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a dinosaur nest...

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  • Garrett Prescott
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/pictures/111129-dinosaurs-nest-babies-egg-mongolia-ancient-parents-pictures/    Found in Mongolia...  
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 1, 2011
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    • Tom Johnson
      That is a wonderful find, Garrett. You know, looking at the close up of the skull, I can t get over how much it looks like a mix between a turtle and a bird s
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 1, 2011
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        That is a wonderful find, Garrett. You know, looking at the close up of the skull, I can't get over how much it looks like a mix between a turtle and a bird's beak.
        Tom

        On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 7:29 PM, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:

      • Garrett Prescott
        I agree Tom. They just look so cute; not as cute as baby pandas, but cute. ________________________________      That is a wonderful find, Garrett. You
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 1, 2011
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          I agree Tom. They just look so cute; not as cute as baby pandas, but cute.

            

           
          That is a wonderful find, Garrett. You know, looking at the close up of the skull, I can't get over how much it looks like a mix between a turtle and a bird's beak.
          Tom

          On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 7:29 PM, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:



        • Neal Robbins
          Hi Garrett,       This is a very impressive fossil find. The evidence is clear: Some dinosaurs gave parental care. Maiasaura was another dinosaur that
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 2, 2011
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            Hi Garrett,
             
                This is a very impressive fossil find. The evidence is clear: Some dinosaurs gave parental care. Maiasaura was another dinosaur that looked after its young.
             
                Neal

            From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
            To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 7:29 PM
            Subject: [seymouria] a dinosaur nest...



