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Interesting Cat Facts

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  • natbe@ymail.com
    I saw this ... wanted to share: http://www.xmission.com/~emailbox/trivia.htm Very interesting stuff. It
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 2, 2009
      I saw this ... wanted to share:

      http://www.xmission.com/~emailbox/trivia.htm

      Very interesting stuff.

      It validates the belief that each kitten in a litter may have a different father. I never quite bought that before due to my biology class. And where do all these unneutered males come from? I guess before they are fixed they are "super cats" equipped with radar and little cars to transport them around to the different females.


      Natelle
    • natbe@ymail.com
      I m still very curious as to how many fathers they would be--because some of the characteristics of a kitten would be latant genes--you can t see them in the
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 2, 2009
        I'm still very curious as to how many fathers they would be--because some of the characteristics of a kitten would be latant genes--you can't see them in the parent but the parent is carrying them--and both parents can have latent genes. So there could be 4 different looking kittens based on the characteristics of just 2 cats...  So then although there can be many fathers there can also be kittens that don't look like any of the fathers or the mother either.  I bet breeders know the answer to this question.

        Okay who's going to fess up to being a breeder and answer this question for me about latant genes?

        --- In sdferalcats@yahoogroups.com, "natbe@..." <natbe@...> wrote:
        >
        > I saw this ... wanted to share:
        >
        > http://www.xmission.com/~emailbox/trivia.htm
        > <http://www.xmission.com/%7Eemailbox/trivia.htm>
        >
        > Very interesting stuff.
        >
        > It validates the belief that each kitten in a litter may have a
        > different father. I never quite bought that before due to my biology
        > class. And where do all these unneutered males come from? I guess before
        > they are fixed they are "super cats" equipped with radar and little cars
        > to transport them around to the different females.
        >
        > Natelle
        >
      • katscott52
        Hi, everyone, Thanks Natelle, for sharing this info. We ve all seen litters of multi-colored kittens and wondered how that happened! Litters absolutely can
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 3, 2009
          Hi, everyone,

          Thanks Natelle, for sharing this info. We've all seen litters of multi-colored kittens and wondered how that happened!

          Litters absolutely can have more than one daddy, and many times do, especially if they are feral. I learned this in my veterinary assistant class and then shortly after that saw a wonderful program on the National Geographic channel about cats called, "In the Womb." They went in detail about how this happens. I think the DVD is probably available to rent from NetFlix, and I know it is available for purchase from NG channel. There is also one about dogs. Both programs are fascinating so if you can get them I urge you to watch. I've seen the cat program 3 times!

          Kathleen Scott
        • natbe@ymail.com
          Well what I wanted to know was whether when you have one daddy then are there latent genes enough that a kitten will have a coat color/pattern that looks
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 4, 2009
            Well what I wanted to know was whether when you have one daddy then are there latent genes enough that a kitten will have a coat color/pattern that looks unlike either parent, as well? Everyone makes this assumption that just because the kitten looks completely unlike mamma that she must look like daddy, and that if the kittens look totally unlike each other then all must be because of different daddies and there are no latent genes. I'm talking about traits that don't show up in either parent. Like if you have blue eyes and your mom and dad both have brown eyes. That's a latent gene and you wouldn't assume that because of the blue eyes that your dad is not your dad--you could assume there is a latent gene working--especially if the shape of your face looks like your dad or something else... Wanted to ask that of breeders since they have control over the number of daddies... I'll see if Netflix has that video, but I sure hope they talk about genes.

            Thanks for sharing!

            On Shelter Island, yes I got a newsletter from the hospital that they are moving to Midway... They have a website too that talks about it...



            Natelle


            --- In sdferalcats@yahoogroups.com, "katscott52" <katscott@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi, everyone,
            >
            > Thanks Natelle, for sharing this info. We've all seen litters of multi-colored kittens and wondered how that happened!
            >
            > Litters absolutely can have more than one daddy, and many times do, especially if they are feral. I learned this in my veterinary assistant class and then shortly after that saw a wonderful program on the National Geographic channel about cats called, "In the Womb." They went in detail about how this happens. I think the DVD is probably available to rent from NetFlix, and I know it is available for purchase from NG channel. There is also one about dogs. Both programs are fascinating so if you can get them I urge you to watch. I've seen the cat program 3 times!
            >
            > Kathleen Scott
            >
          • katscott52
            No, the NatGeo In the Womb: Cats doesn t get into genetics as it s only an hour program. As a matter of fact, they showed it again last night, so check the
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 5, 2009
              No, the NatGeo "In the Womb: Cats" doesn't get into genetics as it's only an hour program. As a matter of fact, they showed it again last night, so check the NatGeo schedule and see if they are repeating it.
              They did give a number as to how many "housecat" litters actually have more than one daddy...80%!

              Your genetic questions are very interesting, though. I think our cats that are not purebred have so many different genes in their mix that it's like Forrest Gump's box of chocolates...you never know what you're going to get. Throw in sex-linked characteristics, polydactylism, etc. and every litter is a surprise.

              Kathleen Scott
            • natbe@ymail.com
              Hi Kathleen, I couldn t come up with the show when I did a search on Zap2It. That must be the last showing on the schedule. It sounds good. I wish they would
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 5, 2009
                Hi Kathleen, I couldn't come up with the show when I did a search on
                Zap2It. That must be the last showing on the schedule. It sounds good. I
                wish they would get into the genetics, though. It's so interesting.

                More often than not with the litters I've seen since starting all this
                cat horror in 2004, there are a couple of ktitens looking totally unlike
                each other and unlike their mamma. You should see the mammas of the
                litters Dorothy caught this summer.

                There was a DSH black mamma taht they'd caught and let her nurse her one
                tortie girl and 2 beautiful fluffy tabbies, one gray and one brown.

                There was the DSH tabby mamma she caught after picking up the 6 kittens
                I put photos up earlier about Kittens: one orange tabby, one brown and
                white tabby, one orange and white tabby, one tortie, one fluffy torbie,
                and one beige with crinkly ear.

                Then I remember she showed me a DSH tortie mamma prior to fixing her
                that apparently was responsible for 3 med-hair siamese and one med-hair
                charcoal tabby.

                In my colony it was a fluffy torbie that had so many gorgeous
                kittens--all different from each other and none looking like her. I
                never caught any of the toms and only rarely saw one or two. They
                traveled a few blocks from the river to mate! None of them even lived in
                the colony!

                Natelle
                --- In sdferalcats@yahoogroups.com, "katscott52" <katscott@...> wrote:
                >
                > No, the NatGeo "In the Womb: Cats" doesn't get into genetics as it's
                only an hour program. As a matter of fact, they showed it again last
                night, so check the NatGeo schedule and see if they are repeating it.
                > They did give a number as to how many "housecat" litters actually have
                more than one daddy...80%!
                >
                > Your genetic questions are very interesting, though. I think our cats
                that are not purebred have so many different genes in their mix that
                it's like Forrest Gump's box of chocolates...you never know what you're
                going to get. Throw in sex-linked characteristics, polydactylism, etc.
                and every litter is a surprise.
                >
                > Kathleen Scott
                >
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