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Palorchestes - A Marsupial of the Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene

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  • Neal Robbins
        These links have illustrations of Palorchestes. http://www.bertsgeschiedenissite.nl/geschiedenis%20aarde/palorchestes.jpg
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 1, 2009
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          These links have illustrations of Palorchestes.
      http://www.bertsgeschiedenissite.nl/geschiedenis%20aarde/palorchestes.jpg

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Palorchestes_BW.jpg

          Palorchestes was a genus of marsupials that lived during the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene. The systematic paleontology of Palorchestes is:

      Mammalia Linnaeus 1758
      Marsupiala Illiger 1811
      Diprotodontia Owen 1866
      Palorchestidae Tate 1948
      Palorchestes Owen 1873
      P. anulus
      P. azeal (or azael) Flannery 1983
      P. paine Woodburne 1967
      P. selestiae Mackness 1995
      P. pickeringi
       
          Palorchestes had a length of about 2.5 m. (8.2 feet). Its weight has been estimated at around 500 kg. (1102 pounds). The legs were powerful. Examination of the nasal bones has revealed evidence that Palorchestes had a short proboscis, similar to that of tapirs. The front legs of Palorchestes had large claws. It very likely used them to strip bark from trees. Leaves were probably also a part of the diet of Palorchestes
          Fossil remains of Palorchestes anulus have been found at Encore in Queensland, Australia. They are dated to a late Miocene interval of 11.61 - 5.33 million years ago. [Note - The source of this information is The Paleobiology Database.]
          Fossils of Palorchestes painei were unearthed at Alcoota Station. They date to about 8 million years ago, which was during the late Miocene. 
          Remains of P. azeal were discovered at the Naracoorte Caves. They date to the Pleistocene. Palorchestes azeal is believed to have died out about 40,000 years ago, which was in the late Pleistocene.
          Katarzyna J. Piper wrote an article titled EARLY PLEISTOCENE MAMMALS FROM THE NELSON BAY LOCAL FAUNA, PORTLAND, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. It was published in 2007 in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 27(2): 492-503. The abstract is on this link.
      http://www.vertpaleo.org/publications/jvp/27-492-503.cfm

          Neal Robbins
    • fadingshadows2000
      Thanks, Neal, that s a cute little (!) creature! Hey, Garrett, did you get moved okay? My email is down (again!), so I have to go online to read messages on
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 1, 2009
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        Thanks, Neal, that's a cute little (!) creature! Hey, Garrett, did you get moved okay? My email is down (again!), so I have to go online to read messages on the Groups. Probably won't be receiving any private messages in my Inbox until we can get it straightened out Monday. So if no one hears from me (again), that's the reason! Technology is wonderful - when it works!
        Tom

        --- In seymouria@yahoogroups.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >     These links have illustrations of Palorchestes.
        > http://www.bertsgeschiedenissite.nl/geschiedenis%20aarde/palorchestes.jpg
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Palorchestes_BW.jpg
        >
        >     Palorchestes was a genus of marsupials that lived during the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene. The systematic paleontology of Palorchestes is:
        >
        > Mammalia Linnaeus 1758
        > Marsupiala Illiger 1811
        > Diprotodontia Owen 1866
        > Palorchestidae Tate 1948
        > Palorchestes Owen 1873
        > P. anulus
        > P. azeal (or azael) Flannery 1983
        > P. paine Woodburne 1967
        > P. selestiae Mackness 1995
        > P. pickeringi
        >  
        >     Palorchestes had a length of about 2.5 m. (8.2 feet). Its weight has been estimated at around 500 kg. (1102 pounds). The legs were powerful. Examination of the nasal bones has revealed evidence that Palorchestes had a short proboscis, similar to that of tapirs. The front legs of Palorchestes had large claws. It very likely used them to strip bark from trees. Leaves were probably also a part of the diet of Palorchestes
        >     Fossil remains of Palorchestes anulus have been found at Encore in Queensland, Australia. They are dated to a late Miocene interval of 11.61 - 5.33 million years ago. [Note - The source of this information is The Paleobiology Database.]
        >     Fossils of Palorchestes painei were unearthed at Alcoota Station. They date to about 8 million years ago, which was during the late Miocene. 
        >     Remains of P. azeal were discovered at the Naracoorte Caves. They date to the Pleistocene. Palorchestes azeal is believed to have died out about 40,000 years ago, which was in the late Pleistocene.
        >     Katarzyna J. Piper wrote an article titled EARLY PLEISTOCENE MAMMALS FROM THE NELSON BAY LOCAL FAUNA, PORTLAND, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. It was published in 2007 in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 27(2): 492-503. The abstract is on this link.
        > http://www.vertpaleo.org/publications/jvp/27-492-503.cfm
        >
        >     Neal Robbins
        >
      • Garrett Prescott
        Nope!  Not moved yet Tom. scheduled to pick up U-Haul on the 21st of November. Load and move to Auburn, WA, unload and then settle in. Get re-acquainted with
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 1, 2009
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          Nope!  Not moved yet Tom. scheduled to pick up U-Haul on the 21st of November. Load and move to Auburn, WA, unload and then settle in. Get re-acquainted with all my books.
          Hady little beasts, those palorchestes; made it through three eras.
           
