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RE: [sct-user] Ethos

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  • Robert Harris
    Can the human eye take in a 100 degree AFOV? I thought 82 was about all you could see at once? -Robert ________________________________ From:
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 30, 2007
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      Can the human eye take in a 100 degree AFOV? I thought 82 was about all
      you could see at once?

      -Robert

      ________________________________

      From: sct-user@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Rod Mollise
      Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2007 2:43 PM
      To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [sct-user] Ethos



      The big question will be "how much"...

      400 bucks and I'm in...especially if I can sell my 12mm Type 2 for a
      decent
      price.

      Who needs 100 AFOV? Me. ;-)

      I decided.

      :-)

      Peace,
      Rod Mollise
      Author of:
      Choosing and Using a Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope
      and
      The Urban Astronomer's Guide
      <http://skywatch.brainiac.com/astroland
      <http://skywatch.brainiac.com/astroland> >

      _____

      From: sct-user@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com>
      [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com> ]
      On Behalf
      Of bdittus@... <mailto:bdittus%40comcast.net>
      Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2007 2:17 PM
      To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: RE: [sct-user] Ethos

      Rod

      You can't just make that kinda remark to this group, spill them beans,
      what
      's the scoop?????

      Bill

      -------------- Original message --------------
      From: "Sam Barziza" <sbarziza@consolidat
      <mailto:sbarziza%40consolidated.net> ed.net>
      Hey Rod:

      What do you mean ? Is this a new product that Tele Vue is coming
      out with ?

      Com'on spill it, tell us what you know !!

      Sam

      _____

      From: sct-user@yahoogroup <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com> s.com
      [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroup <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com> s.com]
      On
      Behalf
      Of Rod Mollise
      Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2007 11:17 AM
      To: sct-user@yahoogroup <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com> s.com;
      Meade-Uncensored@ <mailto:Meade-Uncensored%40yahoogroups.com>
      yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [sct-user] Ethos

      Does the word "Ethos" mean anything to you? Together with the name
      "TeleVue"? It will soon, it will...

      :-)

      Peace,
      Rod Mollise
      Author of:
      Choosing and Using a Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope
      and
      The Urban Astronomer's Guide
      <http://skywatch. <http://skywatch.
      <http://skywatch.brainiac.com/astroland
      <http://skywatch.brainiac.com/astroland> >
      brainiac.com/astroland>
      brainiac.com/astroland>

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paul Gustafson
      ... In many states police officers are restricted from field duty as visually deficient if their monocular peripheral vision is less than 120 degrees
      Message 2 of 21 , May 1 7:43 AM
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        "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can the human eye take in a 100 degree
        > AFOV? I thought 82 was about all
        > you could see at once?

        In many states police officers are restricted from field duty as
        visually deficient if their monocular peripheral vision is less than
        120 degrees horizontal and 100 degrees vertical. When I worked for the
        Army Corp of Engineers many moons ago they had a similar restriction on
        driving their vehicles.

        Paul Gustafson
      • Mike Overacker
        When I viewed through this eyepiece, I could see out to 82 degrees on their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the eyepiece. I could
        Message 3 of 21 , May 1 8:00 AM
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          When I viewed through this eyepiece, I could see out to 82 degrees on
          their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the
          eyepiece. I could then look around and see the full field. It felt a bit
          odd at first, but then looking around in the field was kinda cool, but
          definitely a different feeling.

          I would imagine I could easily get used to this eyepiece. I was very
          sharp, and they used a dollar bill in the field on Sunday to show the
          sharpness of the optics. It was very sharp through the field, and I
          noticed no obvious distortion.

          Mike Overacker
          http://www.astronomyreviews.com

          Paul Gustafson wrote:

          > "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Can the human eye take in a 100 degree
          > > AFOV? I thought 82 was about all
          > > you could see at once?
          >
          > In many states police officers are restricted from field duty as
          > visually deficient if their monocular peripheral vision is less than
          > 120 degrees horizontal and 100 degrees vertical. When I worked for the
          > Army Corp of Engineers many moons ago they had a similar restriction on
          > driving their vehicles.
          >
          > Paul Gustafson
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          >No virus found in this incoming message.
          >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.6.2/782 - Release Date: 5/1/2007 2:10 AM
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Robert Harris
          Mike mentioned I could see out to 82 degrees on their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the eyepiece. . What kind of eye relief
          Message 4 of 21 , May 1 8:19 AM
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            Mike mentioned "I could see out to 82 degrees on
            their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the
            eyepiece. ". What kind of eye relief does that translate to? I imagine
            its pretty tight.

