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A third of men 'bored with marriage'

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    A third of men bored with marriage Tuesday January 09, 2007  One in four divorcees surveyed admitted that they had doubts about the solidity of the coming
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 8, 2007

      A third of men 'bored with marriage'

      Tuesday January 09, 2007



      One in four divorcees surveyed admitted that they had doubts about the solidity of the coming union as they walked down the aisle.

      LONDON - Nearly a fifth of couples in Britain are on the brink of splitting up and one in 10 say they no longer have sex, a survey says.

      The survey, conducted to publicise the launch of insidedivorce.com, found sex, infidelity, abuse and falling out of love are the primary reasons for divorce.

      Of the 2000 married, divorced and separated people surveyed, a third of the men said they were bored with their wife and marriage.

      A fifth of women said their marriage had broken down because of a serious incident of abuse.

      About 16 per cent said their marriage was "on shaky ground" while 2.5 per cent said it was "on the rocks".

      Nearly half said their sex lives had decreased, with men citing "lack of sex" as the biggest factor in marriage breakdown.

      Official figures show divorce rates are at their lowest level since 2000 with 155,000 divorces granted in 2005.

      The website's editor, Fay Rowe, said the survey's findings suggested the rate would not be falling dramatically in future.

      "It is worrying that sex, not having it or having it with someone other than your partner, is the main catalyst for divorce. It suggests we are no longer satisfied with having one partner in life."

      The survey found some evidence of the "seven-year itch", with the average length of time for people to realise whether their marriage worked or not at seven years and three months.

      By contrast, marriages lasting longer than 10 1/2 years would probably survive.

      One in four divorcees admitted they had doubts about the solidity of the coming union as they walked down the aisle.

      The researchers also interviewed 341 children to see how divorce affected them and found 80 per cent thought their home life was the same or better after divorce.

      The researchers also found only a quarter wanted their parents to get back together.

      The children said the biggest benefit of divorce was an end to arguments. But they also said the worst drawback was parents bickering over the time they got to spend with them.

      - REUTERS


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