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Re: [SFTT] Digest Number 275

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  • uwrk
    I ve kept monitors as pets and can attest to their antics but this falls far short of anything approaching high intelligence. No reptile ever had a voluminous
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2003
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      I've kept monitors as pets and can attest to their antics but this
      falls far short of anything approaching high intelligence. No reptile
      ever had a voluminous brain.





      --- In sftt2@yahoogroups.com, antigray@c... wrote:
      > In a message dated 5/31/03 11:07:34 AM !!!First Boot!!!,
      > sftt2@yahoogroups.com writes:
      > > Uwrk wrote:
      > > Scientists can say this for certain despite over 200 million
      years
      > > of reptilian evolution. Why should things be different
      elsewhere? Our
      > > own solar system demonstates that there are either Earthlike
      > > conditions or no life. Reptiles lack the intelligence and
      endothermy
      > > necessary for a dynamic advancing civilization-or any at all.
      >
      > Some reptile species do exhibit surprising intelligence .
      > From: http://www.animalbehavior.org/ABS/Media/AbstractStatus.html
      > A young Komodo dragon will spontaneously mouth and paw at a
      Frisbee and
      > make other gestures that "would be considered play in a dog or
      cat," says
      > Gordon Burghardt of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.
      >
      > Behaviorists wrestling with the problem of describing and
      explaining play
      > haven't paid much attention to reptiles, Burghardt says. Yet for
      decades,
      > observers have recorded anecdotes of young Komodo dragons doing
      things
      > that lack obvious utility and suggest whimsical antics. When a
      Komodo
      > dragon egg hatched at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C.,
      Burghardt
      > jumped at the chance to make systematic observations as the
      youngster
      > grew up.
      > ...
      > Kraken typically nudged them with her snout, swiped at them with
      her paw,
      > and carried them around in her mouth. She treated them differently
      from
      > her food, and Burghardt says the tapes "disprove the view that
      object
      > play is just food-motivated predatory behavior."
      >
      > The tapes also show Kraken seemingly eager for social play. In one
      > session, she eased up behind caretaker Trooper Walsh, who managed
      to
      > stand almost still. Kraken then reached up to his rear pocket,
      pulled out
      > his handkerchief, and stood near him with it in her mouth. He
      reached to
      > grab it, and the two of them both pulled at it in what Burghardt
      says
      > looks, even to the trained eye, like someone playing tug-of-war
      with a
      > puppy. Play is a fascinating behavior that even most scientists
      view as
      > restricted to mammals and perhaps a few birds. This presentation
      will document
      > through description and experiment that the world's largest lizard
      species, the
      > Komodo dragon, can engage in sustained and complex play behavior.
      Such
      > observations on 'atypical' animals suggest that play behavior is an
      ancient phenomenon
      > and not one only associated with large brains and warm-blooded
      animals.
      >
      > Additionally, a "modern dinosaur," crows, are known to make and use
      tools.
      > Art
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • uwrk
      ... There s a big difference between senseless mooing and attempting to organize resistance to this putative rep domination of our world.
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 1, 2003
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        --- In sftt2@yahoogroups.com, antigray@c... wrote:
        > In a message dated 5/31/03 11:07:34 AM !!!First Boot!!!,
        > sftt2@yahoogroups.com writes:
        > > No real evidence for this. If they really owned it, you'd be
        > > silenced or dead by now.
        > >
        >
        > Do ranchers kill their cows for mooing too much? Not hardly.

        There's a big difference between senseless mooing and attempting to
        organize resistance to this putative rep domination of our world.
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • uwrk
        ... This makes no sense in view of the putative rep mo, inasmuch as modern humans are far more intelligent than previous hominids; an alleged food resource is
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 1, 2003
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          --- In sftt2@yahoogroups.com, antigray@c... wrote:
          > In a message dated 5/31/03 11:07:34 AM !!!First Boot!!!,
          > sftt2@yahoogroups.com writes:
          > > I would not agree that this is their home world.
          > > I believe that primative humans were here when
          > > they arrived and were genetically altered to become
          > > the humans of today.

          This makes no sense in view of the putative rep mo, inasmuch as
          modern humans are far more intelligent than previous hominids; an
          alleged food resource is not bred to be smarter. The grater
          inteligence or innovative capacity of homo sapiens suffices to
          explain its success at the expense of neanderthals.




          Yes they believe it is their
          > > home world but it is also our world. But they claim it
          > > as theirs. (They are aliens to us.) Their spiritual
          > > make up is different than ours.
          > >
          > > Gloria
          >
          > They positively are from Earth. If they were a completely alien
          species their
          > DNA would not be 97% similar to ours

          No reputable scientist would concurr.


          and they would not be able to breed the
          > human/Reptoid hybrids they do, or use us as a food resource. The
          building
          > blocks of out life that make up our bodies would poison them.
          > Art
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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