Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Digest Number 637

Expand Messages
  • Robin
    I think it is important to mention that JWSDP and some other technologies available from the Sun website are not appropriate at all for anything else than
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 21, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      I think it is important to mention that JWSDP and some other
      technologies available from the Sun website are not appropriate at
      all for anything else than evaluation purposes. I don't say that
      these tools are not robust enough but there is no licence for.
      Check the licence before using JWSDP for a real application:

      http://java.sun.com/webservices/docs/1.6/LICENSE
      ------------------
      I. LICENSE TO EVALUATE. Sun grants to you, a non-exclusive, non-
      transferable, royalty-free and limited license to use one (1) copy of
      the Software internally for the purposes of evaluation only for one
      hundred eighty (180) days after the date you download the Software
      from Sun ("Evaluation Period"). No license is granted to you for any
      other purpose. You may not sell, rent, loan or otherwise encumber or
      transfer the Software in whole or in part, to any third party.
      Licensee shall have no right to use the Software for productive or
      commercial use.
      -------------------

      I agree with Anne, the best thing to do is to use Apache Axis or the
      web service toolkit provided by your favorite J2EE vendor for
      building real-world web service applications.

      Robin

      --- In service-orientated-architecture@yahoogroups.com, Anne Thomas
      Manes <atmanes@g...> wrote:
      >
      > Although the JWSDP is certainly an adequate platform for building
      web
      > services
      > ...
      > it's probably more appopriate to use the built-in web services
      tools than to
      > use the JWSDP. JWSDP requires the latest release of Tomcat, and
      therefore is
      > incompatible with most J2EE products.
      >
      > Anne
    • Farrukh Najmi
      Robin wrote: I think it is important to mention that JWSDP and some other technologies available from the Sun website are not appropriate at all for anything
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 21, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Robin wrote:
        I think it is important to mention that JWSDP and some other
        technologies available from the Sun website are not appropriate at
        all for anything else than evaluation purposes. I don't say that
        these tools are not robust enough but there is no licence for.
        Check the licence before using JWSDP for a real application:

        http://java.sun.com/webservices/docs/1.6/LICENSE
        As I said in my original email on this thread, the JWSDP, as its name indicates, is a free developer focused download. It is meant for developers to evaluate the technologies during development phase. The original poster wanted to learn how to develop web service for SOA environments (i.e. it was a developer focused inquiry).

        The core web services technologies such as JAXB, SAAJ, JAX-RPC and JAXR all are implementations of standard Java APIs which means that they
        are API compatible with any other implementation that conforms to the same Java API standards. This means that developers can develop using JWSDP 1.6
        without any fear of vendor locking and at deployment time use a different implementation of these APIs.

        For production deployment Sun offers *for fee* products such as Sun's Java Enterprise System 4:

            http://www.sun.com/software/javaenterprisesystem/index.xml

        that may be used for deployment of the same technologies. Alternatively at deployment time a project may use
        other implementation than Sun's for these standard Java APIs.

        ------------------
        I. LICENSE TO EVALUATE. Sun grants to you, a non-exclusive, non-
        transferable, royalty-free and limited license to use one (1) copy of
        the Software internally for the purposes of evaluation only for one
        hundred eighty (180) days after the date you download the Software
        from Sun ("Evaluation Period"). No license is granted to you for any
        other purpose. You may not sell, rent, loan or otherwise encumber or
        transfer the Software in whole or in part, to any third party.
        Licensee shall have no right to use the Software for productive or
        commercial use.
        -------------------

        I agree with Anne, the best thing to do is to use Apache Axis or the
        web service toolkit provided by your favorite J2EE vendor for
        building real-world web service applications.

