Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [seymouria] Hymenochirus boettgeri - A Living Relative of Vulcanobatrachus

Expand Messages
  • Neal Robbins
      Hi Tom,       You re welcome. As we know, frogs are quite ancient; they have been here since the Triassic. It shows how adept they are at surviving.
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 16, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
       
      Hi Tom,
       
          You're welcome. As we know, frogs are quite ancient; they have been here since the Triassic. It shows how adept they are at surviving. They made it through the mass extinction events that occurred at the ends of the Triassic and Cretaceous periods. I have seen several frogs outside during the past few nights.
       
          Neal

      From: Tom Johnson <fadingshadows40@...>
      To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 4:34 PM
      Subject: Re: [seymouria] Hymenochirus boettgeri - A Living Relative of Vulcanobatrachus
       
      Hi Neal, I was just talking about over on the Army Groups, saying we had over 4.5 inches of rain the past thirty hours, and frogs have come to life around here today. Your post was right on target this morning, buddy. Thanks.
      Tpm
      On Mon, Jul 15, 2013 at 9:24 PM, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
       
       
       
          These links have photos of Hymenochirus boettgeri.
       
       
       
          Hymenochirus boettgeri is a living relative of the Cretaceous frog Vulcanobatrachus. Both are in the superfamily Pipoidea. Hymenochirus boettgeri is a member of the family Pipidae.
          Hymenochirus boettgeri is native to Africa. It is found in Cameroon, Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea, the Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Hymenochirus resides in ponds, streams, and shallow creeks. It inhabits flooded areas during the rainy season.
          Hymenochirus boettgeri is up to (2.5 inches) in length. Females are larger than males. The coloration is brown or gray with many small spots. The head of Hymenochirus boettgeri is narrow and has a pointed snout. The arms and legs are thin.
          Hymenochirus boettgeri is a suction feeder. It eats insects and small fish fry. There are lateral lines that go down the length of body and undersides. This enables Hymenochirus boettgeri to sense movements and vibrations in the water. The sense of smell and sensitive fingers are also used to detect prey.
          Mating generally takes place at night. The male and the female perform amplexus when they mate. The male grasps the female around her abdomen just in front of the hind legs. She emits an egg and the male releases her. The male emits chemicals that externally fertilize the egg. While this is occurring, the female swims to the bottom. Then she comes back up and amplexus is repeated. The cycle continues until all of the eggs have been emitted and externally fertilized. 
          These publications are references:
       
      http://aquaticfrogs.tripod.com/ Species of the African Dwarf Frog
       
      Hymenochirus boettgeri. 2006. IUCN Red List
          
          Neal Robbins
    • Tom Johnson
      It came in okay for me, Garrett. I think any predator will scavenge when given the opportunity. T-rex is no exception. Why would it pass up a meal it didn t
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 16, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        It came in okay for me, Garrett. I think any predator will scavenge when given the opportunity. T-rex is no exception. Why would it pass up a meal it didn't have to chase?
        Tom


        On Tue, Jul 16, 2013 at 5:09 PM, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:
         

        I thought the following news might be of interest to some. But I hope the article comes up better on your screen than it did mine, altho, I suspect the problem is the posters. Lots of typos and missing info. But here it is:
         
         
        Garrett


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.