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Big hips 'impair' women's memory, a study finds

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  • Chris & Christine
    14 July 2010 Last updated at 11:02 ET Big hips impair women s memory, a study finds  Being pear-shaped may hamper brain function, the researchers believe
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 16, 2010

      14 July 2010 Last updated at 11:02 ET

      Big hips 'impair' women's memory, a study finds

       Being pear-shaped may hamper brain function, the researchers believe
      A woman's body shape may influence how good her memory is, according to US researchers.
      Although carrying excess weight anywhere appears to impair older women's brains, carrying it on the hips may make matters worse, they say.
      The Northwestern Medicine team found "apple-shaped" women fared better than "pears" on cognitive tests.
      But depositing fat around the waist increases the risk of cancer, diabetes and heart disease, experts warn.
      They said the findings, in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, highlighted the importance of maintaining a healthy weight for both body and mind.
      “Start Quote
      With so much evidence of the dangers of obesity, we could all do well to consider sensible lifestyle changes to keep our weight in check”
      End Quote Rebecca Wood Chief executive of The Alzheimer's Research Trust
      Some of the health risks associated with obesity, such as vascular disease and inflammation, may explain why people who are overweight appear to be at higher risk of dementia.
      However, the latest study suggests a bit of extra fat around the waist may actually protect brain functioning.
      Spare tyre
      The researchers believe belly fat makes more of the female hormone oestrogen that naturally dips after the menopause.
      Oestrogen is thought to help protect the brain from cognitive decline.
      The study involved 8,745 post-menopausal women aged 65 to 79.
      These women were asked to complete a memory test that doctors use to judge brain function. They were also weighed and measured, then scored on an obesity scale known as Body Mass Index or BMI. Over two-thirds of the women were overweight or obese.
      The researchers found that for every one point increase in a woman's BMI, her memory score dropped by one point.
      And pear-shaped women - those with smaller waists but bigger hips - scored particularly poorly.
      The researchers say this is likely to be related to the type of fat deposited around the hips versus the waist.
      Scientists already know different kinds of fat release different hormones and have varying effects on insulin resistance, lipids and blood pressure.
      Lead researcher Dr Diana Kerwin said: "We need to find out if one kind of fat is more detrimental than the other, and how it affects brain function.
      "The fat may contribute to the formation of plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease or a restricted blood flow to the brain."
      Rebecca Wood, chief executive of the Alzheimer's Research Trust, said: "The pear-shape is incredibly common, and while this study doesn't explain fully the link between body shape and brain function, it surely makes the case for watching the scales.
      "There is little we can do about our natural body shape, but a lot we can do about our weight.
      "With so much evidence of the dangers of obesity, we could all do well to consider sensible lifestyle changes to keep our weight in check."


      Thursday, 29 October 2009


      'Pear and apple' shape a DVT risk


      Carrying excess weight around the hips increases clot risk for women
      Women who carry excess weight on the hips and thighs, and apple-shaped men who carry it on the waist, risk dangerous blood clots, say experts.
      Being overweight per se is risky, but where the fat accumulates is also critical, say the Danish scientists.
      They tracked more than 50,000 men and women to see how many suffered a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or a clot in the lung called pulmonary embolism (PE).
      The findings are published in the journal Circulation.
      During the 10-year study, there were 641 cases of DVT or PE among the men and women.



       The implications to the public are that all types of obesity increase the risk for venous thromboembolism, but the location of body fat also plays some unknown role



      Lead researcher Dr Marianne Tang Severinsen
      After stripping out known risk factors such as smoking, diabetes and cholesterol, a pattern between body shape and clot risk emerged, independent of body weight alone.
      Pear-shaped women with big hips and thighs were at higher risk of dangerous clots, even if they had an "ideal" body weight.
      For men, an expanded waistline was riskier.
      Lead researcher Dr Marianne Tang Severinsen, of Aarhus University Hospital in Aalborg, said: "Until now, the importance of fat distribution and venous thromboembolism risk has not been evaluated.
      "The implications to the public are that all types of obesity increase the risk for venous thromboembolism, but the location of body fat also plays some unknown role.
      "For health professionals, the implication is that all types of fat distribution should be taken into account when evaluating risk of venous thromboembolism."
      It is unclear exactly how the fat increases the clot risk, but experts believe it could be partly physical - compression on the veins - and partly chemical - fat cells make hormones that encourage clotting.
      Judy O'Sullivan, cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation, said: "Excess body fat poses several threats to your health, particularly when it is stored around your waist, so it is best to try and avoid it by exercising regularly and eating a balanced diet low in saturated fat."

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