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RE: [serapier] Re: Invitational Tourney and Tournament of Foxes - a challenge

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  • Gardner, Steve
    Well said..!! - Stefan While I obviously can t accept an invitation, I do very much want to play in this challenge. I propose that Edumund Dantes, the Count of
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 1, 2011

      Well said..!! - Stefan

       

      While I obviously can't accept an invitation, I do very much want to play in this challenge. I propose that Edumund Dantes, the Count of Monte Cristo, from the works of Alexandre Dumas is the model captain.

      "Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes. You must look into that storm and shout as you did in Rome . Do your worst, for I will do mine!"

      These are not simply the calculated words of a man bent on vengeance. Dantes has lived the philosophy he recommends to his son. The son of a clerk and an educated man, Dantes is betrayed by a friend just when everything in his life seems perfect. He loses his love, his future, and his liberty to be imprisoned in the Chateau d'If under the sadistic lash of a jailer who knows, who admits, that he is innocent.

      There Dantes meets a priest who further educates him in science, philosophy, and swordplay while helping him to escape and revealing his friend's betrayal. Dantes then learns of a treasure which will allow him to execute his plan for vengeance on the three men responsible for his loss.

      Dantes is courageous, learned, resourceful, and just. His plans
      expose the wicked to justice through their own vices. Edmund earns the respect and aid of those he meets in adversity and their loyalty facilitates the execution of his machinations. The loyalty that he inspires is most significant in making him the model of a captain.
      As Edmund points out, he is no saint and I don't expect any of our captains to be.

      Despite our best intentions as a community within the SCA, rapier fighters will always find more privileged lords in the society who would see us fail. We look to our captains to lead us, to teach us, and(on occasion) to restrain us. These responsibilities require lords and ladies learned enough to tell friend from foe, courageous enough to fight alongside us, resourceful enough to instruct us, and just enough to repay our friends with gratitude and service even as we struggle with our enemies.

      These qualities are how a captain repays the loyalty of his men.

      Lorenzo Toscano

    • xochimil
      ... I echo what the good Lord says above and after much thought I feel I too should add my voice to this exercise. I have seen noble examples of fine
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 8, 2011
        --- In serapier@yahoogroups.com, "grimlynn11" <grimlynn11@...> wrote:
        >
        > I too believe this be a challenge worth answering, even though I too am not seeking an invitation. (Seeing as I am the Vulpin Reach chirurgeon and am not certain as to how busy I will be.)
        > However I now hereby submit my answer for the approval of the Baron Kazimir Petrovich Pomeshanov.
        >
        <snip>

        I echo what the good Lord says above and after much thought I feel I too should add my voice to this exercise. I have seen noble examples of fine characters posted here, all of which we should aspire to emulate in some way to the best of our abilities.

        But to you Your Excellency, and to others I would propose a bit of a different character.

        Not as carefree in their camaraderie as a cavalier Musketeer nor as a victim turned into a master of his destiny, as Edmond Dantès. But rather as I choose for my example; Diego Alatriste y Tenorio...The main character from the "Captain Alatriste" Series, written by Arturo Pérez-Reverte.

        He was never officially a Captain in the army, but during a incursion when the actual captain had been killed, he stepped up to lead the men to complete the mission and get most of them back safely to their side. The title of Captain has stuck to him since then.

        Throughout the series I have discovered that he has a great sense of both Duty and Loyalty, although he is cognizant that they are at times, both mutually exclusive of each other. He serves his crown as a loyal countryman when needed and not as someone who seeks recognition and reputation from such actions. His loyalty to those he cares for and about, both in battle and in peace is shown time and time again and I realize that one cannot survive long in the world without cherishing friendship.

        As another example of his character, early on in the series, He reluctantly takes custody of a dead comrade's son. Iñigo, to raise him not as his own son, but as his guardian. He could've easily given him to some other family at any other time after his return to Spain, but he elects to keep him. That shows an ability of honor and to keep a promise.

        His skill with the sword and main-gauche is described as someone who has been both lucky enough to have learned to survive a battle and a sword-fight by doing whats needed. He is confident and skilled in his trade. When a sword is drawn, it is never done as a waste of time and in knowing the consequences of taking someone's life.

        He does have his faults;
        He harshly reflects on his past mistakes in life and love, as well as regrets of seeing too much war. Although he wants to be more than what he is, he realizes that he is a product of his environment. This sometimes has put him in compromising situations.