          • john Lewis
                 Hello:    A perfect crescent moon sent it s shafts of bright light through the trees and into the Castle as I viewed Garrett s post with extreme
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 2, 2011
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                   Hello:
                 A perfect crescent moon sent it's shafts of bright light through the trees and into the "Castle" as I viewed Garrett's post with extreme interest. Wow, that's really a well preserved nest.  It's amazing to thgink that nest is over 75 million years old.  How mind boggling is that???  It's amazing how much we know about Protoceratops based on the fossil record.  This is truly one of the best known Dinos and one of (if not the best) fossil records on the books.  These guys were first discovered (well, that's a debate  for later) in 1922 by photographer J.B. Shackleford while on expedition in Mongolia with none other than Roy Chapman Andrews, the man who discovered the first Dino eggs.  What a small world it is indeed.  During this trip pieces from several individuals were found with some being quite complete.  As the years progressed the hits just kept on coming (if you run out of storage room I'll be glad to take a couple off your hands) to include many eggs as well.
                 By 1923 the animal was named after Andrews (P. andrewsi).  The eggs found were also attributed to this species.  Paleo dudes (and dudettes) also deducted that the amount of well preserved specimens found in close proximity probably meant they were herding animals.  I'd like to say that it's possible, at the very least that they may have been colonial animals (no they didn't come over on the Mayflower), at least during breeding season and that may be another reason they are found together.  Though there are no dinos around today but many amphibians, a few reptiles, and some birds and mammals exhibit the same behaviour.  While on a field expedition to south Florida, my group and I came upon an old carpet that was used by many geckos (either H. turcicus or H. mabouia) ass a communal egg-laying site.  Over thirty eggs were found together and seeing as how these animals only lay two at a time it meant that more than one deposit happened at the same site. 
                 In 1965 a specimen was discovered that, when later closely examined, a footprint of that animal was contained within the specimen.  This was a first to find both the footprints and the individual that made them.
                 Another specimen discovered in 1971 was found interlocked with the skeleton of a Mongolian Velociraptor (V. mongoliensis).  That meant that at least these two species interacted on occasion or  possibly quite frequently.  I say that because a later Velociraptor was found near a Proto, it's head crushed.
                 Good Heavens Commander; what does it all mean (guess where that came from and you get, well, a long distance pat-on-the-back).  It means that in 1993 an egg was examined (probably x-rayed) and it contained...
                 "Ah Creature, Gorblie says it was a baby parrot head dino-thingy."
                 "What are you doing interrupting my dino diatribe (well, discussion anyway) you little green Diarrhea stain.  Now go on out into the east tunnel and feed..."
                 " I know, the Griffon family."
                 "Shut-UP!!!  You're not supposed to bring them up yet.  Now..."
                 "...Gorblie is out."
                   *WHOOSH*
                   *SLAM*
                 "Goblins, can't live with 'em, don't want to kill 'im.  oh well! *sigh*"
                 Where am I .  RRRRR, he frustrates me so.
                 Anyway, the egg contained a baby velociraptor.  Was Velociraptor more caring than formerly assumed?  Were they the great egg thieves that were the bane of protos everywhere? I"m beginning to smell a rat and they didn't come around until shortly after all the dinos called it quits.  Let me ask you this; is it possible Velociraptor was a brood parasite?  Hear me out.  We all know of the Yellow-Billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus), the bird that lays its eggs in other bird's nests so they fosterparent the young.  The movie , The Good Son" comes to mind here.  Well what better place to lay your eggs then in a nest of Protos, who lay lots of eggs, and who vigorously defend their nests (remember the Velociraptor with the crushed skull?  Hey paleo-dudes, check that one out and see if it's a girl).  Well, maybe, rather than being major egg thieves (though they may have done that also), maybe Velociraptors were the cuckoos of their day, which insured the survival of the species.  Food for thought anyway.
                 In 2001 this animal again excited paleontologists with the discovery a second Mongolian species (P. hellinikarhinus).  This species also dates from the Campanium stage of the late Cretaceous (around 75 million years ago).  The new species has a very different skull morphology and actually grows a bit larger (Protoceratops was only about 3 feet tall and six or so feet long).  Quite often these guys are mistaken as being much larger than that.
                 So that brings us up to the present with this phenomenal find of a nest with fifteen babies in it.  They seem to be in a good state of preservation and should supply scientists with lots of new info on Protoceratops.
                  Being commonly found seems to run in the family as the predecessors of Protoceratops, the Psittacosaurs roamed the earth much earlier and probably are early ancestors.  They were small 3-4 feet tall and were bipedal Herbivores.  They are sometimes known as "Parrot Lizards" because of their unique beaked appearance.  Like Protoceratops there have been many specimens found, nearly 400 in all (many nearly copmplete).  This includes a nest complete with 34 individual baby skeletons  They have been broken down into some 17 species and are known as the most species rich of all dinosaurs. 
                 In all Ceratopsians  (and earlier Psittacosaurs) the rostral bone is very pronounced and gives them their distinct look.  Some say the head is very parrot-like while others say it resembles the look of a turtle.
                 Since we've been following this group back one would be remiss not to include Yinlong downsi from the late Jurassic (around 160 million years ago).  Yin Long means "hidden Dragon."  It was found in 2004 near where they filmed "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."  It was a relatively small (around 4' long) basal ceratopsian with a somewhat turtle-like beaked head.
                 I'll tell you what, for a bunch of small dinos, they sure have a rich fossil history.  Even beyond that there are those out there that wonder if early Scythian Nomads (late BC) didn't find a few of these and correlate the skulls as being that of the legendary animal, the Griffin.  Boy, wouldn't that be a kick in the pants.  So, was Andrews group first to find them or not.  Who knows.  They at least got the first publicity anyway.  By the way, Andrews wrote a lot of books on his trips and dinos.  It is possible he was an inspiration for "Indiana Jones.  Too bad he didn't find any Mongolian Deathworms during his travels.  Wouldn't that have been a shocker (pun intended).
                  Have a Phenomenal Day Everyone!!!
                 Spawn (aka, The "Creature")
                


              From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
              To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:29 PM
              Subject: [seymouria] a dinosaur nest...



            • Garrett Prescott
              Oldest tiger species found in China:  http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201112037638/Worlds-oldest-tiger-species-is-discovered-in-China.html      
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 3, 2011
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              • john Lewis
                      Hello:    Very cool.  It s always neat when we can extend back through time the trends of extant species.  Thanx for sharing.    Have a Great
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 3, 2011
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                        Hello:
                     Very cool.  It's always neat when we can extend back through time the trends of extant species.  Thanx for sharing.
                     Have a Great Day!!!
                     Spawn


                  From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                  To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 4:23 PM
                  Subject: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                   
                  Oldest tiger species found in China: 
                  http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201112037638/Worlds-oldest-tiger-species-is-discovered-in-China.html

                   
                         Garrett








                • john Lewis
                  ... From: john Lewis To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 11:38 PM
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 3, 2011
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                    ----- Forwarded Message -----
                    From: john Lewis <creatureproductions@...>
                    To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 11:38 PM
                    Subject: Re: [seymouria] a dinosaur nest...

