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Bravoceratops - A Ceratopsian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous

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  • Neal Robbins
       This link has an illustration of Chasmosaurus, which is closely related to Bravoceratops. Both are in the subfamily Chasmosauinae. The image gives an idea
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 3, 2013
       
         This link has an illustration of Chasmosaurus, which is closely related to Bravoceratops. Both are in the subfamily Chasmosauinae. The image gives an idea of how Bravoceratops would have looked.
       
          Bravoceratops was a ceratopsian dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
       
      Dinosauria Owen 1842
      Ornithischia Seeley 1887
      Cerapoda Sereno 1986
      Marginocephalia Sereno 1986
      Ceratopsia Marsh 1890
      Ceratopsidae Marsh 1890
      Chasmosaurinae Lambe 1915
      Bravoceratops Wick and Lehman 2013
      Bravoceratops polyphemus Wick and Lehman 2013
       
       
          Fossil remains of Bravoceratops were found in the Javelina Formation in West Texas. They date to the Maastrichtian age (70.6 - 65.5 million years ago) of the Cretaceous.
          Steven L. Wick and Thomas M. Lehman wrote an article titled A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian)of West Texas and implications for chasmosaurine phylogeney. This quote from the abstract says:
       
      Bravoceratops polyphemus gen. et sp. nov. is a large chasmosaurine ceratopsid from the lowermost part of the Javelin Formation(early Maastrichtian) of Big Bend National Park, TX, USA. B. polyphemus has a distinctive narrow snout, a long fenestrate fril, and fan-shaped median parietal bar with midline epiparietal on its posterior margin, as well as symmetrical depression on its dorsal surface at the nexus of the parietal rami. This depression is interpreted to be the attachment point for a second midline epiparietal. This parietal morphology is distinct from that exhibited by Anchiceratops or Pentaceratops. The posterior midline epiparietal in B. polyphemus and its bifurcated quadratojugal-squamosal joint are features shared with the most derived chasmosaurines, Torosaurus and Triceratops. The combinations of primitive and derived traits exhibited by B. polyphemus and its stratigraphic position, is compatible with the graduate transition from basal, to intermediate, to derived chasmosaurines observed throughout the western interior of North America and with phylogenetic analysis, which suggests that Bravoceratops may be closely related to Coahuilaceratops.
       
          Neal Robbins
    • uwtd@sbcglobal.net
      Great post. And good to see you back; seems you were offline a few days.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 4, 2013
        Great post. And good to see you back; seems you were offline a few days.

        --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >    This link has an illustration of Chasmosaurus, which is closely related to Bravoceratops. Both are in the subfamily Chasmosauinae. The image gives an idea of how Bravoceratops would have looked.
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chasmosaurus_BW.jpg
        >
        >     Bravoceratops was a ceratopsian dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
        >
        > Dinosauria Owen 1842
        > Ornithischia Seeley 1887
        > Cerapoda Sereno 1986
        > Marginocephalia Sereno 1986
        > Ceratopsia Marsh 1890
        > Ceratopsidae Marsh 1890
        > Chasmosaurinae Lambe 1915
        > Bravoceratops Wick and Lehman 2013
        > Bravoceratops polyphemus Wick and Lehman 2013
        >
        >
        >     Fossil remains of Bravoceratops were found in the Javelina Formation in West Texas. They date to the Maastrichtian age (70.6 - 65.5 million years ago) of the Cretaceous.
        >     Steven L. Wick and Thomas M. Lehman wrote an article titled A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian)of West Texas and implications for chasmosaurine phylogeney. This quote from the abstract says:
        >
        >
        >     Neal Robbins
        >
      • fadingshadows2000
        I hope you haven t been sick, Neal. I ve been so busy I really hadn t noticed you were missing. Sorry bout that, buddy. Tom
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 4, 2013
          I hope you haven't been sick, Neal. I've been so busy I really hadn't noticed you were missing. Sorry 'bout that, buddy.
          Tom

