          > the Text of the Tannisho. Nothing is too basic for me. Either I'll
          find
          > something that I have previously missed or recall something that I
          have
          > forgotten. Kenneth Tanaka's book, for example, is pretty basic, as
          it is
          > intended as an introduction to those who know little or nothing
          about
          > Buddhism in general and Shin in particular; and yet it is one of my
          favorite
          > books, one that I have read numerous times.
          > I am glad that you decided to examine Shin Buddhism
          for
          > yourself instead of taking the word of others about it. I has been
          my
          > experience that when it comes to religion, one should always go to
          the source
          > instead of relying on its followers or detractors. Like you, I am
          also a
          > 'Scriptura Sola' kind of guy, having been influenced much by the
          Protestant
          > tradition in that regard (I'm a 'recovering' fundamentalist
          Pentecostal!). In
          > the case of Shin Buddhism, I consider the Writings of Shinran to be
          my
          > 'Scriptura,' with the Writings of other saints like Honen,
          Shinran's teacher,
          > and the sutras, as being auxiliary. Needless to say, this is not a
          tenet of
          > Shin Buddhism (that I am aware of), but merely an expression of my
          personal
          > preferences.
          >
          > Grasped,
          > never to be abandoned,
          > Ernesto.
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