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How about a focal reducer or 2" diagonal

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  • electricgolf@abac.com
    Reading more, I came across two other potential options for finding DSO easier with my Celestron G8: 1) Use a Meade or Celestron f/6.3 focal reducer. If I did
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 1, 2001
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      Reading more, I came across two other potential options for finding
      DSO easier with my Celestron G8:

      1) Use a Meade or Celestron f/6.3 focal reducer. If I did this would
      you recommend the 32mm ep with 52 degree fov, the standard ep 25mm
      that came with scope, or another eyepiece to increase the apparent
      field of view?

      2) Use a 2" diagonal. If so - how does it attach (same as 1 1/4") to
      my G8?
      Also, what eyepieces would you recommend with the 2" diagonal that
      would dramatically increase the fov?

      Remember - I am budget conscious. My purpose is to find DSO easier.
      The Telrad may make it easier to "Point" scope to an area, but I
      still have to find it in the scope. Hopefully, dramatically
      increasing the field of view will do it.

      - Mar
    • dwyman
      I think you should think more about the advice you ve already been given. Get a Telrad or similar device. If your finder is smaller than 8X50mm then get one
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2001
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        I think you should think more about the advice you've already been
        given. Get a Telrad or similar device. If your finder is smaller than
        8X50mm then get one that size or bigger. Then get a 32mm or 40mm
        eyepiece. You use the Telrad to get you close to the right area. With a
        little practice it should be visible in the finder. If you center it in
        the finder it should be in the eyepiece. It's really no more difficult
        than that. The most important thing to remember here, is that the
        Telrad, finder and eyepiece field should all be aiming at the same
        place. The Telrad and finder both have adjustments to do this. Start
        early in the evening and pick out a bright star or even a far away land
        object. Get them all lined up and the rest is easy.

        Don Wyman
        --
        There is no such thing as gravity, the Earth just sucks.
      • Mark Webb - ElectricGolf
        In your response to someone else on a different question you said As to my own past, I started out with a C-8 in 1981. Did I learn to star hop with it?
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 1, 2001
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          In your response to someone else on a different question you said "As to my own past, I started out with a C-8 in 1981. Did I learn to star hop with it? Heavens no. I learned how to use the setting circles effectively". So -why are you telling me that a telrad will be what I need and "I think you should think more about the advice you've already been given". That's why I am asking - maybe someone else will have a different idea than you.

          With a good set of charts and a telrad - which I have - my experience is similar to your first experience with your c8 - star hopping or simply putting it in general area does not help a novice like me. It is not that easy (as evidenced by your own first experiences). Using the setting circles, telrad, and a wider field of view in scope seem much more logical. I can get it close myself by star hopping because I know the visible sky quite well - it's the finer scanning that I am not good at. You advice to me just seems a little contradictory to your own first experiences.

          - Mark
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: dwyman
          To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, October 01, 2001 9:26 PM
          Subject: Re: [sct-user] How about a focal reducer or 2" diagonal


          I think you should think more about the advice you've already been
          given. Get a Telrad or similar device. If your finder is smaller than
          8X50mm then get one that size or bigger. Then get a 32mm or 40mm
          eyepiece. You use the Telrad to get you close to the right area. With a
          little practice it should be visible in the finder. If you center it in
          the finder it should be in the eyepiece. It's really no more difficult
          than that. The most important thing to remember here, is that the
          Telrad, finder and eyepiece field should all be aiming at the same
          place. The Telrad and finder both have adjustments to do this. Start
          early in the evening and pick out a bright star or even a far away land
          object. Get them all lined up and the rest is easy.

          Don Wyman
          --
          There is no such thing as gravity, the Earth just sucks.

          Visit the sct-user home page at:



          http://members.aol.com/RMOLLISE/index4.html

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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Alex Frade
          ... would ... Use the advice that others have been giving you so far. A good sky Atlas is essential as is a 8 x 50 finder. Telrad is great if you have in dark
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 2, 2001
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            --- In sct-user@y..., electricgolf@a... wrote:
            > Reading more, I came across two other potential options for finding
            > DSO easier with my Celestron G8:
            >
            > 1) Use a Meade or Celestron f/6.3 focal reducer. If I did this
            would
            > you recommend the 32mm ep with 52 degree fov, the standard ep 25mm
            > that came with scope, or another eyepiece to increase the apparent
            > field of view?
            >
            Use the advice that others have been giving you so far. A good sky
            Atlas is essential as is a 8 x 50 finder. Telrad is great if you have
            in dark skies. Also a good sky program is helpful ( Cartes Du Ciel
            comes to mind and its free) where you can match the charts you print
            to you finderscope as you can reverse them and invert them.
            If you are interested in decent eyepieces try Hands on Optics
            (handsonoptics.com). Gary has the GTO's SP 32mm and 40mm at very
            reasonable prices and I have seen some good reviews on them. You can
            try DSC's but star hopping will teach you the sky much better and
            make it a lot easier to find the next time.

            Clear Skies

            Alex Frade
            26.10*N, 80.10*W
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