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Re: [service-orientated-architecture] Re: Legacy into SOA (was Vandersluis on a Data Abstraction Layer's Benefits)

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  • Patrick May
    ... If the functionality provided by the applications is wrapped in one or more services, the two become synonymous. In many cases, this is the best practice.
    Message 1 of 43 , Jun 30, 2008
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      Michael Poulin wrote:
      If you mean Web Service when talking about service, I understand what you said.

      I definitely didn't mean to limit my statement to Web Services.  The plethora of Web Service standards is just one, not particularly elegant, way of implementing services.  I was speaking in terms of the general concept of a service, not one implementation technology.

      Nevertheless, I stay with my statement. I tried to explane this in one of my latest posts.

      Personally, I am in favor of aggregated services rather than composite applications.

      Is the difference between those two deeper than mere semantics?

      Judge by yourself:
      aggregated services comprise self-contained services ( at the bottom of the service pyramid) while composite applications may contain non-service which we might not know how to deal with. I dislike this potential ambiguity.

      If the functionality provided by the applications is wrapped in one or more services, the two become synonymous.  In many cases, this is the best practice.

      Regards,

      Patrick

      ----
      S P Engineering, Inc.
      Large scale, mission-critical, distributed OO systems design and implementation.
      (C++, Java, Common Lisp, Jini, middleware, SOA)



    • Michael Poulin
      How do you know what to want? You have a repository of services with its descriptions - functionality, RWE and, BTW, interfaces (possibly, more than one per
      Message 43 of 43 , Jul 6, 2008
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        How do you know what to want?

        You have a repository of services with its descriptions - functionality, RWE and, BTW, interfaces (possibly, more than one per service). You need a service which fulfill your task. Services are announced by somebody you do not know. Even if you read the descriptions, how do you know that the publisher meant the same thing unfer particular word as you do? Even if you use a word-matching searchers like Lucene or Google's indexing, maximum you can get is a match of the word (pray if it is in English and not in other languages that modify the words depending on the context...), not its meaning.

        Jini is nice for programmers, when the consumer and provider are in the same culture and language dialect. This is oversimplified world, unfortunately (with all respect to Jini).

        - Michael

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Gregg Wonderly <gergg@...>
        To: service-orientated-architecture@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, July 6, 2008 2:21:48 AM
        Subject: Re: [service-orientated-architecture] Re: Legacy into SOA (was Vandersluis on a Data Abstraction Layer's Benefits)

        Michael Poulin wrote:

        >
        >
        > Modern UDDI and old CORBA Object Trading Service both have the same
        > problem - how to express a look-up query to find the service you need?
        > Google's and others' word-matching techniques does not work well enough
        > in the business, its efficiency is about 80% (as you mentioned) and we
        > need a much better result w/o "having a meeting and just agreeing on the
        > share vocab". Actually, in SO, we are interested in functions rather
        > than in vendors (who we could have a meeting with)
        >
        > Serendipity: Looking for something, we usually find something else but
        > it is exactly what we need. This is my translation from Russian version
        > of Winnie-The-Pooh. This is what I think we need in SO service discovery.

        This is why Jini service matching, using interface types is so "perfect". You
        search for "exactly" what you want, and you get it. No muss, no fuss...

        Gregg Wonderly


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