Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: recs for a comfortable bike?

Expand Messages
  • raphsperry
    I own a Pake urban bike, which I got from American Cyclery (Frederick and Stanyan)3 years ago. It was about $350 dollars, if I remember correctly, new, which
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 27, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I own a Pake urban bike, which I got from American Cyclery (Frederick and Stanyan)3 years ago. It was about $350 dollars, if I remember correctly, new, which is a pretty great price -- since I've had a lot of bikes stolen around town, I didn't want a pricier one. http://www.pakebikes.com/nunubatmobile.html It's kind of funny because Pake mostly makes messenger bikes, and this is really not that. IT has an external rear derailleur, but also a chainguard, which is a feature I really like. The folks at American warned me that the components were cheap which may be true, so far I've had to replace one of the wheels after a number of spokes broke.

      I also recommend the Bianchi Milano-- mine was a great bike for $650, until it got stolen. It has internal gears. For the bike seat, either way you'd just have to get the sturdiest rear rack they sell and screw it to the mounting posts on the frame. And if you're new to riding around the city I woudl definitely recommend puncture-resistant tires (the Maratohn or the Armadillo are both good in my experience), since flats do happen otherwise.

      Good luck!

      Raphael

      --- In sfbikingfamilies@yahoogroups.com, Lainie Motamedi <lmotamedi@...> wrote:
      >
      > Kind of random question- but I'm looking to upgrade my bike and would like
      > to find out if anyone has recommendations. I currently have a 10+ year old
      > mountain bike and am particularly interested in getting a step through bike
      > (otherwise known as a "girl" bike). Internal gears a plus (I think) and the
      > bike needs to be able to accommodate a bike seat. Any suggestions are most
      > welcome. Thanks, Lainie
      >
    • rodynrojas
      I can t recall who posted they were getting a device that allowed them to attach their child s bike to the back of their bike but I am very interested in
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 28, 2009
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        I can't recall who posted they were getting a device that allowed them to attach their child's bike to the back of their bike but I am very interested in hearing how it worked out. Can we get a post update?

        AL
      • phototouristclub
        It was me an we used a FollowMe (website http://www.followme-tandem.com/english/index.htm). We commute from home to school by bike for about 3 miles or so,
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 29, 2009
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          It was me an we used a FollowMe (website http://www.followme-tandem.com/english/index.htm). We commute from home to school by bike for about 3 miles or so, mostly through the park. It was working good especially for pick up, when I had to take along a 1 year old as well. Then day light savings time ended and it does not make sense for our kid to ride her own bike at night, even in the park. We are back to using an xtracycle for now.

          The big cons that we found are the cost, drag and weight. The cost as you know is high $400 bucks or something like that. The drag is more than using a piccolo or other attached bikes (still way better than a trailer). The weight of the unit after the kid's bike was detached was a bit much on my wife's roadish bike.

          Pros, your kid can ride along side of you when its safe, on her own bike. Your kid feels a huge sense of pride having her bike at school and riding her bike in places everyday. Your kid gets a feeling of what it is like to ride (when attached to your bike) in the city streets.

          Jury is still out, will we get another next spring?

          Hope this helps.




          --- In sfbikingfamilies@yahoogroups.com, "rodynrojas" <alhartsough@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > I can't recall who posted they were getting a device that allowed them to attach their child's bike to the back of their bike but I am very interested in hearing how it worked out. Can we get a post update?
          >
          > AL
          >
        • Jeremiah Moore
          The one I ve seen is Trail Gator: http://www.trail-gator.com/ Never ridden one, but have checked them out in person a couple of times at SF Bike Coalition
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 29, 2009
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            The one I've seen is Trail Gator:
            http://www.trail-gator.com/

            Never ridden one, but have checked them out in person a couple of times at SF Bike Coalition events (another parent/kid combo was riding with one).  I was favorably impressed with the build and stability. 