        Robin

        --- In service-orientated-architecture@yahoogroups.com, Anne Thomas
        Manes <atmanes@g...> wrote:
        >
        > Although the JWSDP is certainly an adequate platform for building
        web
        > services
        > ...
        > it's probably more appopriate to use the built-in web services
        tools than to
        > use the JWSDP. JWSDP requires the latest release of Tomcat, and
        therefore is
        > incompatible with most J2EE products.
        >
        > Anne







        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





        -- 
        Regards,
        Farrukh
        
        
      • Uday Subbarayan
        Just to add to Farrukh s comment: I am not sure why JWSDP requires latest release of Tomcat is a concern here ... IMO, this is a very good thing for a
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 22, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Just to add to Farrukh's comment:
          I am not sure why "JWSDP requires latest release of Tomcat" is a
          concern here ...

          IMO, this is a very good thing for a developer who wants to learn
          about the latest webservice development. The latest release of
          Tomcat 5.x has many new features compared to the Tomcat4.x and
          Apache people have done a great job and there is nothing wrong in
          using Tomcat5.x.

          The Apache Axis is also a good framework and basically it's also a
          web app(meaning .war file) and runs ontop of Tomcat.

          So in both case, it needs Tomcat.

          Again,IMO for learning webservices, full blown AS may be heavy
          weight and lightweight frameworks like JWSDP or Axis is a great
          start.

          Just FYI:I haven't tried the latest Axis yet but from the doc, it
          still runs on Tomcat4.x,
          http://ws.apache.org/axis/java/install.html#Step2SettingUpTheLibrarie
          s

          -Uday.
        • Anne Thomas Manes
          I apologize for giving inaccurate information. I clearly recall users on the jax-rpc discussion list citing difficulties when trying to deploy JWSDP on any
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 25, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            I apologize for giving inaccurate information. I clearly recall users on the jax-rpc discussion list citing difficulties when trying to deploy JWSDP on any platform other than the version of Tomcat that was distributed with JWSDP. But now that I think about it, that was JWSDP v1.4, and I believe it required a servlet feature that is now part of J2EE 1.4. At that point in time, only the latest version of Tomcat supported that feature. I'm pretty sure that JWSDP requires J2EE 1.4.

            It's not that I have anything against Tomcat, but if you plan to deploy on WebSphere 5.1 or WebLogic 8 or some other pre-existing J2EE engine, then you don't have the luxury of deploying on the latest release of Tomcat.

            If your goal is simply to learn, then JWSDP and Axis running on Tomcat are both excellent solutions. If your goal is to deploy a production application on a commercial J2EE application server, then you need to make sure that the SOAP stack runs on your target platform. You also need to make sure that you have an appropriate license to use the software for a commercial purpose.

            Anne

            On 10/22/05, Uday Subbarayan <kumarudaya@...> wrote:
            Just to add to Farrukh's comment:
            I am not sure why "JWSDP requires latest release of Tomcat" is a
            concern here ...

            IMO, this is a very good thing for a developer who wants to learn
            about the latest webservice development. The latest release of
            Tomcat 5.x has many new features compared to the Tomcat4.x and
            Apache people have done a great job and there is nothing wrong in
            using Tomcat5.x.

            The Apache Axis is also a good framework and basically it's also a
            web app(meaning .war file) and runs ontop of Tomcat.

            So in both case, it needs Tomcat.

            Again,IMO for learning webservices, full blown AS may be heavy
            weight and lightweight frameworks like JWSDP or Axis is a great
            start.

            Just FYI:I haven't tried the latest Axis yet but from the doc, it
            still runs on Tomcat4.x,
            http://ws.apache.org/axis/java/install.html#Step2SettingUpTheLibrarie
            s

            -Uday.







            ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
            Fair play? Video games influencing politics. Click and talk back!
            http://us.click.yahoo.com/T8sf5C/tzNLAA/TtwFAA/NhFolB/TM
            --------------------------------------------------------------------~->


            Yahoo! Groups Links

            <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/service-orientated-architecture/

            <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                 service-orientated-architecture-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                 http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




          • Farrukh Najmi
            (Changing subject to something more topical) There has been some doubt expressed by forum colleague below regarding the JWSDP 1.6 license. This email is to
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 26, 2005
            • 0 Attachment

              (Changing subject to something more topical)

              There has been some doubt expressed by forum colleague below regarding the JWSDP 1.6 license.
              This email is to clear the doubt.