                         Hello:
                       A perfect crescent moon sent it's shafts of bright light through the trees and into the "Castle" as I viewed Garrett's post with extreme interest. Wow, that's really a well preserved nest.  It's amazing to thgink that nest is over 75 million years old.  How mind boggling is that???  It's amazing how much we know about Protoceratops based on the fossil record.  This is truly one of the best known Dinos and one of (if not the best) fossil records on the books.  These guys were first discovered (well, that's a debate  for later) in 1922 by photographer J.B. Shackleford while on expedition in Mongolia with none other than Roy Chapman Andrews, the man who discovered the first Dino eggs.  What a small world it is indeed.  During this trip pieces from several individuals were found with some being quite complete.  As the years progressed the hits just kept on coming (if you run out of storage room I'll be glad to take a couple off your hands) to include many eggs as well.
                       By 1923 the animal was named after Andrews (P. andrewsi).  The eggs found were also attributed to this species.  Paleo dudes (and dudettes) also deducted that the amount of well preserved specimens found in close proximity probably meant they may have been herd animals.  I'd like to think that it's possible, at the very least, that they may have been colonial animals (no they didn't come over on the Mayflower), at least during breeding season and that may be another reason they are found together.  Though there are no dinos around today many amphibians, a few reptiles, along with some birds and mammals exhibit the same behaviour.  While on a field expedition to south Florida, my group and I came upon an old carpet that was used by many geckos (either H. turcicus or H. mabouia) as a communal egg-laying site.  Over thirty eggs were found together and seeing as how these animals only lay two at a time it meant that more than one deposit happened at the same site. 
                       In 1965 a specimen of Protoceratops was discovered that, when later closely examined, a footprint of that animal was contained within the specimen.  This was a first to find both the footprints and the individual that made them.
                       Another specimen discovered in 1971 was found interlocked with the skeleton of a Mongolian Velociraptor (V. mongoliensis).  That meant that at least these two species interacted on occasion or  possibly quite frequently.  I say that because a later Velociraptor was found near a Proto, it's head crushed.
                       Good Heavens Commander; what does it all mean (guess where that came from and you get, well, a long distance pat-on-the-back).  It means that in 1993 an egg was examined (probably x-rayed) and it contained...
                       "Ah Creature, Gorblie says it was a baby parrot head dino-thingy."
                       "What are you doing interrupting my dino diatribe (well, discussion anyway) you little green Diarrhea stain.  Now go on out into the east tunnel and feed..."
                       " I know, the Griffin family."
                       "Shut-UP!!!  You're not supposed to bring them up yet.  Now..."
                       "...Gorblie is out."
                         *WHOOSH*
                         *SLAM*
                       "Goblins, can't live with 'em, don't want to kill 'im.  oh well! *sigh*"
                       Where am I .  RRRRR, he frustrates me so.
                       Anyway, the egg contained a baby velociraptor.  Was Velociraptor more caring than formerly assumed?  Were they the great egg thieves that were the bane of protos everywhere? I"m beginning to smell a rat and they didn't come around until shortly after all the dinos called it quits.  Let me ask you this; is it possible Velociraptor was a brood parasite?  Hear me out.  We all know of the Yellow-Billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus), the bird that lays its eggs in other bird's nests so they fosterparent the young.  The movie , The Good Son" comes to mind here.  Well what better place to lay your eggs then in a nest of Protos, who lay lots of eggs, and who vigorously defend their nests (remember the Velociraptor with the crushed skull?  Hey paleo-dudes, check that one out and see if it's a girl).  Well, maybe, rather than being major egg thieves (though they may have done that also), maybe Velociraptors were the cuckoos of their day, which insured the survival of the species.  According to some these Dromaeosaurids certainly had the brain capacity to accomplish the task.   Food for thought anyway.
                       In 2001 this animal again excited paleontologists with the discovery a second Mongolian species (P. hellinikarhinus).  This species also dates from the Campanium stage of the late Cretaceous (around 75 million years ago).  The new species has a very different skull morphology and actually grows a bit larger (Protoceratops was only about 3 feet tall and six or so feet long).  Quite often these guys are mistaken as being much larger than that.
                       So that brings us up to the present with this phenomenal find of a nest with fifteen babies in it.  They seem to be in a good state of preservation and should supply scientists with lots of new info on Protoceratops.
                        Being commonly found seems to run in the family as the predecessors of Protoceratops, the Psittacosaurs roamed the earth much earlier and probably are early ancestors.  They were small 3-4 feet tall and were bipedal Herbivores.  They are sometimes known as "Parrot Lizards" because of their unique beaked appearance.  Like Protoceratops there have been many specimens found, nearly 400 in all (many nearly copmplete).  This includes a nest complete with 34 individual baby skeletons  They have been broken down into some 17 species and are known as the most species rich of all dinosaurs. 
                       In all Ceratopsians  (and earlier Psittacosaurs) the rostral bone is very pronounced and gives them their distinct look.  Some say the head is very parrot-like while others say it resembles the look of a turtle.
                       Since we've been following this group back one would be remiss not to include Yinlong downsi from the late Jurassic (around 160 million years ago).  Yin Long means "hidden Dragon."  It was found in 2004 near where they filmed "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."  It was a relatively small (around 4' long) basal ceratopsian with a somewhat turtle-like beaked head.
                       I'll tell you what, for a bunch of small dinos, they sure have a rich fossil history.  Even beyond that there are those out there that wonder if early Scythian Nomads (late BC) didn't find a few of these and correlate the skulls as being that of the legendary animal, the Griffin.  Boy, wouldn't that be a kick in the pants.  So, was Andrews group first to find them or not?  Who knows.  They at least got the first publicity anyway.  By the way, Andrews wrote a lot of books on his trips and dinos.  It is possible he was one of many inspirations used when creating "Indiana Jones?  Too bad he didn't find any Mongolian Deathworms during his travels.  Wouldn't that have been a shocker (pun intended).
                        Have a Phenomenal Day Everyone!!!
                       Spawn (aka, The "Creature")
                      


