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Re: [scrumdevelopment] How to distribute engineers among project teams

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  • Arun Batchu
    Perhaps you are talking about a Matrix ed organization taking fungibility of resources to the extreme, treating human resources as CPU resources. It is my
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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      Perhaps you are talking about a Matrix'ed organization taking fungibility of resources to the extreme, treating human "resources" as CPU resources. It is my take that it is almost next to impossible to utilize scrum . Scrum is an ecosystem, take away a few of the supporting ideas/principles/and practices, you will have a degenerate system that will not work.

      You should get hold of Slack, by Tom DeMarco who writes very convincingly about the cost of task switching.

      However, there might be a few people in this community who might have attempted /failed/passed Scrum in a matrixed environment run by Taylorist efficiency experts.

      -Arun.

      On 11/2/05, Sam Edwards <sedwards@...> wrote:

      I work for a company that typically has 5-10 projects going on simultaneously, some very short (a week or two), some quite long (up to a year).  I like the team concept of Agile, but find it is difficult to keep the same people on the same project team for the full course of a project.  Sometimes a new, higher-priority project comes along, or sometimes an existing project discovers it needs expertise only found in a member of a different project.  How do you minimize the disruption that naturally occurs when people are forced to switch projects?  A second question: is it acceptable to have the same person a member of more than one project?  If so, does that person then commit to a certain amount of time for each project?

       

      Thanks in advance for your advice.



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    • Ron Jeffries
      ... If you re going to swap people, you re going to have disruption. That will cost all the projects in terms of delay and bugs. If that s what your company
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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        On Wednesday, November 2, 2005, at 10:42:19 AM, Sam Edwards wrote:

        > I work for a company that typically has 5-10 projects going on
        > simultaneously, some very short (a week or two), some quite long (up to
        > a year). I like the team concept of Agile, but find it is difficult to
        > keep the same people on the same project team for the full course of a
        > project. Sometimes a new, higher-priority project comes along, or
        > sometimes an existing project discovers it needs expertise only found in
        > a member of a different project. How do you minimize the disruption
        > that naturally occurs when people are forced to switch projects? A
        > second question: is it acceptable to have the same person a member of
        > more than one project? If so, does that person then commit to a certain
        > amount of time for each project?

        If you're going to swap people, you're going to have disruption.
        That will cost all the projects in terms of delay and bugs. If
        that's what your company wants, by all means keep doing it.

        To minimize the problems when new people show up, pair programming
        is a very useful technique.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Just because XP doesn't talk about how to make fire, should we assume it
        requires us to use sticks? -- Richard MacDonald
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