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Re: Whooosh, *BLAM*, whack the Earth

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  • Thad Floryan
    ... Yes. The recent space.com article is here: the same article at Yahoo is here:
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 2, 2007
      --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Traub" <mvtraub@...> wrote:
      > [...]
      > Did you read that they may have found a secondary impact crater from
      > the Tunguska event. Mike Traub

      Yes. The recent space.com article is here:

      <http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/070626_st_tunguska_crater.html>

      the same article at Yahoo is here:

      <http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20070626/sc_space/cratercouldsolve1908tunguskameteormystery>

      and an earlier (2001) space.com Tunguska article is here:

      <http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/planetearth/tunguska_mystery_011031.html>
    • Thad Floryan
      ... Because Printable version can be selected, making it easier to read. Neglected to add the following which rebuts Longo s conclusion:
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 2, 2007
        --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "Thad Floryan" <thad@...> wrote:
        > [...]
        > the same article at Yahoo is here:
        > [...]

        Because "Printable version" can be selected, making it easier to read.

        Neglected to add the following which rebuts Longo's conclusion:

        <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/06/27/lake_crater_tunguska/>

        In which Dr Gareth Collins, a research associate at Imperial College
        London, told the BBC: "The impact-cratering community does not accept
        structures as craters unless there is evidence of high temperatures
        and high pressures. That requires evidence of rocks that have been
        melted or rocks that have been ground up by the impact."

        The Tunguska event took place on June 30, 1908. The blast, which had
        the energy of about 1,000 Hiroshima-sized nukes, was so bright it was
        even seen in the London skies. No debris from the explosion has ever
        been found, much less any traces of an impact.

        Dr Collins says the lake Longo and his team have studied is not
        consistent with what we already know about Tunguska. The angle of
        impact is wrong, any fragments surviving the initial blast would be
        moving too slowly, and there are trees older than 100 years still
        standing near the lake, making it unlikely anything from space crashed
        nearby.
      • Thad Floryan
        Here s something new: you don t want to be operating your SCTs anywhere near a Tunguska-like event due to acid rain which would wreak havoc with the coatings
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 3, 2007
          Here's something new: you don't want to be operating your SCTs
          anywhere near a Tunguska-like event due to acid rain which would
          wreak havoc with the coatings on your corrector and other glass.

          A paper is being presented today entitled: "Acid rain after the
          Tunguska explosion: Tropospheric fate of shock-generated nitrogen
          oxides" by G. Curci, G. Visconti, D. J. Jacob, and M. J. Evans.

          I received a copy yesterday and converted it to PDF. The original
          PowerPoint presentation can be found here [2.3 MB PPT]:

          <http://pumpkin.aquila.infn.it/gabri/downld/tunguska_eng.ppt>

          and the "temporary" location of the PDF version is:

          <http://thadlabs.com/FILES/tunguska_eng.pdf> [2.7 MB]

          Interesting pictures, graphics, and analyses. Don't forget to
          advance beyond "The End" for the extra slides. :-)
        • John Mahony
          ... It really _has_ been cloudy in your part of the world, hasn t it ;) -John
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 3, 2007
            --- Thad Floryan <thad@...> wrote:

            > Here's something new: you don't want to be operating your SCTs
            > anywhere near a Tunguska-like event due to acid rain which would
            > wreak havoc with the coatings on your corrector and other glass.

            It really _has_ been cloudy in your part of the world, hasn't it ;)

            -John



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          • John Mahony
            ... See the movie Silent Running . Different disaster, same concept. -John
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 3, 2007
              --- Thad Floryan <thad@...> wrote:
              >
              > This brings up an interesting question, though: how much (and of what)
              > would be required to restock/rebuild Earth's fauna and flora if a PHO
              > (Potentially Hazardous Object (NASA's acronym)) was found to be headed
              > Earth's way and an "ark" (for wont of a better term) were to be built
              > and orbited safely away from Earth for later return and retrieval?

              See the movie "Silent Running". Different disaster, same concept.

              -John



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            • Thad Floryan
              ... If it s not clouds, it s upper air turbulence. I checked around 9pm and just again, a moment ago (it s 2am here now), and the sky is perfectly clear but
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 3, 2007
                --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- Thad Floryan <thad@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Here's something new: you don't want to be operating your SCTs
                > > anywhere near a Tunguska-like event due to acid rain which would
                > > wreak havoc with the coatings on your corrector and other glass.
                >
                > It really _has_ been cloudy in your part of the world, hasn't it ;)

                If it's not clouds, it's upper air turbulence.

                I checked around 9pm and just again, a moment ago (it's 2am here now),
                and the sky is perfectly clear but stars are blinking like Christmas
                tree lights. A quick test with my ED80 and Jupiter is a murky blur
                and it's not because of the (nearly) full Moon. The outside temp is
                62.4F, no wind, RH is 75% (and 39% where I'm sitting inside now).

                The ClearSky Clocks indicate everything should be almost perfect, but
                obviously they aren't accounting for the real problem(s). You can see
                for yourself (6 CSCs flanking me within 10 miles):

                <http://thadlabs.com/ASTRO/view-bracket.htm>


                'Tis really getting to be a bummer.
              • Thad Floryan
                ... Good movie (last watched it about 5 years or so ago) but they re orbiting live stuff in many, many spacegoing greenhouses ( til the order is given to
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 3, 2007
                  --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- Thad Floryan <thad@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > This brings up an interesting question, though: how much (and of what)
                  > > would be required to restock/rebuild Earth's fauna and flora if a PHO
                  > > (Potentially Hazardous Object (NASA's acronym)) was found to be headed
                  > > Earth's way and an "ark" (for wont of a better term) were to be built
                  > > and orbited safely away from Earth for later return and retrieval?
                  >
                  > See the movie "Silent Running". Different disaster, same concept.


                  Good movie (last watched it about 5 years or so ago) but they're
                  orbiting live stuff in many, many spacegoing greenhouses ('til the
                  order is given to destroy them all). I was thinking more of what's
                  the lowest-common-denominator required to be able to recreate species
                  so that "everything" might be able to be carried/transported in one
                  craft.
                • Thad Floryan
                  ... Bollocks. It s 4:30am, outside temp is 60.1F, 78% RH, dew point 54F, barometric pressure is 29.83, wind is zero, and the stars are still blinking like a
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 3, 2007
                    --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "Thad Floryan" <thad@...> wrote:
                    > [...]
                    > I checked around 9pm and just again, a moment ago (it's 2am here now),
                    > and the sky is perfectly clear but stars are blinking like Christmas
                    > tree lights. A quick test with my ED80 and Jupiter is a murky blur
                    > and it's not because of the (nearly) full Moon. The outside temp is
                    > 62.4F, no wind, RH is 75% (and 39% where I'm sitting inside now).

                    Bollocks.

                    It's 4:30am, outside temp is 60.1F, 78% RH, dew point 54F, barometric
                    pressure is 29.83, wind is zero, and the stars are still blinking like
                    a fleet of police cars' bubble-gum machines.

                    I'm going to bed since I'm forgetting what my scopes even look like.
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