        This reminds me that even while I am inspired, sometimes heroes are human... They have to eat, too. His sense of what is truly right and what is truly wrong does not lend itself completely to idealism, it is tempered by his experiences in reality.

        My ideal is not ideal, but a reminder that WE ALL have the capacity to be a Captain. But even if some will never be, as long as one can practice the qualities of Duty, Prowess, Honor, Loyalty and Justice (Take a moment to think about how each of those apply in the SCA), we make ourselves worthy of being a leader in the best sense:

        One that is not elected, but respected.



        Con Respecto,
        El Senyor Ximón Martillo de Cordoba, OP.
        A concerned Meridian.
      • Howard Rachel
        El Senyor Ximon, What a post! Diego Alatriste! I love how you laid him out so wonderfully, striking right to the heart of him as a leader. A most perfect
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 8, 2011
          El Senyor Ximon,

          What a post!  Diego Alatriste! 

          I love how you laid him out so wonderfully, striking right to the heart of him as a leader.  A most perfect example for us.., and I personally LOVE the fact that he is a gritty, real, and believable.., leading, as you described, not from class, entitlement, or artificial appointment, but because he simply IS a leader!

          My sincere thanks to you, Master Ximon, for sharing this!

          With warmest regards,

          Kazimir Petrovich Pomeshanov


          PS - You have inspired me to go re-read The Fencing Master, *my* favorite Perez-Reverte book!



          On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 5:21 PM, xochimil <xochimil@...> wrote:
           



          --- In serapier@yahoogroups.com, "grimlynn11" <grimlynn11@...> wrote:
          >
          > I too believe this be a challenge worth answering, even though I too am not seeking an invitation. (Seeing as I am the Vulpin Reach chirurgeon and am not certain as to how busy I will be.)
          > However I now hereby submit my answer for the approval of the Baron Kazimir Petrovich Pomeshanov.
          >
          <snip>

          I echo what the good Lord says above and after much thought I feel I too should add my voice to this exercise. I have seen noble examples of fine characters posted here, all of which we should aspire to emulate in some way to the best of our abilities.

          But to you Your Excellency, and to others I would propose a bit of a different character.

          Not as carefree in their camaraderie as a cavalier Musketeer nor as a victim turned into a master of his destiny, as Edmond Dantès. But rather as I choose for my example; Diego Alatriste y Tenorio...The main character from the "Captain Alatriste" Series, written by Arturo Pérez-Reverte.

          He was never officially a Captain in the army, but during a incursion when the actual captain had been killed, he stepped up to lead the men to complete the mission and get most of them back safely to their side. The title of Captain has stuck to him since then.

          Throughout the series I have discovered that he has a great sense of both Duty and Loyalty, although he is cognizant that they are at times, both mutually exclusive of each other. He serves his crown as a loyal countryman when needed and not as someone who seeks recognition and reputation from such actions. His loyalty to those he cares for and about, both in battle and in peace is shown time and time again and I realize that one cannot survive long in the world without cherishing friendship.

          As another example of his character, early on in the series, He reluctantly takes custody of a dead comrade's son. Iñigo, to raise him not as his own son, but as his guardian. He could've easily given him to some other family at any other time after his return to Spain, but he elects to keep him. That shows an ability of honor and to keep a promise.

          His skill with the sword and main-gauche is described as someone who has been both lucky enough to have learned to survive a battle and a sword-fight by doing whats needed. He is confident and skilled in his trade. When a sword is drawn, it is never done as a waste of time and in knowing the consequences of taking someone's life.

          He does have his faults;
          He harshly reflects on his past mistakes in life and love, as well as regrets of seeing too much war. Although he wants to be more than what he is, he realizes that he is a product of his environment. This sometimes has put him in compromising situations.

          This reminds me that even while I am inspired, sometimes heroes are human... They have to eat, too. His sense of what is truly right and what is truly wrong does not lend itself completely to idealism, it is tempered by his experiences in reality.

          My ideal is not ideal, but a reminder that WE ALL have the capacity to be a Captain. But even if some will never be, as long as one can practice the qualities of Duty, Prowess, Honor, Loyalty and Justice (Take a moment to think about how each of those apply in the SCA), we make ourselves worthy of being a leader in the best sense:

          One that is not elected, but respected.

          Con Respecto,
          El Senyor Ximón Martillo de Cordoba, OP.
          A concerned Meridian.


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