                    From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                    To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:29 PM
                    Subject: [seymouria] a dinosaur nest...





                  • Neal Robbins
                          This is interesting. It extends the known fossil history of tigers back. The discovery also shows that tigers were smaller in the past than they are
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 4, 2011
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                          This is interesting. It extends the known fossil history of tigers back. The discovery also shows that tigers were smaller in the past than they are now. Thanks for the post, Garrett.
                       
                          Neal

                      From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                      To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 3:23 PM
                      Subject: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                       
                      Oldest tiger species found in China: 
                      http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201112037638/Worlds-oldest-tiger-species-is-discovered-in-China.html

                       
                              Garrett








                    • Neal Robbins
                        Hi John, From: john Lewis To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:38
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 5, 2011
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                        Hi John,
                         
                            You're right; Andrews is quite well known in terms of the discoveries that he made. The giant early Cenozoic mammal Andrewsarchus mongoliensis was named after him. That creature was a mesonychian. The size of the skull indicates that it was a super predator. You stated a good point about those early ceratopsians called Psittacosaurs. As you mentioned, they were bipedal. The transition from bipedal to quadrupedal also occurred in the development of sauropods. The prosauropods, who were ancestral to the sauropods, were bipedal.
                            Andrews carried a rifle, so the fact that he was armed is a parallel between him and Indiana Jones. As we know, Indiana Jones has a pistol in the series of movies in which he is portrayed.
                         
                            Have a marvelous day,
                            Neal

                        From: john Lewis <creatureproductions@...>
                        To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:38 PM
                        Subject: Re: [seymouria] a dinosaur nest...