              Farrukh Najmi wrote:
              Robin wrote:
              I think it is important to mention that JWSDP and some other
              technologies available from the Sun website are not appropriate at
              all for anything else than evaluation purposes. I don't say that
              these tools are not robust enough but there is no licence for.
              Check the licence before using JWSDP for a real application:

              http://java.sun.com/webservices/docs/1.6/LICENSE
              Looking at the above license in the context of the ReleaseNotes for JWSDP 1.6, one will see that it is actually quite permissive of redistributing *most* components of JWSDP 1.6, at deployment time, on a royalty free basis.

              The restrictions on deployment options applies only when redistributing *entire* JWSDP 1.6.
              Redistributing individual "redistributable" component(s) is allowed on a royalty free basis.

              Note that *most* components of JWSDP 1.6 fall into "redistributable" category:

              http://java.sun.com/webservices/docs/1.6/ReleaseNotes.html#RedistributableComponents

              In summary,  the JWSDP 1.6 license quoted above only applies to redistributing *all of* JWSDP 1.6 (including "non-redistributable" components).
              Any one or more of the "redistributable" components is allowed to be redistrubuted or used at deployment time, on a royalty free basis.
              The ReleaseNotes linbk above describes which components are redistributable and which are not (most are).

              The typical reason why some components are "non-redistributable" in the ReleaseNotes.html is because they are based on evolving APIs that are not yet final.

              HTH
              As I said in my original email on this thread, the JWSDP, as its name indicates, is a free developer focused download. It is meant for developers to evaluate the technologies during development phase. The original poster wanted to learn how to develop web service for SOA environments (i.e. it was a developer focused inquiry).

              The core web services technologies such as JAXB, SAAJ, JAX-RPC and JAXR all are implementations of standard Java APIs which means that they
              are API compatible with any other implementation that conforms to the same Java API standards. This means that developers can develop using JWSDP 1.6
              without any fear of vendor locking and at deployment time use a different implementation of these APIs.

              For production deployment Sun offers *for fee* products such as Sun's Java Enterprise System 4:

                  http://www.sun.com/software/javaenterprisesystem/index.xml

              that may be used for deployment of the same technologies. Alternatively at deployment time a project may use
              other implementation than Sun's for these standard Java APIs.

              ------------------
              I. LICENSE TO EVALUATE. Sun grants to you, a non-exclusive, non-
              transferable, royalty-free and limited license to use one (1) copy of
              the Software internally for the purposes of evaluation only for one
              hundred eighty (180) days after the date you download the Software
              from Sun ("Evaluation Period"). No license is granted to you for any
              other purpose. You may not sell, rent, loan or otherwise encumber or
              transfer the Software in whole or in part, to any third party.
              Licensee shall have no right to use the Software for productive or
              commercial use.
              -------------------

              I agree with Anne, the best thing to do is to use Apache Axis or the
              web service toolkit provided by your favorite J2EE vendor for
              building real-world web service applications.

              Robin

              --- In service-orientated-architecture@yahoogroups.com, Anne Thomas
              Manes <atmanes@g...> wrote:
              >
              > Although the JWSDP is certainly an adequate platform for building
              web
              > services
              > ...
              > it's probably more appopriate to use the built-in web services
              tools than to
              > use the JWSDP. JWSDP requires the latest release of Tomcat, and
              therefore is
              > incompatible with most J2EE products.
              >
              > Anne







              YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





              -- 
              Regards,
              Farrukh
              
                


              SPONSORED LINKS
              Service-oriented architecture Computer monitoring software Free computer monitoring software

              YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS





              -- 
              Regards,
              Farrukh
              
              
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.