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Re: [selfstudyhebrew] Interest in new study groups on this list (Biblical or ...

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  • revo820@aol.com
    I d like to see a course in Modern Hebrew, Thanks Regina In a message dated 11/25/2010 7:53:47 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, berelbeyer@gmail.com writes: Hello
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 2, 2010
      I'd like to see a course in Modern Hebrew,

      Thanks

      Regina


      In a message dated 11/25/2010 7:53:47 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      berelbeyer@... writes:

      Hello friends,

      Since there's been some talk of new groups, I thought I should post a very
      general query. First of all, I should remind everyone that to start a new
      group on this list, all you need is a half dozen or so interested parties
      (including at least one person willing to be the facilitator). Also, I
      should remind everyone that the facilitator does *not* need to know Hebrew.
      In fact, these groups perhaps work best when the facilitator is a
      fellow-student. I will be happy to help get the group started and help with the
      technical side of the collations (either using the traditional collation
      software or Google docs) ... but I can't facilitate myself.

      Perhaps any interested parties can say on list (or privately to me if
      you're shy!) whether they would be interested and tell whether they are
      interested in Biblical or modern and whether they have an preferences for
      textbooks (if so, please name the book).

      Below are the books that I have in my library. We do not have to confine
      our discussion to these by any means (but I would be able to help most with
      formatting questions for groups that use these books).

      BIBLICAL
      Biblical Hebrew Step by Step, Volume 1 by Manhem Mansoor (Baker, 1980)
      Practical Grammar for Classical Hebrew by J. Weingreek (Oxford, 1959)
      Biblical Hebrew Text and Workbook by Bonnie Kittel (Yale, 1989)
      Introduction to Biblical Hebrew by Thomas Lambdin (Scribner, 1971)
      First Hebrew Primer by Simon, Resnikoff, and Motzin (EKS, 2005).

      In my opinion Lamdin (while I happen to love it!) is only suitable for
      someone who *really* loves grammar (and is comfortable with very technical
      grammatical nomenclature). The same may be true for Weingreen, but to a much
      lesser degree (the typical person can learn from Weingreen, perhaps with a
      bit of help with some of the nomenclature ... and in particular which
      details are important and which less); overall, I think Weingreen is a good
      choice. I happen to hate the First Hebrew Primer (I taught from it at my local
      synagogue): it has a shocking number of typos, many gross simplifications,
      and awfully silly (insulting?) stories. It's awfully easy, though ... which
      is a very big strength (though I think that Mansoor is just as easy,
      straightforward, and well-paced).

      MODERN
      Routledge Introductory Course in Modern Hebrew by Giore Etzion (Routledge
      2009)
      Ivrit Shalev Aleph & Bet by Bergman (LA Hebrew Hight, 1982)
      HaYesod by Uveeler & Bronznick (Feldheim [yuck], 1998)
      A Textbook of Israeli Herew by Haiim Rosen (University of Chicago, 1966)
      Hebrew from Scratch (Acadamon 2001)

      I happen to think that the Routledge book is outstanding ... it has the
      overall structure of an inductive method (built around speaking/understanding
      rather than explicitly around grammar), but it teaches grammar thoroughly
      at every step (I'm not sure I said that so well!). The Rosen text is great
      ... but only for understanding Hebrew grammar, probably not for actually
      learning it! Hebrew from Scratch might be a bit difficult to use for a list
      like this (it's an ulpan book), but we could figure something out if
      there's interest. The Bergman book is probably the easiest of the group (in a
      good way, I think); HaYesod the most traditional (i.e., teaches points of
      grammar followed by exercises).

      Any thoughts?

      Berel

      --
      Al titen lamuglegim ledake otcha! ~ Ron Weasley



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