            -Robert


            ________________________________

            From: sct-user@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Mike Overacker
            Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 10:00 AM
            To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [sct-user] Re: Ethos



            When I viewed through this eyepiece, I could see out to 82 degrees on
            their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the
            eyepiece. I could then look around and see the full field. It felt a bit

            odd at first, but then looking around in the field was kinda cool, but
            definitely a different feeling.

            I would imagine I could easily get used to this eyepiece. I was very
            sharp, and they used a dollar bill in the field on Sunday to show the
            sharpness of the optics. It was very sharp through the field, and I
            noticed no obvious distortion.

            Mike Overacker
            http://www.astronomyreviews.com <http://www.astronomyreviews.com>

            Paul Gustafson wrote:

            > "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Can the human eye take in a 100 degree
            > > AFOV? I thought 82 was about all
            > > you could see at once?
            >
            > In many states police officers are restricted from field duty as
            > visually deficient if their monocular peripheral vision is less than
            > 120 degrees horizontal and 100 degrees vertical. When I worked for the
            > Army Corp of Engineers many moons ago they had a similar restriction
            on
            > driving their vehicles.
            >
            > Paul Gustafson
            >
            >
            >
            >----------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >No virus found in this incoming message.
            >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.6.2/782 - Release Date: 5/1/2007
            2:10 AM
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Chris Peterson
            It depends how you define FOV. The human eye has significant sensitivity to nearly 180°. Photopic acuity is limited to less than the central degree, but that
            Message 5 of 21 , May 1 8:56 AM
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              It depends how you define FOV. The human eye has significant sensitivity
              to nearly 180°. Photopic acuity is limited to less than the central
              degree, but that is only important for lunar and planetary viewing,
              where a wide field EP probably isn't necessary. Scotopic acuity is good
              for about 80°, but you get most of your information from the central
              area. Basically, you can't see well at all unless you move your eye
              around, which large FOV eyepieces depend on. (BTW, scotopic acuity at
              its best is very poor, which is why you don't need very good optics for
              visual observation of most DSOs.)

              Chris

              *****************************************
              Chris L Peterson
              Cloudbait Observatory
              http://www.cloudbait.com


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Robert Harris" <rharris@...>
              To: <sct-user@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 2:19 PM
              Subject: RE: [sct-user] Ethos


              > Can the human eye take in a 100 degree AFOV? I thought 82 was about
              > all
              > you could see at once?
              >
              > -Robert
            • Thad Floryan
              ... Ewww, might require squirting some eyeball grease into your eye to emulate the oil-spaced objective phenomenon of certain APOs. :-) That s one reason I
              Message 6 of 21 , May 1 11:33 AM
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                --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
                >
                > Mike mentioned "I could see out to 82 degrees on
                > their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the
                > eyepiece. ". What kind of eye relief does that translate to? I imagine
                > its pretty tight.

                Ewww, might require squirting some eyeball grease into your eye to
                emulate the oil-spaced objective phenomenon of certain APOs. :-)

                That's one reason I like my Pentax EPs -- 20mm eye relief.
              • John Mahony
                ... But is that 120 for one eye or both? Police officers aren t normally looking through monocular telescopes. -John
                Message 7 of 21 , May 1 1:43 PM
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                  --- Paul Gustafson <laservet@...> wrote:

                  > "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Can the human eye take in a 100 degree
                  > > AFOV? I thought 82 was about all
                  > > you could see at once?
                  >
                  > In many states police officers are restricted from field duty as
                  > visually deficient if their monocular peripheral vision is less than
                  > 120 degrees horizontal and 100 degrees vertical. When I worked for the
                  > Army Corp of Engineers many moons ago they had a similar restriction on
                  > driving their vehicles.

