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Wife's menopause trigger for men's mid life crisis, researchers say

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    Wife s menopause trigger for men s mid life crisis, researchers say by Evellne Jenkin A man s midlffe crisis has more to do with his wife s age than his own,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 19, 2007
      Wife's menopause trigger for men's mid life crisis, researchers say

      by Evellne Jenkin

      A man's midlffe crisis has more to do with his wife's age than his own, researchers have found.

      Researchers have discovered that the trigger for the proverbial male midlffe crisis may not be a man's age at all, but a reaction to his wife's imminent menopause.

      Writing in the journal Psychology ~bday, doctors Alan S. Miller and Satoshi Kanazawa say a man's midlife crisis is often jolted into being when his wife nears the end of her reproductive life and his evolutionary need to attract younger women is renewed.

      Therefore a 50-year-old man married to a 25-year-old woman would not experience a midlife crisis, but if the situation was reversed, he would—in the same way that a 5~year-old man married to a 5~year-old woman would.

      "When he buys a shiny-red sports car, he's not trying to regain his youth; he's trying to attract young women to replace his menopausal wife by trumpeting his flash and cash," the researchers write.

      The midlife crisis findings are just one of 10 "outrageous truths about men and women" published in the report.

      Other assertions are that beautiful people have more daughters and that having sons reduces the likelihood of divorce.


      "A 50-year-old man married to a 25-year old woman would not have a midlife crisis, but if the situation was reversed he would." Alan S. Mliler and Satoshl Kanazawa

      Although physical attractiveness is a universally positive trait,
      it contributes more to women's reproductive success than men's, so it follows that attractive couples wil1 have more female children.

      There is evidence to back this hypothesis, with 4mericans who are rarted "very attractive" having a 56 per cent chance of conceiving a daughter as their frst child, compared with a 48 per cent chance for everyone else.

      Attractiveness may be a positive trait for women, but men are more likely to be judged on their wealth, status and power. SocioL ogists and demographers say this mindset may be behind a more unusual f~nding—that couples with sons are less likely to divorce.

      Miller and Kanazawa say the coritinued presence of a father in his son's life is important to ensure the transfer of wealth and status to the next generation.

      However, there is not much a father can do to perpetuate the things important for women; namely making his daughter more youthful or physically attractive.

      "The presence of sons thus deters divorce and departure of the father from the family more than the presence of daughters," the report states.

      The findings will be published later this year in the book "Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters.

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