                         
                             Hello:
                           A perfect crescent moon sent it's shafts of bright light through the trees and into the "Castle" as I viewed Garrett's post with extreme interest. Wow, that's really a well preserved nest.  It's amazing to thgink that nest is over 75 million years old.  How mind boggling is that???  It's amazing how much we know about Protoceratops based on the fossil record.  This is truly one of the best known Dinos and one of (if not the best) fossil records on the books.  These guys were first discovered (well, that's a debate  for later) in 1922 by photographer J.B. Shackleford while on expedition in Mongolia with none other than Roy Chapman Andrews, the man who discovered the first Dino eggs.  What a small world it is indeed.  During this trip pieces from several individuals were found with some being quite complete.  As the years progressed the hits just kept on coming (if you run out of storage room I'll be glad to take a couple off your hands) to include many eggs as well.
                           By 1923 the animal was named after Andrews (P. andrewsi).  The eggs found were also attributed to this species.  Paleo dudes (and dudettes) also deducted that the amount of well preserved specimens found in close proximity probably meant they were herding animals.  I'd like to say that it's possible, at the very least that they may have been colonial animals (no they didn't come over on the Mayflower), at least during breeding season and that may be another reason they are found together.  Though there are no dinos around today but many amphibians, a few reptiles, and some birds and mammals exhibit the same behaviour.  While on a field expedition to south Florida, my group and I came upon an old carpet that was used by many geckos (either H. turcicus or H. mabouia) ass a communal egg-laying site.  Over thirty eggs were found together and seeing as how these animals only lay two at a time it meant that more than one deposit happened at the same site. 
                           In 1965 a specimen was discovered that, when later closely examined, a footprint of that animal was contained within the specimen.  This was a first to find both the footprints and the individual that made them.
                           Another specimen discovered in 1971 was found interlocked with the skeleton of a Mongolian Velociraptor (V. mongoliensis).  That meant that at least these two species interacted on occasion or  possibly quite frequently.  I say that because a later Velociraptor was found near a Proto, it's head crushed.
                           Good Heavens Commander; what does it all mean (guess where that came from and you get, well, a long distance pat-on-the-back).  It means that in 1993 an egg was examined (probably x-rayed) and it contained...
                           "Ah Creature, Gorblie says it was a baby parrot head dino-thingy."
                           "What are you doing interrupting my dino diatribe (well, discussion anyway) you little green Diarrhea stain.  Now go on out into the east tunnel and feed..."
                           " I know, the Griffon family."
                           "Shut-UP!!!  You're not supposed to bring them up yet.  Now..."
                           "...Gorblie is out."
                             *WHOOSH*
                             *SLAM*
                           "Goblins, can't live with 'em, don't want to kill 'im.  oh well! *sigh*"
                           Where am I .  RRRRR, he frustrates me so.
                           Anyway, the egg contained a baby velociraptor.  Was Velociraptor more caring than formerly assumed?  Were they the great egg thieves that were the bane of protos everywhere? I"m beginning to smell a rat and they didn't come around until shortly after all the dinos called it quits.  Let me ask you this; is it possible Velociraptor was a brood parasite?  Hear me out.  We all know of the Yellow-Billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus), the bird that lays its eggs in other bird's nests so they fosterparent the young.  The movie , The Good Son" comes to mind here.  Well what better place to lay your eggs then in a nest of Protos, who lay lots of eggs, and who vigorously defend their nests (remember the Velociraptor with the crushed skull?  Hey paleo-dudes, check that one out and see if it's a girl).  Well, maybe, rather than being major egg thieves (though they may have done that also), maybe Velociraptors were the cuckoos of their day, which insured the survival of the species.  Food for thought anyway.
                           In 2001 this animal again excited paleontologists with the discovery a second Mongolian species (P. hellinikarhinus).  This species also dates from the Campanium stage of the late Cretaceous (around 75 million years ago).  The new species has a very different skull morphology and actually grows a bit larger (Protoceratops was only about 3 feet tall and six or so feet long).  Quite often these guys are mistaken as being much larger than that.
                           So that brings us up to the present with this phenomenal find of a nest with fifteen babies in it.  They seem to be in a good state of preservation and should supply scientists with lots of new info on Protoceratops.
                            Being commonly found seems to run in the family as the predecessors of Protoceratops, the Psittacosaurs roamed the earth much earlier and probably are early ancestors.  They were small 3-4 feet tall and were bipedal Herbivores.  They are sometimes known as "Parrot Lizards" because of their unique beaked appearance.  Like Protoceratops there have been many specimens found, nearly 400 in all (many nearly copmplete).  This includes a nest complete with 34 individual baby skeletons  They have been broken down into some 17 species and are known as the most species rich of all dinosaurs. 
                           In all Ceratopsians  (and earlier Psittacosaurs) the rostral bone is very pronounced and gives them their distinct look.  Some say the head is very parrot-like while others say it resembles the look of a turtle.
                           Since we've been following this group back one would be remiss not to include Yinlong downsi from the late Jurassic (around 160 million years ago).  Yin Long means "hidden Dragon."  It was found in 2004 near where they filmed "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."  It was a relatively small (around 4' long) basal ceratopsian with a somewhat turtle-like beaked head.
                           I'll tell you what, for a bunch of small dinos, they sure have a rich fossil history.  Even beyond that there are those out there that wonder if early Scythian Nomads (late BC) didn't find a few of these and correlate the skulls as being that of the legendary animal, the Griffin.  Boy, wouldn't that be a kick in the pants.  So, was Andrews group first to find them or not.  Who knows.  They at least got the first publicity anyway.  By the way, Andrews wrote a lot of books on his trips and dinos.  It is possible he was an inspiration for "Indiana Jones.  Too bad he didn't find any Mongolian Deathworms during his travels.  Wouldn't that have been a shocker (pun intended).
                            Have a Phenomenal Day Everyone!!!
                           Spawn (aka, The "Creature")
                          
                         
                           
                        From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                        To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 8:29 PM
                        Subject: [seymouria] a dinosaur nest...





