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Re: [service-orientated-architecture] Web Services' Tipping Point

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  • Bill Appleton
    I think of this as the web services apocalypse. This is when the viral effect of integration turns service-based architectures from a technology study into a
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 2 6:12 AM
      I think of this as the "web services apocalypse." This is when the viral effect of integration turns service-based architectures from a technology study into a "must-have" requirement of doing business. In my talks with IBM and Msft years ago this was mentioned as a reason that they adopted web services. This effect will sell the next generation of software products...
       
       
      Bill
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, August 02, 2004 11:54 AM
      Subject: [service-orientated-architecture] Web Services' Tipping Point

      <<End-users, vendors, and press alike often ask the question, "So,
      when are we finally going to see widespread adoption of Web Services
      and SOAs?" The answer to this question is that Web Services are a
      great example of a distributed technology, and distributed
      technologies exhibit the network effect. The network effect states
      that the adoption rate of the network increases in proportion to its
      utility. In other words, as more resources are connected to the
      network, there is greater desire to connect additional systems to
      consume those resources, providing an increased motivation to add
      additional resources to the network.

      <In the beginning, the growth of any network is small, because only
      visionary parts of the organization are willing to utilize such new
      technology. But at some point, the growth of the network reaches a
      tipping point where the deployment and use of the technology explodes,
      to be abated only by the saturation of the technology on the network.
      Prior to the tipping point, any networked technology struggles to
      establish its value proposition, but after that tipping point, it
      becomes ubiquitous, and consumers of the technology rise in importance
      as purveyors of the technology compete for their business. Today,
      there are clear signs that Web Services are nearing their tipping
      point, and when that point passes, the world of distributed computing
      will never be the same.>>

      You can find this ZapThink article at:

      http://searchwebservices.techtarget.com/originalContent/0,289142,sid26_gci994975,00.html

      Gervas




    • Gervas Douglas
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 2 8:54 AM
        <<End-users, vendors, and press alike often ask the question, "So,
        when are we finally going to see widespread adoption of Web Services
        and SOAs?" The answer to this question is that Web Services are a
        great example of a distributed technology, and distributed
        technologies exhibit the network effect. The network effect states
        that the adoption rate of the network increases in proportion to its
        utility. In other words, as more resources are connected to the
        network, there is greater desire to connect additional systems to
        consume those resources, providing an increased motivation to add
        additional resources to the network.

        <In the beginning, the growth of any network is small, because only
        visionary parts of the organization are willing to utilize such new
        technology. But at some point, the growth of the network reaches a
        tipping point where the deployment and use of the technology explodes,
        to be abated only by the saturation of the technology on the network.
        Prior to the tipping point, any networked technology struggles to
        establish its value proposition, but after that tipping point, it
        becomes ubiquitous, and consumers of the technology rise in importance
        as purveyors of the technology compete for their business. Today,
        there are clear signs that Web Services are nearing their tipping
        point, and when that point passes, the world of distributed computing
        will never be the same.>>

        You can find this ZapThink article at:

        http://searchwebservices.techtarget.com/originalContent/0,289142,sid26_gci994975,00.html

        Gervas
      • Mark Baker
        ... No. You don t just get network effects because your system is distributed, you get them because your system is architected to have them. Web services
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2 3:57 PM
          > The answer to this question is that Web Services are a
          > great example of a distributed technology, and distributed
          > technologies exhibit the network effect.

          No. You don't just get network effects because your system is
          distributed, you get them because your system is architected to have
          them. Web services have *extremely* weak network effects; so weak in
          fact, that I've long said that there will be no tipping point for them;

          http://www.markbaker.ca/2002/09/Blog/2003/12/31#2003-12-ws-network-effects

          Mark.
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