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Tarchia - An Ankylosaurian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous

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  • Neal Robbins
        This link has an illustration of Tarchia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tarchia_0473.JPG     Tarchia gigantea was a dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2013

          This link has an illustration of Tarchia.

          Tarchia gigantea was a dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:

      Dinosauria Owen 1842
      Ornithischia Seeley 1887
      Thyreophora Nopcsa
      Ankylosauria Osborn 1923
      Ankylosauridae Brown 1908
      Tarchia Maryanska 1977
      Tarchia gigantea Maryanska 1977=Dyoplosaurus giganteus Maleev 1956

          Tarchia had a body length of 8-8.5 m. (26-27 feet). The skull was about 40 cm. (1.3 ft.) long and 45 cm. (1.5 ft.) wide.
          The holotype (PIN 551-29) is a set of postcrania. It was found in the Nemegt Formation at the Nemegtu Mountain locality in Omnogov, Mongolia. This fossil specimen was unearthed in strata dating to a Campanian-Maastrichtian span of 83.5 - 65.5 million years ago. Other remains of this interval were discovered in the Nemegt Formation at Altan Ula IV, site 1 and the Khermeen Tsav locality in Omnogov, Mongolia. Some fossil remains were found in the Barun Goyot Formation in the Nemegt Basin in Mongolia. They are dated to the Campanian age (83.5 - 70.6 million years ago) of the Cretaceous. [Note - The source of this information is The Paleobiology Database.]
          Victoria M. Arbour, Nicolai L. Lech-Hernes, Tom E. Guldberg, Jorn H. Hurum, and Philip J. Currie wrote an article titled An ankylosauris dinosaur from Mongolia with in situ armour and keratinous scale impressions. It was published in 2013 in Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 58(1): 55-64. The complete text is on this link.

          Neal Robbins
    • uwtd@sbcglobal.net
      Fascinating Neal. I think this should also go to FFD, including the link to the paper. I may have more to say about this later. :)
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2013
        Fascinating Neal. I think this should also go to FFD, including the link to the paper. I may have more to say about this later. :)

        --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
        >>
        >
        >     Tarchia gigantea was a dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
        >
        > Dinosauria Owen 1842
        > Ornithischia Seeley 1887
        > Thyreophora Nopcsa
        > Ankylosauria Osborn 1923
        > Ankylosauridae Brown 1908
        > Tarchia gigantea Maryanska 1977=Dyoplosaurus giganteus Maleev 1956
        >
        > http://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app58/app20110081.pdf
        >
        >
        >     Neal Robbins
        >
      • Neal Robbins
            Thanks, Tim; we can have some discussion about it. This ankylosaurs was a very large one.      Neal ________________________________ From:
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2013

              Thanks, Tim; we can have some discussion about it. This ankylosaurs was a very large one. 

              Neal


          From: "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...>
          To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, March 1, 2013 7:20 AM
          Subject: [seymouria] Re: Tarchia - An Ankylosaurian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous

           

          Fascinating Neal. I think this should also go to FFD, including the link to the paper. I may have more to say about this later. :)

          --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins wrote:
          >>
          >
          >     Tarchia gigantea was a dinosaur of the Cretaceous. The systematic paleontology of it is:
          >
          > Dinosauria Owen 1842
          > Ornithischia Seeley 1887
          > Thyreophora Nopcsa
          > Ankylosauria Osborn 1923
          > Ankylosauridae Brown 1908
          > Tarchia gigantea Maryanska 1977=Dyoplosaurus giganteus Maleev 1956
          >
          > http://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app58/app20110081.pdf
          >
          >
          >     Neal Robbins
          >



        • uwtd@sbcglobal.net
          My pleasure, Neal. We ve sure had a great discussion about it in FFD. (http://ffd2009.multiply.com/)I ll reiterate here that the study is based on material
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 2, 2013
            My pleasure, Neal. We've sure had a great discussion about it in FFD. (http://ffd2009.multiply.com/)I'll reiterate here that the study is based on material discovered many years ago and doesn't include newer material found in the 1990s. It appears, however, that the older material is the best, and once described, quite revealing.

            Tarchia was indeed big the biggest Asiatic ankylosaurid although Hanwulosaurus IF real, might've been even bigger.

            --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >     Thanks, Tim; we can have some discussion about it. This ankylosaurs was a very large one. 
            >
            >     Neal
            >
            >
            > ________________________________> Sent: Friday, March 1, 2013 7:20 AM
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Tom Johnson
            Hi Tim, great article. If you haven t done so yet, please add a link to your webpage in our Link s section so it will be easy for the rest of us to find you.
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 2, 2013
              Hi Tim, great article. If you haven't done so yet, please add a link to your webpage in our Link's section so it will be easy for the rest of us to find you.
              Tom

              On Sat, Mar 2, 2013 at 8:59 AM, uwtd@... <uwtd@...> wrote:
               

              My pleasure, Neal. We've sure had a great discussion about it in FFD. (http://ffd2009.multiply.com/)I'll reiterate here that the study is based on material discovered many years ago and doesn't include newer material found in the 1990s. It appears, however, that the older material is the best, and once described, quite revealing.

              Tarchia was indeed big the biggest Asiatic ankylosaurid although Hanwulosaurus IF real, might've been even bigger.

