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Eoconularia - A Jellyfish of the Ordovician and Silurian

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  • Neal Robbins
        Eoconularia was a jellyfish of the Ordovician and Silurian. The systematic paleontology of it is: Cnidaria Hatschek 1888 Scyphoza Goette 1887
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 2, 2011
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          Eoconularia was a jellyfish of the Ordovician and Silurian. The systematic paleontology of it is:
       
      Cnidaria Hatschek 1888
      Scyphoza Goette 1887
      Conulariida
      Conulariina Miller and Gurley 1896
      Conulariidae
      Eoconularia Wiman 1895
      Eoconularia loculata Wiman 1895
       
          Eoconularia sp. fossil remains were found in Layer L, Landeyron in Montagne Noire, France. They date to the Arenig interval (479 - 466 million years ago) of the Ordovician. Other remains (also dated to the Arenigh) have been discovered in Layer F in the Schistes de Saint-Chinian Formation of Saint Chinian, France. [Note - The source of this information is The Paleobiology Database.]
          Frederik Jerre wrote an article titled Anatomy and phylogenetic significance of Eoconularia loculata, a conularid from the Silurian of Gotland. It was published in 2007 in Lethaia, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp. 97-109. This quote from the abstract says:
       
      The type material of Eoconularia loculata (Wiman, 1895), a conulariid with high, bifurcated septa, was originally found in an erratic boulder, hence the source-rock is as yet unidentified. Recently, a rich material of the species has been discovered at eleven localities in the Silurian Hemse Beds of Gotland. Another two localities in the Slite Beds (Wenlockian, Sheinwoodian) revealed what is assumed to be the ancestor of E. laculata in having simple, unbranched septa. E. laculata is re-described, and four ontogenetic stages in septal development are recognized. During stage 1, the most juvenile stage, the septa are simple. The septa in stages 3 and 4, the adult stages, are coarse and bifurcated. The affnities of conulariids are discussed, with the conclusion that the group shares a number of similarities with modern scyphorans. The microstructure of the exoskeleton show several similarities with coronatids, and the septa are interpreted to be homologous with the internal structures of stauromedusids. The stratigraphical distribution of all currently known septate conulariids suggest that septa were a primitive morphological feature ranging from early? Ordovician to late Silurian. The simplest type, however, persisted at least into the early Permian. Five of the eleven described septal types have been found only among the conulariids from Gotland.
       
          Juliana de Morales Leme, Marcello Guimaraes Simoes, Antonio Carlos Marques, and Heyo Van Iten wrote an article titled CLADISTIC ANALYSIS OF THE SUBORDER CONULARIINA MILLER AND GURLEY, 1896 (CNIDARIA, SCYPHOZOA; VENDIAN-TRIASSIC). It was published in 2008 in Palaeontology, Volume 51, Issue 3, pp. 649-662. The abstract is on this link.
       
          Neal Robbins
    • Garrett Prescott
      Neal, Tom, Laurie, et al... this is slightly off topic but still interesting and fascinating.  Enjoy!!!
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 2, 2011
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        Neal, Tom, Laurie, et al... this is slightly off topic but still interesting and fascinating.  Enjoy!!!
         
         
        Garrett
      • fadingshadows2000
        Thanks, Garrett! New discoveries in unknown species of life forms are always interesting. I promise not to write a science fiction novel about Martian worms,
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 3, 2011
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          Thanks, Garrett!
          New discoveries in unknown species of life forms are always interesting. I promise not to write a science fiction novel about Martian worms, though (lol).
          Tom

          --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:
          >
          > Neal, Tom, Laurie, et al... this is slightly off topic but still interesting and
          > fascinating.  Enjoy!!!
          >
          > http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/discovery-of-worms-from-hell-deep-beneath-earths-surface-raises-new-questions/2011/05/31/AGnzJTGH_story.html
          >
          >
          > Garrett
          >
        • Laurie
          Wow, that is fascinating! Hard to believe anything could live that far down! And it just goes to show... there are still discoveries to me made, and so much
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 3, 2011
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            Wow, that is fascinating! Hard to believe anything could live that far down! And it just goes to show... there are still discoveries to me made, and so much we still don't know. I was lucky enough to hear the biologist E.O.Wilson lecture back in the fall, and this was one of the things he stressed. He also cautioned on how many species are going extinct, possibly some that haven't even been discovered yet, and how we have no way of knowing what the impact of the extinctions will have on other species. Thanks for the link!

            --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:
            >
            > Neal, Tom, Laurie, et al... this is slightly off topic but still interesting and
            > fascinating.  Enjoy!!!
            >
            > http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/discovery-of-worms-from-hell-deep-beneath-earths-surface-raises-new-questions/2011/05/31/AGnzJTGH_story.html
            >
            >
            > Garrett
            >
          • Garrett Prescott
            Why not??/   A good rousing Martian worm tale; sentient of course. G   Thanks, Garrett! New discoveries in unknown species of life forms are always
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 3, 2011
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              Why not??/   A good rousing Martian worm tale; sentient of course.
               
              G
               

              Thanks, Garrett!
              New discoveries in unknown species of life forms are always interesting. I promise not to write a science fiction novel about Martian worms, though (lol).
              Tom


            • Garrett Prescott
              The title of this article is A Plethora of Fossill Possums .  Just rolls off the tongue, doesn t it?    
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 6, 2011
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                The title of this article is "A Plethora of Fossill Possums".  Just rolls off the tongue, doesn't it?
                 
                 
                Garrett

              • fadingshadows2000
                Nice article, Garrett, thanks! You and Neal find the most interesting fossil data for us! Tom
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 6, 2011
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                  Nice article, Garrett, thanks! You and Neal find the most interesting fossil data for us!
                  Tom

                  --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The title of this article is "A Plethora of Fossill Possums".  Just rolls off
                  > the tongue, doesn't it?
                  >  
                  >   http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/a-plethora-of-fossil-possums/
                  >
                  > Garrett
                  >
                • Laurie
                  Very cool article! Wouldn t you say that s a perplexing posthumous possum puzzle? Ok, that was bad, lol. But anyway, enjoyed the article, thanks for
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 9, 2011
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                    Very cool article! Wouldn't you say that's a perplexing posthumous possum puzzle? Ok, that was bad, lol. But anyway, enjoyed the article, thanks for posting! Really makes you wonder what happened at the time they died.

                    --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The title of this article is "A Plethora of Fossill Possums".  Just rolls off
                    > the tongue, doesn't it?
                    >  
                    >   http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/a-plethora-of-fossil-possums/
                    >
                    > Garrett
                    >
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