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Re: [selfstudyhebrew] The infinitive for "To Think"

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  • Jason Hare
    Berel, The affinity of ח toward the segol vowels is especially felt in the hiphil and niphal. Notice that the i-vowel in the hiphil (for example,
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 1, 2009
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      Berel,

      The affinity of ח toward the segol vowels is especially felt in the
      hiphil and niphal. Notice that the i-vowel in the hiphil (for example,
      הִבְחִין - "he noticed, distinguished") becomes a segol combination
      when chet is the first radical (for example, הֶחֱלִיט - "he decided" -
      rather than הִחְלִיט*). This is also the case with niphal forms, such
      as the adjectival נִכְבָּד ("honored, respected") in contrast to
      נֶחְמָד ("nice, kind, lovely").

      Regards,
      Jason

      You wrote:
      >
      > See Weingreen, p. 156, Special Note:
      >
      > "There are some Pe Guttural verbs with the (harsh) guttural ח, as
      > חָמַד 'to desire', which take a simple shewa in the Imperfect --
      > יַחְמֹד ; similarly the Imerf.of חָשַךְ , 'to be dark' is
      > יֶחְשַךְ ."
    • Todd Godwin
      folks doing the Mansoor group, I have what is likely a dumb question about something I should have figure out before now. I have noted this mentally before
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 7, 2009
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        folks doing the Mansoor group,

        I have what is likely a dumb question about something I should have figure out before now. I have noted this mentally before but am just getting around to asking about it. If you look at exercise 5 and 6, for example, from what we are doing now on p.110, there is a dot above some of the words in these exercises. I simply do not know what to make of it. 5b has a dot above the beth, 5d has a dot above the aleph, and 5e a dot above the lah-med. what is that? it is not a vowel, those words have vowels. it is not a dagesh. I might guess that it marks the strong or accented syllable, or at least the most aspirated part of a word, if it is a one syllable word. no?



        To: selfstudyhebrew@yahoogroups.com
        From: jaihare@...
        Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2009 13:49:04 +0200
        Subject: Re: [selfstudyhebrew] The infinitive for "To Think"




















        Berel,



        The affinity of � toward the segol vowels is especially felt in the

        hiphil and niphal. Notice that the i-vowel in the hiphil (for example,

        �������� - "he noticed, distinguished") becomes a segol combination

        when chet is the first radical (for example, �������� - "he decided" -

        rather than ��������*). This is also the case with niphal forms, such

        as the adjectival �������� ("honored, respected") in contrast to

        ������� ("nice, kind, lovely").



        Regards,

        Jason



        You wrote:

        >

        > See Weingreen, p. 156, Special Note:

        >

        > "There are some Pe Guttural verbs with the (harsh) guttural �, as

        > ����� 'to desire', which take a simple shewa in the Imperfect --

        > ������� ; similarly the Imerf.of ������ , 'to be dark' is

        > �������� ."

















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      • Jane Newble
        I don t think it s a dumb question. It is quite easily overlooked, as it is such a tiny arrow. It stands for an accent. If you look at page 36, the last
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 7, 2009
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          I don't think it's a dumb question. It is quite easily overlooked, as it is
          such a tiny arrow. It stands for an accent.
          If you look at page 36, the last paragraph before the exercises, he gives an
          example there.
          It starts with: ..."When the accent is indicated, read accordingly. Most
          words are accented on the last syllable. We shall often indicate the
          accented syllable with the sign (<) placed over the letter....."
          Then he explains that an accent on the wrong syllable can change the meaning
          of the word.
          So it is really an aid to reading correctly, with the accent in the right
          place. I just wish it wasn't so small!!
          Hope this helps?

          Jane

          From: "Todd Godwin" <toddgodwin@...>



          folks doing the Mansoor group,

          I have what is likely a dumb question about something I should have figure
          out before now. I have noted this mentally before but am just getting
          around to asking about it. If you look at exercise 5 and 6, for example,
          from what we are doing now on p.110, there is a dot above some of the words
          in these exercises. I simply do not know what to make of it. 5b has a dot
          above the beth, 5d has a dot above the aleph, and 5e a dot above the
          lah-med. what is that? it is not a vowel, those words have vowels. it is
          not a dagesh. I might guess that it marks the strong or accented syllable,
          or at least the most aspirated part of a word, if it is a one syllable word.
          no?
        • Todd Godwin
          thanks Jane. :) To: selfstudyhebrew@yahoogroups.com From: jnewble@gmail.com Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2009 22:00:47 +0000 Subject: Re: [selfstudyhebrew] Mansoor group
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 7, 2009
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            thanks Jane. :)





            To: selfstudyhebrew@yahoogroups.com
            From: jnewble@...
            Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2009 22:00:47 +0000
            Subject: Re: [selfstudyhebrew] Mansoor group question





















            I don't think it's a dumb question. It is quite easily overlooked, as it is

            such a tiny arrow. It stands for an accent.

            If you look at page 36, the last paragraph before the exercises, he gives an

            example there.

            It starts with: ..."When the accent is indicated, read accordingly. Most

            words are accented on the last syllable. We shall often indicate the

            accented syllable with the sign (<) placed over the letter....."

            Then he explains that an accent on the wrong syllable can change the meaning

            of the word.

            So it is really an aid to reading correctly, with the accent in the right

            place. I just wish it wasn't so small!!

            Hope this helps?



            Jane



            From: "Todd Godwin" <toddgodwin@...>



            folks doing the Mansoor group,



            I have what is likely a dumb question about something I should have figure

            out before now. I have noted this mentally before but am just getting

            around to asking about it. If you look at exercise 5 and 6, for example,

            from what we are doing now on p.110, there is a dot above some of the words

            in these exercises. I simply do not know what to make of it. 5b has a dot

            above the beth, 5d has a dot above the aleph, and 5e a dot above the

            lah-med. what is that? it is not a vowel, those words have vowels. it is

            not a dagesh. I might guess that it marks the strong or accented syllable,

            or at least the most aspirated part of a word, if it is a one syllable word.

            no?
























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