              --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >     Thanks, Tim; we can have some discussion about it. This ankylosaurs was a very large one. 
              >
              >     Neal
              >
              >
              > ________________________________> Sent: Friday, March 1, 2013 7:20 AM
              > >
              > >
              >


            • Neal Robbins
                   Thanks, Tim; I m glad you posted this reply in seymouria. As we discussed in the FFD thread, Tarbosaurus was a theropod that co-existed with Tarchia
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 2, 2013

                     Thanks, Tim; I'm glad you posted this reply in seymouria. As we discussed in the FFD thread, Tarbosaurus was a theropod that co-existed with Tarchia and went after it. Making a frontal attack would have been a key factor in the attack strategy of Tarbosaurus. That would have enabled Tarbosaurus to avoid getting hit by the tail of Tarchia.

                    Neal


                From: "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...>
                To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2013 8:59 AM
                Subject: [seymouria] Re: Tarchia - An Ankylosaurian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous

                 
                My pleasure, Neal. We've sure had a great discussion about it in FFD. (http://ffd2009.multiply.com/)I'll reiterate here that the study is based on material discovered many years ago and doesn't include newer material found in the 1990s. It appears, however, that the older material is the best, and once described, quite revealing.

                Tarchia was indeed big the biggest Asiatic ankylosaurid although Hanwulosaurus IF real, might've been even bigger.

                --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                >     Thanks, Tim; we can have some discussion about it. This ankylosaurs was a very large one. 
                >
                >     Neal
                >
                >
                > ________________________________> Sent: Friday, March 1, 2013 7:20 AM
                > >
                > >
                >



              • uwtd@sbcglobal.net
                Hi guys, I just added FFD to the links section as requested. As for the putative attack strategy of Tarbosaurus see my latest, revised comment. Ankylosaurids
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 3, 2013
                  Hi guys, I just added FFD to the links section as requested. As for the putative attack strategy of Tarbosaurus see my latest, revised comment. Ankylosaurids like Tarchia evolved to counter this approach albeit not always successfully.

                  --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >      Thanks, Tim; I'm glad you posted this reply in seymouria. As we discussed in the FFD thread, Tarbosaurus was a theropod that co-existed with Tarchia and went after it. Making a frontal attack would have been a key factor in the attack strategy of Tarbosaurus. That would have enabled Tarbosaurus to avoid getting hit by the tail of Tarchia.
                  >
                  >     Neal
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...>
                  > To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2013 8:59 AM
                  > --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins > >
                  >
                • Neal Robbins
                      Hi Tim, I m glad that you added the link. I looked at your comment in the thread about Tarchia on the FFD board. You stated a good point about Tarchia
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 3, 2013

                        Hi Tim, I'm glad that you added the link. I looked at your comment in the thread about Tarchia on the FFD board. You stated a good point about Tarchia turning its head to avoid attacks on its head. I made a reply that Tarchia would have had enough maneuverability to do that. I also mentioned that if more than one Tarbosaurus was involved in the assault on Tarchia, then Tarchia would have been at a disadvantage. Of course, that would not have been the usual scenario, since Tarbosaurus did not use pack hunting as its normal strategy.

                        Neal


                    From: "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...>
                    To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, March 3, 2013 7:02 AM
                    Subject: [seymouria] Re: Tarchia - An Ankylosaurian Dinosaur of the Cretaceous

                     
                    Hi guys, I just added FFD to the links section as requested. As for the putative attack strategy of Tarbosaurus see my latest, revised comment. Ankylosaurids like Tarchia evolved to counter this approach albeit not always successfully.

                    --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >      Thanks, Tim; I'm glad you posted this reply in seymouria. As we discussed in the FFD thread, Tarbosaurus was a theropod that co-existed with Tarchia and went after it. Making a frontal attack would have been a key factor in the attack strategy of Tarbosaurus. That would have enabled Tarbosaurus to avoid getting hit by the tail of Tarchia.
                    >
                    >     Neal
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: "uwtd@..."
                    > To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2013 8:59 AM
                    > --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins > >
                    >



                  • uwtd@sbcglobal.net
                    As I just posted in FFD (last comment) some evidence suggests Tarbosaurus did hunt cooperatively or with others of its kind.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 4, 2013
                      As I just posted in FFD (last comment) some evidence suggests Tarbosaurus did hunt cooperatively or with others of its kind.

                      --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >     Hi Tim, I'm glad that you added the link. I looked at your comment in the thread about Tarchia on the FFD board. You stated a good point about Tarchia turning its head to avoid attacks on its head. I made a reply that Tarchia would have had enough maneuverability to do that. I also mentioned that if more than one Tarbosaurus was involved in the assault on Tarchia, then Tarchia would have been at a disadvantage. Of course, that would not have been the usual scenario, since Tarbosaurus did not use pack hunting as its normal strategy.
                      >
                      >     Neal
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: "uwtd@..." <uwtd@...>
                      > To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Sunday, March 3, 2013 7:02 AM
                      > Subject: [seymouria] Re: Tarchia - An Ankylosaurian Dinosaur of the Cre>
                      > --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Ro> >
                      > >     Neal
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: "uwtd@"
                      > > To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2013 8:59 AM
                      > > --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins > >
                      > >
                      >
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