          Garrett
           

          ************************************
           
          .


        • Neal Robbins
              Hi Garrett,     You re right; Palorchestes was around for quite a while. Moving is rather complex. I ve moved quite a number of times. However, I
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 1, 2009
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                Hi Garrett,
             
                You're right; Palorchestes was around for quite a while. Moving is rather complex. I've moved quite a number of times. However, I plan to stay in Arkansas, at least in terms of residence. I might take a few trips overseas, maybe to Thailand.
             
                Neal


            From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
            To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sun, November 1, 2009 11:32:45 AM
            Subject: Re: [seymouria] Re: Palorchestes - A Marsupial of the Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene

             

            Nope!  Not moved yet Tom. scheduled to pick up U-Haul on the 21st of November. Load and move to Auburn, WA, unload and then settle in. Get re-acquainted with all my books.
            Hady little beasts, those palorchestes; made it through three eras.
             
            Garrett
             

            ************ ********* ********* ******
             
            .



          • Neal Robbins
                You re welcome, Tom. I hope your email gets fixed soon. You re right; computers and other modern devices are great when they work.     Neal
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 1, 2009
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                  You're welcome, Tom. I hope your email gets fixed soon. You're right; computers and other modern devices are great when they work.
               
                  Neal


              From: fadingshadows2000 <fadingshadows40@...>
              To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sun, November 1, 2009 9:43:23 AM
              Subject: [seymouria] Re: Palorchestes - A Marsupial of the Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene

               

              Thanks, Neal, that's a cute little (!) creature! Hey, Garrett, did you get moved okay? My email is down (again!), so I have to go online to read messages on the Groups. Probably won't be receiving any private messages in my Inbox until we can get it straightened out Monday. So if no one hears from me (again), that's the reason! Technology is wonderful - when it works!
              Tom

              --- In seymouria@yahoogrou ps.com, Neal Robbins <ctn47496@.. .> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >     These links have illustrations of Palorchestes.
              > http://www.bertsges chiedenissite. nl/geschiedenis% 20aarde/palorche stes.jpg
              >
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Palorchestes_BW.jpg
              >
              >     Palorchestes was a genus of marsupials that lived during the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene. The systematic paleontology of Palorchestes is:
              >
              > Mammalia Linnaeus 1758
              > Marsupiala Illiger 1811
              > Diprotodontia Owen 1866
              > Palorchestidae Tate 1948
              > Palorchestes Owen 1873
              > P. anulus
              > P. azeal (or azael) Flannery 1983
              > P. paine Woodburne 1967
              > P. selestiae Mackness 1995
              > P. pickeringi
              >  
              >     Palorchestes had a length of about 2.5 m. (8.2 feet). Its weight has been estimated at around 500 kg. (1102 pounds). The legs were powerful. Examination of the nasal bones has revealed evidence that Palorchestes had a short proboscis, similar to that of tapirs. The front legs of Palorchestes had large claws. It very likely used them to strip bark from trees. Leaves were probably also a part of the diet of Palorchestes
              >     Fossil remains of Palorchestes anulus have been found at Encore in Queensland, Australia. They are dated to a late Miocene interval of 11.61 - 5.33 million years ago. [Note - The source of this information is The Paleobiology Database.]
              >     Fossils of Palorchestes painei were unearthed at Alcoota Station. They date to about 8 million years ago, which was during the late Miocene. 
              >     Remains of P. azeal were discovered at the Naracoorte Caves. They date to the Pleistocene. Palorchestes azeal is believed to have died out about 40,000 years ago, which was in the late Pleistocene.
              >     Katarzyna J. Piper wrote an article titled EARLY PLEISTOCENE MAMMALS FROM THE NELSON BAY LOCAL FAUNA, PORTLAND, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. It was published in 2007 in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 27(2): 492-503. The abstract is on this link.
              > http://www.vertpaleo.org/publications/jvp/27-492-503.cfm
              >
              >     Neal Robbins
              >