                  But is that 120 for one eye or both? Police officers aren't normally looking
                  through monocular telescopes.

                  -John

                  __________________________________________________
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                • Mike Overacker
                  Hehehehehe...... It isn t quite that bad, but I am used to the pretty solid 20mm eye relief from my TV Radians, so looking through the Ethos was a bit odd. I
                  Message 8 of 21 , May 1 1:46 PM
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                    Hehehehehe...... It isn't quite that bad, but I am used to the pretty
                    solid 20mm eye relief from my TV Radians, so looking through the Ethos
                    was a bit odd. I would imagine if someone was used to getting very close
                    to an eyepiece, it might not seem so odd to them. I would say that my
                    eye relief with the Ethos was probably in the 5mm to 7mm range, taking a
                    guess. It does seem to be an excellent eyepiece. When I asked Al Nagler
                    what the selling price would be, he recommended that I start saving now,
                    and then chuckled. I think Al was taking the opportunity to mess with my
                    head, but I think their may be a little truth behind the laugh.

                    I did get a 35mm Panoptic at the TV NEAF table, so I am willing to wait
                    for the Ethos release. The 35 Pan should keep me busy for a while.

                    Mike

                    Thad Floryan wrote:

                    > --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com>,
                    > "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Mike mentioned "I could see out to 82 degrees on
                    > > their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the
                    > > eyepiece. ". What kind of eye relief does that translate to? I imagine
                    > > its pretty tight.
                    >
                    > Ewww, might require squirting some eyeball grease into your eye to
                    > emulate the oil-spaced objective phenomenon of certain APOs. :-)
                    >
                    > That's one reason I like my Pentax EPs -- 20mm eye relief.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    >
                    >No virus found in this incoming message.
                    >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                    >Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.6.2/782 - Release Date: 5/1/2007 2:10 AM
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Robert Harris
                    Televue has a page up on this eyepiece now: http://www.televue.com/engine/page.asp?ID=2 The following specs are from that page: Tele Vue 13mm Ethos
                    Message 9 of 21 , May 1 2:15 PM
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                      Televue has a page up on this eyepiece now:
                      http://www.televue.com/engine/page.asp?ID=2

                      The following specs are from that page:
                      Tele Vue 13mm Ethos Specifications

                      * Apparent Field: 100º
                      * Focal Length: 13mm
                      * Effective Field Stop: larger than a 16mm Nagler Type 5
                      * Eye Relief: 15mm (accepts DIOPTRX(tm) eyesight astigmatism corrector)
                      * Barrel Size: 2"/1¼"
                      * Weight: 1.24lbs.

                      Availability: Summer/Fall 2007

                      The (advertised) eye relief is much better than I anticipated!

                      -Robert




                      ________________________________

                      From: sct-user@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Thad Floryan
                      Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 1:34 PM
                      To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [sct-user] Re: Ethos



                      --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sct-user%40yahoogroups.com> , "Robert Harris" <rharris@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Mike mentioned "I could see out to 82 degrees on
                      > their target, but to get to 100 degrees, I had to get right down on the
                      > eyepiece. ". What kind of eye relief does that translate to? I imagine
                      > its pretty tight.

                      Ewww, might require squirting some eyeball grease into your eye to
                      emulate the oil-spaced objective phenomenon of certain APOs. :-)

                      That's one reason I like my Pentax EPs -- 20mm eye relief.






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Paul Gustafson
                      ... than ... the ... restriction on ... looking ... Each eye is tested separately and must be at least 120 degrees horizontal. Paul Gustafson
                      Message 10 of 21 , May 1 2:18 PM
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                        John Mahony <jmmahony@...> wrote:
                        > > In many states police officers are restricted from field duty as
                        > > visually deficient if their monocular peripheral vision is less
                        than
                        > > 120 degrees horizontal and 100 degrees vertical. When I worked for
                        the
                        > > Army Corp of Engineers many moons ago they had a similar
                        restriction on
                        > > driving their vehicles.
                        >
                        > But is that 120 for one eye or both? Police officers aren't normally
                        looking
                        > through monocular telescopes.

                        Each eye is tested separately and must be at least 120 degrees
                        horizontal.

                        Paul Gustafson
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