            Key thing is to be sure the child's bike has proper shape and space at the head tube (the part of the frame where the handlebars and stem passes through the main frame and connects to the front fork) to accomodate the mounting plate.  They call this part the reciever - see pic on this page:  http://www.trail-gator.com/accessories.htm

            -jeremiah




            On Sun, Nov 29, 2009 at 10:39 PM, phototouristclub <phototouristclub@...> wrote:
             

            It was me an we used a FollowMe (website http://www.followme-tandem.com/english/index.htm). We commute from home to school by bike for about 3 miles or so, mostly through the park. It was working good especially for pick up, when I had to take along a 1 year old as well. Then day light savings time ended and it does not make sense for our kid to ride her own bike at night, even in the park. We are back to using an xtracycle for now.

            The big cons that we found are the cost, drag and weight. The cost as you know is high $400 bucks or something like that. The drag is more than using a piccolo or other attached bikes (still way better than a trailer). The weight of the unit after the kid's bike was detached was a bit much on my wife's roadish bike.

            Pros, your kid can ride along side of you when its safe, on her own bike. Your kid feels a huge sense of pride having her bike at school and riding her bike in places everyday. Your kid gets a feeling of what it is like to ride (when attached to your bike) in the city streets.

            Jury is still out, will we get another next spring?

            Hope this helps.



            --- In sfbikingfamilies@yahoogroups.com, "rodynrojas" <alhartsough@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I can't recall who posted they were getting a device that allowed them to attach their child's bike to the back of their bike but I am very interested in hearing how it worked out. Can we get a post update?
            >
            > AL
            >




            --
            -----------------------------------------------------------
            jeremiah moore | SOUND | jmoore@...
            http://www.jeremiahmoore.com/





          • lmotamedi
            Thanks all for your suggestions for a comfy urban bike. I ended up getting a Globe Vienna from Mike s Bikes. Globe is a new brand to me but apparently it s
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 30, 2009
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks all for your suggestions for a comfy urban bike. I ended up getting a Globe Vienna from Mike's Bikes. Globe is a new brand to me but apparently it's Specialized line for the urban commuter. The Vienna can be ordered with a "step through" frame (otherwise known as a "girls" bike) and is not quite as upright as some of the other bikes I rode, although still much more upright than a typical mtn bike frame.

              Thanks again for all of your suggestions.

              And I do want to give a plug to Mike's Bikes on Howard Street. I went to quite a few stores and they were especially knowledgeable, helpful, and patient. Plus, they have a great selection of bikes.

              --- In sfbikingfamilies@yahoogroups.com, "raphsperry" <raphael@...> wrote:
              >
              > I own a Pake urban bike, which I got from American Cyclery (Frederick and Stanyan)3 years ago. It was about $350 dollars, if I remember correctly, new, which is a pretty great price -- since I've had a lot of bikes stolen around town, I didn't want a pricier one. http://www.pakebikes.com/nunubatmobile.html It's kind of funny because Pake mostly makes messenger bikes, and this is really not that. IT has an external rear derailleur, but also a chainguard, which is a feature I really like. The folks at American warned me that the components were cheap which may be true, so far I've had to replace one of the wheels after a number of spokes broke.
              >
              > I also recommend the Bianchi Milano-- mine was a great bike for $650, until it got stolen. It has internal gears. For the bike seat, either way you'd just have to get the sturdiest rear rack they sell and screw it to the mounting posts on the frame. And if you're new to riding around the city I woudl definitely recommend puncture-resistant tires (the Maratohn or the Armadillo are both good in my experience), since flats do happen otherwise.
              >
              > Good luck!
              >
              > Raphael
              >
              > --- In sfbikingfamilies@yahoogroups.com, Lainie Motamedi <lmotamedi@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Kind of random question- but I'm looking to upgrade my bike and would like
              > > to find out if anyone has recommendations. I currently have a 10+ year old
              > > mountain bike and am particularly interested in getting a step through bike
              > > (otherwise known as a "girl" bike). Internal gears a plus (I think) and the
              > > bike needs to be able to accommodate a bike seat. Any suggestions are most
              > > welcome. Thanks, Lainie
              > >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.