          --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...> wrote:
          >
          > Great post. And good to see you back; seems you were offline a few days.
          >
          > --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >    This link has an illustration of Chasmosaurus, which is closely related to Bravoceratops. Both are in the subfamily Chasmosauinae. The image gives an idea of how Bravoceratops would have looked.
          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chasmosaurus_BW.jpg
          > >
          > >     Bravoceratops was a ceratopsian dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
          > >
          > > Dinosauria Owen 1842
          > > Ornithischia Seeley 1887
          > > Cerapoda Sereno 1986
          > > Marginocephalia Sereno 1986
          > > Ceratopsia Marsh 1890
          > > Ceratopsidae Marsh 1890
          > > Chasmosaurinae Lambe 1915
          > > Bravoceratops Wick and Lehman 2013
          > > Bravoceratops polyphemus Wick and Lehman 2013
          > >
          > >
          > >     Fossil remains of Bravoceratops were found in the Javelina Formation in West Texas. They date to the Maastrichtian age (70.6 - 65.5 million years ago) of the Cretaceous.
          > >     Steven L. Wick and Thomas M. Lehman wrote an article titled A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian)of West Texas and implications for chasmosaurine phylogeney. This quote from the abstract says:
          > >
          > >
          > >     Neal Robbins
          > >
          >
        • Neal Robbins
          Hi Tom,     I haven t been sick; the computer that I had been using is not working. I m using a computer at the Dover public library now. I can make this
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 4, 2013
            Hi Tom,
                I haven't been sick; the computer that I had been using is not working. I'm using a computer at the Dover public library now. I can make this comment in relation to the ceratopsian post. That new ceratopsian shows further evidence of how numerous and diverse that ceratopsian dinosaurs were during the Cretaceous. They were quite common in North America and Asia, but apparently far less plentiful in Europe. Akjuceratops is the only known European ceratopsian.
             
                Neal

            From: fadingshadows2000 <fadingshadows40@...>
            To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 10:34 AM
            Subject: [seymouria] Re: Bravoceratops - A Ceratopsian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous
             
            I hope you haven't been sick, Neal. I've been so busy I really hadn't noticed you were missing. Sorry 'bout that, buddy.
            Tom

            --- In mailto:seymouria%40yahoogroups.com, "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...> wrote:
            >
            > Great post. And good to see you back; seems you were offline a few days.
            >
            > --- In mailto:seymouria%40yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >    This link has an illustration of Chasmosaurus, which is closely related to Bravoceratops. Both are in the subfamily Chasmosauinae. The image gives an idea of how Bravoceratops would have looked.
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chasmosaurus_BW.jpg
            > >
            > >     Bravoceratops was a ceratopsian dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
            > >
            > > Dinosauria Owen 1842
            > > Ornithischia Seeley 1887
            > > Cerapoda Sereno 1986
            > > Marginocephalia Sereno 1986
            > > Ceratopsia Marsh 1890
            > > Ceratopsidae Marsh 1890
            > > Chasmosaurinae Lambe 1915
            > > Bravoceratops Wick and Lehman 2013
            > > Bravoceratops polyphemus Wick and Lehman 2013
            > >
            > >
            > >     Fossil remains of Bravoceratops were found in the Javelina Formation in West Texas. They date to the Maastrichtian age (70.6 - 65.5 million years ago) of the Cretaceous.
            > >     Steven L. Wick and Thomas M. Lehman wrote an article titled A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian)of West Texas and implications for chasmosaurine phylogeney. This quote from the abstract says:
            > >
            > >
            > >     Neal Robbins
            > >
            >

          • Neal Robbins
                  Hi Joe,     I was offline. I ve been using the computer of public library. This library is closed on weekends.       Neal
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 4, 2013
               
                  Hi Joe,
                  I was offline. I've been using the computer of public library. This library is closed on weekends.
               
                  Neal

              From: "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...>
              To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 7:00 AM
              Subject: [seymouria] Re: Bravoceratops - A Ceratopsian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous
               
              Great post. And good to see you back; seems you were offline a few days.

              --- In mailto:seymouria%40yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >    This link has an illustration of Chasmosaurus, which is closely related to Bravoceratops. Both are in the subfamily Chasmosauinae. The image gives an idea of how Bravoceratops would have looked.
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chasmosaurus_BW.jpg
              >
              >     Bravoceratops was a ceratopsian dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
              >
              > Dinosauria Owen 1842
              > Ornithischia Seeley 1887
              > Cerapoda Sereno 1986
              > Marginocephalia Sereno 1986
              > Ceratopsia Marsh 1890
              > Ceratopsidae Marsh 1890
              > Chasmosaurinae Lambe 1915
              > Bravoceratops Wick and Lehman 2013
              > Bravoceratops polyphemus Wick and Lehman 2013
              >
              >
              >     Fossil remains of Bravoceratops were found in the Javelina Formation in West Texas. They date to the Maastrichtian age (70.6 - 65.5 million years ago) of the Cretaceous.
              >     Steven L. Wick and Thomas M. Lehman wrote an article titled A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian)of West Texas and implications for chasmosaurine phylogeney. This quote from the abstract says:
              >
              >
              >     Neal Robbins
              >

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