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Go To alignment under restricted skies

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  • Frank
    Losmandy German Equatorial mounts with the Gemini system also allow you to pick your own alignment stars. After picking the second star, the mount will tell
    Message 1 of 26 , Jul 7, 2011
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      Losmandy German Equatorial mounts with the Gemini system also allow you to pick your own alignment stars. After picking the second star, the mount will tell you approximately how many arc minutes you are off the pole and you can tweak it in that direction to get better alignment, even if you can't see Polaris. However, if you align using five or more stars, the Gemini will just compensate for the polar offset and objects will always be in the finder and will usually be somewhere in a low power field.

      I use a C-11 on a Losmandy G-11 Gemini mount which I roll out of the garage where the entire northern sky is obscured almost to the zenith. I aim the axis roughly north, do a five star alignment and I'm right on target for the rest of the evening. You can even align on the moon, planets or DSO's. Again, not good enough for imaging, but fine for visual work.

      If you use a C-8, the smaller Losmandy G-8 may be adequate. They are a little pricey, but well worth it.

      Frank Klicar
      Downers Grove, IL
    • Lou
      Thank you for all your input I ll try all your suggestions,now all I need is some clear sky to try it out. I m from PA and now live in N.C. and the sky are
      Message 2 of 26 , Jul 8, 2011
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        Thank you for all your input I'll try all your suggestions,now all I need is some clear sky to try it out. I'm from PA and now live in N.C. and the sky are very murky in the south compared to the the north.

        Again Thanks.

        Lou


        --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "ikc46118" <bruce.bowman@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well, I'm over 1500 in *total* DSOs viewed...the result of 25+ years of intermittent viewing (and careful note-taking) from a relatively poor site in central Indiana.
        >
        > There's enough up there to keep any dedicated amateur busy...in fact I've actually had people ask me if I thought I'd ever run out of things to look at!
        >
        > Bruce
        >
        >
        > --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "Rod Mollise" <rmollise@> wrote:
        > >
        > > They get harder and smaller once you pass 800. ;-)
        > >
        > >
        > > Peace,
        > > Rod Mollise
        > > Rod's new book:
        > > _Choosing and Using a New CAT_
        > > Time to waste? Waste it with Uncle Rod's Astro Blog:
        > >
        > > http://uncle-rods.blogspot.com/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: sct-user@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        > > Of ikc46118
        > > Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 9:22 AM
        > > To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: [sct-user] Re: A question of the Herschel objects
        > >
        > > I've seen all the Herschel 400 and about 90% of the 800. Using scopes of
        > > 12-13" aperture I've found that all of them were visible using eyepieces of
        > > the 20-27mm range. Your mileage may vary.
        > >
        > > My biggest help in finding fainter objects is printing POSS images and
        > > taking those with me out in the field. I mostly use the SEDS site at
        > > http://spider.seds.org/ngc/ngc.html for this purpose.
        > >
        > > Hope that helps,
        > > Bruce
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In sct-user@yahoogroups.com, "Lou" <loubandit4012@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I am thinking about trying my hand at the Herschel objects, I have a LX200
        > > classic 10" f10. What is the best eyepiece to use to track these objects. I
        > > have used a 26mm for most of the Messier objects but I'm sure the Herschel's
        > > are a bit more illusive any help will be greatly appreciated. I have fairly
        > > dark skies in my back yard,north south and west are pretty good, east is
        > > pretty well wiped out my the city of Morganton NC.
        > > >
        > > > Thanks
        > > > Lou
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Visit the sct-user home page at:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > http://skywatch.brainiac.com/SCThpYahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        >
      • Bob Geoghegan
        Thanks Frank and John. This is helping me a lot to get an idea of the procedures and for when the mount is finally in my hands. Someday I may go for
        Message 3 of 26 , Jul 10, 2011
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          Thanks Frank and John. This is helping me a lot to get an idea of the
          procedures and for when the mount is finally in my hands. Someday I may go
          for something as nice as a Losmandy but for now the budget won't reach. At
          the moment my starting point looks like an 8" on a CG-5 / ASGT. They seem
          to be readily available at about 2/3 the new price on AMart or CN. The
          choice gets tougher if the budget goes beyond that or if I find a good deal
          on a larger OTA.

          Thanks again to everyone,

          Bob G



          From: sct-user@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sct-user@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of Frank
          Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 10:51 AM
          To: sct-user@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [sct-user] Go To alignment under restricted skies





          Losmandy German Equatorial mounts with the Gemini system also allow you to
          pick your own alignment stars. After picking the second star, the mount will
          tell you approximately how many arc minutes you are off the pole and you can
          tweak it in that direction to get better alignment, even if you can't see
          Polaris. However, if you align using five or more stars, the Gemini will
          just compensate for the polar offset and objects will always be in the
          finder and will usually be somewhere in a low power field.

          I use a C-11 on a Losmandy G-11 Gemini mount which I roll out of the garage
          where the entire northern sky is obscured almost to the zenith. I aim the
          axis roughly north, do a five star alignment and I'm right on target for the
          rest of the evening. You can even align on the moon, planets or DSO's.
          Again, not good enough for imaging, but fine for visual work.

          If you use a C-8, the smaller Losmandy G-8 may be adequate. They are a
          little pricey, but well worth it.

          Frank Klicar
          Downers Grove, IL





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