                      • Neal Robbins
                        Hi John,       Tigers had a wider distribution in the past than they do now. They were as far west as Turkey. Although tigers were once quite common in
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 5, 2011
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                          Hi John,
                           
                              Tigers had a wider distribution in the past than they do now. They were as far west as Turkey. Although tigers were once quite common in Korea, there are few if any in Korea now. They are not found in the wild in South Korea. While I was working as an English teacher in South Korea back in 1996 and 1997, some Koreans told me that there are a few tigers on a mountain in North Korea. Efforts have been made to preserve the Siberian tiger. They have been successful, but the population of that subspecies is still small.
                              Have a fabulous day,
                              Neal

                          From: john Lewis <creatureproductions@...>
                          To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 11:38 PM
                          Subject: Re: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                           
                                Hello:
                             Very cool.  It's always neat when we can extend back through time the trends of extant species.  Thanx for sharing.
                             Have a Great Day!!!
                             Spawn

                          From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                          To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 4:23 PM
                          Subject: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                           
                          Oldest tiger species found in China: 
                          http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201112037638/Worlds-oldest-tiger-species-is-discovered-in-China.html

                           
                                  Garrett










                        • john Lewis
                               Hello:    Thanx for the additional info Neal.    Have a Great Day!!!    John ________________________________ From: Neal Robbins
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 6, 2011
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                                 Hello:
                               Thanx for the additional info Neal.
                               Have a Great Day!!!
                               John


                            From: Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...>
                            To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 12:21 PM
                            Subject: Re: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                             
                            Hi John,
                             
                                Tigers had a wider distribution in the past than they do now. They were as far west as Turkey. Although tigers were once quite common in Korea, there are few if any in Korea now. They are not found in the wild in South Korea. While I was working as an English teacher in South Korea back in 1996 and 1997, some Koreans told me that there are a few tigers on a mountain in North Korea. Efforts have been made to preserve the Siberian tiger. They have been successful, but the population of that subspecies is still small.
                                Have a fabulous day,
                                Neal

                            From: john Lewis <creatureproductions@...>
                            To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 11:38 PM
                            Subject: Re: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                             
                                  Hello:
                               Very cool.  It's always neat when we can extend back through time the trends of extant species.  Thanx for sharing.
                               Have a Great Day!!!
                               Spawn

                            From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                            To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 4:23 PM
                            Subject: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                             
                            Oldest tiger species found in China: 
                            http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201112037638/Worlds-oldest-tiger-species-is-discovered-in-China.html

                             
                                    Garrett












                          • Neal Robbins
                             You re welcome, John. I enjoy posting to the board.     Have a marvelous day,     Neal From: john Lewis To:
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 7, 2011
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                               You're welcome, John. I enjoy posting to the board.
                               
                                  Have a marvelous day,
                                  Neal


                              From: john Lewis <creatureproductions@...>
                              To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Tuesday, December 6, 2011 9:23 PM
                              Subject: Re: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                               
                                   Hello:
                                 Thanx for the additional info Neal.
                                 Have a Great Day!!!
                                 John

                              From: Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...>
                              To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 12:21 PM
                              Subject: Re: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                               
                              Hi John,
                               
                                  Tigers had a wider distribution in the past than they do now. They were as far west as Turkey. Although tigers were once quite common in Korea, there are few if any in Korea now. They are not found in the wild in South Korea. While I was working as an English teacher in South Korea back in 1996 and 1997, some Koreans told me that there are a few tigers on a mountain in North Korea. Efforts have been made to preserve the Siberian tiger. They have been successful, but the population of that subspecies is still small.
                                  Have a fabulous day,
                                  Neal

                              From: john Lewis <creatureproductions@...>
                              To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 11:38 PM
                              Subject: Re: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                               
                                    Hello:
                                 Very cool.  It's always neat when we can extend back through time the trends of extant species.  Thanx for sharing.
                                 Have a Great Day!!!
                                 Spawn

                              From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                              To: "seymouria@yahoogroups.com" <seymouria@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Saturday, December 3, 2011 4:23 PM
                              Subject: [seymouria] More Asian discoveries...

                               
                              Oldest tiger species found in China: 
                              http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201112037638/Worlds-oldest-tiger-species-is-discovered-in-China.html

                               
                                      Garrett














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