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Re: [seymouria] Article on Allosaurus

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  • Tom Johnson
    hahaha I like the sound effects on that page with the illustration. Thanks, Neal!!! Tom
    Message 1 of 4 , May 22, 2013
      hahaha
      I like the sound effects on that page with the illustration. Thanks, Neal!!!
      Tom


      On Wed, May 22, 2013 at 11:13 AM, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
       

       
       
          This link has a piece of artwork that depicts Allosaurus.
       
          A photo of an Allosaurus sculpture is on this link.
       
          Allosaurus fragilis was a theropod dinosaur of the Jurassic. The systematic paleontology of Allosaurus is:
       
      Dinosauria Owen 1842
      Saurischia Seeley 1887
      Theropoda Marsh 1881
      Allosauroidea Currie and Zhao 1994
      Allosauridae Marsh Marsh 1878
      Allosaurinae Marsh 1877
      Allosaurus Marsh 1877
      Allosaurus fragilis Marsh 1877
       
          Eric Snively, John R. Cotton, Ryan Ridgely, and Lawrence M. Witmer wrote an article titled Multibody dynamics model of head and neck function in Allosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda). It was published in 2013 in Palaeontologica Electronica, Vol. 16, Issue 2, 11A. The complete text is on this link.
       
          Neal Robbins


    • Neal Robbins
            You re welcome, Tom. Allosaurus is one of the most famous theropod dinosaurs. It was quite a hunter. The size of Allosaurus made it very spectacular.
      Message 2 of 4 , May 22, 2013
         
            You're welcome, Tom. Allosaurus is one of the most famous theropod dinosaurs. It was quite a hunter. The size of Allosaurus made it very spectacular. As we know, it was one of the heavyweights.
         
            Neal

        From: Tom Johnson <fadingshadows40@...>
        To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2013 11:15 AM
        Subject: Re: [seymouria] Article on Allosaurus
         
        hahaha
        I like the sound effects on that page with the illustration. Thanks, Neal!!!
        Tom
        On Wed, May 22, 2013 at 11:13 AM, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
         
         
         
            This link has a piece of artwork that depicts Allosaurus.
        http://dinosauria.tripod.com/Allosaurus.html
         
            A photo of an Allosaurus sculpture is on this link.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Allosaurus_in_Baltow_20060916_1500.jpg
         
            Allosaurus fragilis was a theropod dinosaur of the Jurassic. The systematic paleontology of Allosaurus is:
         
        Dinosauria Owen 1842
        Saurischia Seeley 1887
        Theropoda Marsh 1881
        Allosauroidea Currie and Zhao 1994
        Allosauridae Marsh Marsh 1878
        Allosaurinae Marsh 1877
        Allosaurus Marsh 1877
        Allosaurus fragilis Marsh 1877
         
            Eric Snively, John R. Cotton, Ryan Ridgely, and Lawrence M. Witmer wrote an article titled Multibody dynamics model of head and neck function in Allosaurus (Dinosauria, Theropoda). It was published in 2013 in Palaeontologica Electronica, Vol. 16, Issue 2, 11A. The complete text is on this link.
        http://palaeo-electronica.org/content/2013/389-allosaurus-feeding
         
            Neal Robbins
      • Neal Robbins
              This link has a piece of artwork that depicts Allosaurus.http://dinosauria.tripod.com/Allosaurus.html     A photo of an Allosaurus sculpture is
        Message 3 of 4 , May 28, 2017



           

              This link has a piece of artwork that depicts Allosaurus.
           
              A photo of an Allosaurus sculpture is on this link.
           
              Allosaurus fragilis was a theropod dinosaur of the Jurassic. The systematic paleontology of Allosaurus is:
           
          Dinosauria Owen 1842
          Saurischia Seeley 1887
          Theropoda Marsh 1881
          Allosauroidea Currie and Zhao 1994
          Allosauridae Marsh Marsh 1878
          Allosaurinae Marsh 1877
          Allosaurus Marsh 1877
          Allosaurus fragilis Marsh 1877
          A. europaeus Mateus et al. 2006
          A. lucasi Dalman 2014

              Fossil remains of the species of Allosaurus have been found in the Morrison Formation in Colorado and Wyoming. They date to the Kimmeridgian (157.3 - 152.1 million years ago) and Tithonian (152.1 - 145 million years ago) of the Jurassic.
              Allosaurus had a maximum known length of about 9.7 m. (31.8 feet). Its weight is estimated at around 2.3 tonnes (2.5 tons). This dinosaur had three fingers on each of its hands. A pair of horns was situated above and in front of the eyes. Lower paired ridges went along the top edges of the nasal bones that led into the horns. Allosaurus was indeed a powerful predator. It coexisted with sauropod dinosaurs, such as Diplodocus, Apatosaurus, and Brontosaurus. Allosaurus is thought to have hunted in groups when going after those large sauropods. Carnotarus was a predatory theropod that lived in the same environment as Allosaurus.
              Andrea Cau and Paolo Serventi wrote an article titled Origin attachments of the caudofemoralis longus muscle in the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus. It was published in 2017 in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 62(2): 273-277. This quote from the abstract says:

          The caudofemoralis longus muscle (CFL) is the primary limb retractor among non-avian sauropsids, and underwent a dramatic reduction along the dinosaur lineage leading to birds. The osteological correlates of the CFL among fossil reptiles have been controversial, because, contrary to traditional interpretations, the extent of the muscle is not necessarily related to the distribution of the caudal ribs. In some Cretaceous dinosaurs, the extent of the CFL has been inferred based on the preserved bony septa between the CFL and other tail muscles. Here, we describe a series of tail vertebrae of the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus, each showing a previously-unreported feature: a sulcus, formed by a regular pattern of tightly packed horizontal slits, that runs vertically along the lateral surfaces of the centra and neural arches. These sulci are interpreted as the origin attachment sites of the CFL, allowing for direct determination of the muscle extent along the tail of this dinosaur. Anteriorly to the 18th caudal vertebra, the sulcus runs along most of the centrum and neural arch, then it progressively reduces its vertical extent, and disappears between caudals 24 and 32, a pattern consistent with previous CFL reconstructions in other theropods.

              The abstract is on this link, along with a PDF caption. Clicking on PDF will open up the complete text.



              Neal Robbins
           


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