            • fadingshadows2000
              Hi Neal, Are you planning on teaching in Thailand, or just going for a visit? There are lots of interesting animals in Asia, as well as the country itself. If
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 2, 2009
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                Hi Neal,
                Are you planning on teaching in Thailand, or just going for a visit? There are lots of interesting animals in Asia, as well as the country itself. If you know anyone going to Hong Kong, let me know. I'm looking for a book (hahaha).
                Tom


                >     Hi Garrett,
                >
                >     You're right; Palorchestes was around for quite a while. Moving is rather complex. I've moved quite a number of times. However, I plan to stay in Arkansas, at least in terms of residence. I might take a few trips overseas, maybe to Thailand.
                >
                >     Neal
              • Garrett Prescott
                In my lifetime Neal, I have moved so many times I cannotcount them most of the first 11 moves were in the same town. First move was within the same county. I
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 2, 2009
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                  In my lifetime Neal, I have moved so many times I cannotcount them most of the first 11 moves were in the same town. First move was within the same county. I feel certain that this may be the last move before I kick off. 

                   

                  Trips are different. I have enjoyed, at least, 90% of those.

                   

                  Now... her is a link to a new fossil discovery:  http://www.physorg.com/news176119692.html    Can you explain to me where the name tatankacephelus was derived. I find it of interest.

                   

                  Garrett



                   
                  .


                • Neal Robbins
                  Hi Tom,     Most likely it will be for a visit, though I ve considered the idea of teaching there. You re right; Asia has a lot of interesting wildlife.
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 2, 2009
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                    Hi Tom,
                     
                        Most likely it will be for a visit, though I've considered the idea of teaching there. You're right; Asia has a lot of interesting wildlife. They also have some very good items of archaeological and paleontological interest, i.e. museums and sites to visit. I'll let you know if I hear of anyonte going to Hong Kong.
                     
                        Neal


                    From: fadingshadows2000 <fadingshadows40@...>
                    To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Mon, November 2, 2009 8:11:47 AM
                    Subject: [seymouria] Re: Palorchestes - A Marsupial of the Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene

                     

                    Hi Neal,
                    Are you planning on teaching in Thailand, or just going for a visit? There are lots of interesting animals in Asia, as well as the country itself. If you know anyone going to Hong Kong, let me know. I'm looking for a book (hahaha).
                    Tom

                    >     Hi Garrett,
                    >
                    >     You're right; Palorchestes was around for quite a while. Moving is rather complex. I've moved quite a number of times. However, I plan to stay in Arkansas, at least in terms of residence. I might take a few trips overseas, maybe to Thailand.
                    >
                    >     Neal


                  • Neal Robbins
                    Trips are more enjoyable than moves. There s not as much that one has to take along on a trip as on a move.     Neal ________________________________ From:
                    Message 9 of 9 , Nov 2, 2009
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                      Trips are more enjoyable than moves. There's not as much that one has to take along on a trip as on a move.
                       
                          Neal


                      From: Garrett Prescott <peconpie2@...>
                      To: seymouria@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Mon, November 2, 2009 10:08:42 AM
                      Subject: Re: [seymouria] Re: Palorchestes - A Marsupial of the Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene

                       

                      In my lifetime Neal, I have moved so many times I cannotcount them most of the first 11 moves were in the same town. First move was within the same county. I feel certain that this may be the last move before I kick off. 

                       

                      Trips are different. I have enjoyed, at least, 90% of those.

                       

                      Now... her is a link to a new fossil discovery:  http://www.physorg. com/news17611969 2.html    Can you explain to me where the name tatankacephelus was derived. I find it of interest.

                       

                      Garrett



                       
                      .



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