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Post-Seleucid Philip coins

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  • egil4870
    I have read on the net (fi in the Benson collection) about posthumous releases of coins from Philip I Philadelphus, and my question is: are those coins linked
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2003
      I have read on the net (fi in the Benson collection) about posthumous
      releases of coins from Philip I Philadelphus, and my question is: are
      those coins linked to the brief period of Parthian suzerainity ca 40
      BC, when their armies under the Roman renegade (alternate protagonist
      of the Republic, pick your choice) Q.Labienus captured Syria and
      Cilicia?

      Or were they simply issued by the Roman authorities? In that case,
      why? The Romans had recently terminated the dynasty, and worse still,
      descendants of Antiochus Grypus were still kings in the neighbouring
      kingdom of Commagene. If I had been Caesar or Augustus, I would have
      tried my best not to remind the Syrians of the Seleukids.
    • Oliver D. Hoover
      Technically, the only Roman officials to strike Posthumous Philips were Aulus Gabinius (marked with the monogram AYGB), Marcus Crassus (with the monogram KRA),
      Message 2 of 2 , May 2, 2003
        Technically, the only Roman officials to strike Posthumous Philips were
        Aulus Gabinius (marked with the monogram AYGB), Marcus Crassus (with the
        monogram KRA), and Gaius Cassius (with the monogram GKAC). All others were
        struck on the authority of the city of Antioch (with the monogram ANTX),
        which received its autonomy from Julius Caesar in 47 BC. Nevertheless,
        because the coins are dated, numismatists have associated the autonomous
        issues with roman imperators and proconsuls operating in Syria. These
        include Q. Caecilius Bassus, L. Staius Murcius, G. Cassius Longinus and the
        infamous Labienus. Posthumous Philips were also produced by the city under
        Augustus, until 17/16 BC. For the Roman series see RPC I and M and K.
        Prieur's The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their Fractions. These will
        also receive thorough discussion in the forthcoming second part of Seleucid
        Coins.

        It is highly unlikely that Posthumous Philips would have stirred up the
        Syrian population against the Romans. By the time that Pompey removed
        Antiochus XIII the dynasty had pretty much annihilated itself and the kings
        that remained were largely ignored by the major Syrian cities. Like most of
        the Hellenistic dynasties, the Seleucids were personal, rather than national
        kings. They were kings because they had the power to call themselves kings
        and compel others to recognize the title, not because they had control of a
        particular piece of territory or because of their conntection to local
        ethnic groups. Thus the Syrian population in general is not likely to have
        understood the Roman removal of the Seleucids as a sign of foreign
        repression of native authority. From the beginning of Seleucid rule, the
        main goal for the cities was to escape from royal domination and for many
        this object was achieved thanks to the Romans.

        Oliver D. Hoover
        Epimeletes




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "egil4870" <jens.jakobsson.187@...>
        To: <seleukids@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, May 02, 2003 6:12 PM
        Subject: [seleukids] Post-Seleucid Philip coins


        > I have read on the net (fi in the Benson collection) about posthumous
        > releases of coins from Philip I Philadelphus, and my question is: are
        > those coins linked to the brief period of Parthian suzerainity ca 40
        > BC, when their armies under the Roman renegade (alternate protagonist
        > of the Republic, pick your choice) Q.Labienus captured Syria and
        > Cilicia?
        >
        > Or were they simply issued by the Roman authorities? In that case,
        > why? The Romans had recently terminated the dynasty, and worse still,
        > descendants of Antiochus Grypus were still kings in the neighbouring
        > kingdom of Commagene. If I had been Caesar or Augustus, I would have
        > tried my best not to remind the Syrians of the Seleukids.
        >
        >
        >
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