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Re: 21 questions about Buddhism

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  • Jason
    For me, I guess I don t like to worry so much about what will happen later. I believe that my job is to be the best that I can be in each moment, and the
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 2, 2004
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      For me, I guess I don't like to worry so much about what will happen
      later. I believe that my job is to be the best that I can be in each
      moment, and the future will take care of itself. I don't know what
      happens when I die, but do I really have to? When I am offered a
      chance to help a fellow human being, then I should help them because
      it is the right thing to do, not because it will affect my standing
      in the future. The goal of each moment leads me to my future.

      -Jason

      --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, Shin02143@a... wrote:
      >
      > In a message dated 9/16/04 5:39:35 AM, ady982@p... writes:
      >
      >
      > > 19) If someones believes in the Buddhist philosophy and way of
      life but
      > > rejects Buddhist mythology (karma,rebirth,gods,etc.) is he a
      > > Buddhist?
      > >
      > Just saw this and had a few thoughts.
      >
      > Hard to understand what you mean by "Buddhist philosophy" when you
      > refer to karma and rebirth as mythology. To Buddhists, karma and
      rebirth
      > are as real as the air we breathe. Believing in deities is not
      essential to
      > being Buddhist, in fact such beliefs are usually tacked on to
      Buddhist
      > practices, such as in Japan with its Shinto religion often side by
      side
      > with Buddhism. You might have asked, "Can one be a Buddhist by just
      > following the moral code of the Eightfold Noble Path?" That is a
      better
      > question. There are many Buddhists, especially in the West, who do
      not
      > believe in karma or rebirth but who follow the Eightfold Noble
      Path, at
      > least in so far as it defines a moral code of thought and behavior.
      Being
      > a Buddhist is not about what you believe or don't believe, it is
      how you
      > live your life. Some people find belief in deities comforting. It
      isn't
      > Buddhism per se, but they feel it contributes to their wellbeing
      just
      > the same. For people who have had a bad scrape with mystical
      > religion, the moral path of Buddhism may be enough for them,
      rejecting
      > all beliefs in deities or unincarnate entities. Like I said
      before, the
      > Buddha
      > taught the so-called "84,000 paths" to enlightenment, emphasizing
      how
      > different we are from one another and how our spiritual needs can
      vary
      > so much.
      >
      > gassho,
      > Rick
      > (Shaku Egen)
    • David Salyers
      Here a good link to a website by a Higashi Hongwanji temple in West Covina, CA that answers the very question you are asking from their perspective:
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 3, 2004
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        Here'a good link to a website by a Higashi Hongwanji temple in West
        Covina, CA that answers the very question you are asking from their
        perspective:

        http://www.livingdharma.org/Misconceptions.html

        --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jason" <jason@j...> wrote:
        > > > 19) If someones believes in the Buddhist philosophy and way of
        > life but
        > > > rejects Buddhist mythology (karma,rebirth,gods,etc.) is he a
        > > > Buddhist?
      • Heath McCarty
        One of the things that attracted me to Buddhism is that it is not dogmatic. I ve considered myself to be a Buddhist for quite a while now, but I don t just
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 3, 2004
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          One of the things that attracted me to Buddhism is that it is not dogmatic.  I've considered myself to be a Buddhist for quite a while now, but I don't just accept ideas of merit, karma, or rebirth simply because they're associated with Buddhism.  The Buddha himself exhorted his followers to find the truth for themselves (Kalama sutra) and to not just accept what was told to them by monks/teachers.  In my opinion, these concepts are peripheral.  What's central is a personal experience of awakening.  If you're not already familiar with it I highly recommend Stephen Batchelor's book "Buddhism Without Beliefs".   Heath

          David Salyers <salyed@...> wrote:

          Here'a good link to a website by a Higashi Hongwanji temple in West
          Covina, CA that answers the very question you are asking from their
          perspective:

          http://www.livingdharma.org/Misconceptions.html

          --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jason" <jason@j...> wrote:
          > > > 19) If someones believes in the Buddhist philosophy and way of
          > life but
          > > > rejects Buddhist mythology (karma,rebirth,gods,etc.) is he a
          > > > Buddhist?






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        • David Salyers
          Hi Heath, I agree 100% with you and I do know that it says the same thing that you are saying at the Living Dharma website which is from West Covina Buddhist
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 4, 2004
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            Hi Heath,

            I agree 100% with you and I do know that it says the same thing that
            you are saying at the "Living Dharma" website which is from West
            Covina Buddhist temple (Higashi Honganji) and it also says the same
            thing in the book "Ocean" by Kenneth Tanaka which is about Shin
            Buddhism.

            BTW, I really like Batchelor's book, although it drives my friends
            who are into Ch'an crazy (they tend to be a little more traditional
            in their beliefs).

            David

            --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, Heath McCarty <heathmccarty@y...>
            wrote:
            > One of the things that attracted me to Buddhism is that it is not
            dogmatic. I've considered myself to be a Buddhist for quite a while
            now, but I don't just accept ideas of merit, karma, or rebirth simply
            because they're associated with Buddhism. The Buddha himself
            exhorted his followers to find the truth for themselves (Kalama
            sutra) and to not just accept what was told to them by
            monks/teachers. In my opinion, these concepts are peripheral.
            What's central is a personal experience of awakening. If you're not
            already familiar with it I highly recommend Stephen Batchelor's
            book "Buddhism Without Beliefs". Heath
            >
            > David Salyers <salyed@y...> wrote:
            > Here'a good link to a website by a Higashi Hongwanji temple in West
            > Covina, CA that answers the very question you are asking from their
            > perspective:
            >
            > http://www.livingdharma.org/Misconceptions.html
            >
            > --- In shinlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jason" <jason@j...> wrote:
            > > > > 19) If someones believes in the Buddhist philosophy and way
            of
            > > life but
            > > > > rejects Buddhist mythology (karma,rebirth,gods,etc.) is he a
            > > > > Buddhist?
            >
            >
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