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Re: Screenshot - Mock-up Recommendations

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  • Deb
    ... interface requirements. In every role I have had the client as always recieved a mockup on how the web pages for the application will look. This is a very
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2005
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      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Graeme Matthew" <scrum@c...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hi all
      >
      > Can any of you recommend or relate to past experience on user
      interface requirements. In every role I have had the client as always
      recieved a mockup on how the web pages for the application will look.
      This is a very time consuming task and I sometimes wonder if it causes
      more hassle than its worth ...
      > Graeme
      >

      Not sure if this is what you are looking for: If you can get the
      customer to accept that look-and-feel is different from functionality:
      work out the details of functionality using very simple tools.

      We did this interactively in our iteration planning meeting with our
      customers (admittetly, it was for Finance, not a fancy Flash
      websites!). Some of our favourite tools were 1) Excel and 2) Alias
      Sketchbook combined with i-Pen from Finger systems (a mouse that
      operates like a pen).

      Sketchbook allows you to capture a screenshot of something similar or
      related, cut it up, and mark it up. Along the lines of: an arrow to
      show "move this here" or a big X thru something removed. Write on new
      titles etc.

      Excel basically gives you a grid to work with that's easy to
      rearrange. It works well for tabular layouts.

      This allows you to walk thru UI funtionality together (both tech and
      customer) without distracting colours, fonts, toolbars. This
      discussion can yield subtle changes that otherwise might not be caught
      till later. It can also catch a design that looks good but will cost
      half as much with minor changes recommended by tech folks. (But
      perhaps you are doing these things already in your current process).

      Our customers enjoyed seeing these sketches during the demo, as
      reminders of what they agreed to - being gestural, they remember the
      discussion better!

      You can address look-and-feel as a separate story, without distraction
      of features. It may be helpful to do this up front... and be prepared
      to adjust afterwards :-)

      deb
    • Steven Mak
      Hi, I mainly work on website development. My team mainly focuses on functionality rather than look-and-feel (though they can be tightly couple in some cases).
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2005
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        Hi,

        I mainly work on website development. My team mainly
        focuses on functionality rather than look-and-feel
        (though they can be tightly couple in some cases).

        I use the following as mock-up:

        1) OpenOffice - Draw, they provide basic windows
        widgets, very basic but free

        2) Visio - Here's the tricks
        http://www.guuui.com/issues/02_03_02.php
        http://www.stcsig.org/usability/newsletter/0007-prototypingvisio.html

        However, if this is about an enhancement of an
        existing website, I would save a local copy of a
        webpage and modify the HTML directly to do the
        mock-up.

        Happy prototyping,
        Steven

        --- Deb <deborah@...> wrote:

        > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Graeme
        > Matthew" <scrum@c...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi all
        > >
        > > Can any of you recommend or relate to past
        > experience on user
        > interface requirements. In every role I have had the
        > client as always
        > recieved a mockup on how the web pages for the
        > application will look.
        > This is a very time consuming task and I sometimes
        > wonder if it causes
        > more hassle than its worth ...
        > > Graeme
        > >
        >
        > Not sure if this is what you are looking for: If you
        > can get the
        > customer to accept that look-and-feel is different
        > from functionality:
        > work out the details of functionality using very
        > simple tools.
        >
        > We did this interactively in our iteration planning
        > meeting with our
        > customers (admittetly, it was for Finance, not a
        > fancy Flash
        > websites!). Some of our favourite tools were 1)
        > Excel and 2) Alias
        > Sketchbook combined with i-Pen from Finger systems
        > (a mouse that
        > operates like a pen).
        >
        > Sketchbook allows you to capture a screenshot of
        > something similar or
        > related, cut it up, and mark it up. Along the lines
        > of: an arrow to
        > show "move this here" or a big X thru something
        > removed. Write on new
        > titles etc.
        >
        > Excel basically gives you a grid to work with that's
        > easy to
        > rearrange. It works well for tabular layouts.
        >
        > This allows you to walk thru UI funtionality
        > together (both tech and
        > customer) without distracting colours, fonts,
        > toolbars. This
        > discussion can yield subtle changes that otherwise
        > might not be caught
        > till later. It can also catch a design that looks
        > good but will cost
        > half as much with minor changes recommended by tech
        > folks. (But
        > perhaps you are doing these things already in your
        > current process).
        >
        > Our customers enjoyed seeing these sketches during
        > the demo, as
        > reminders of what they agreed to - being gestural,
        > they remember the
        > discussion better!
        >
        > You can address look-and-feel as a separate story,
        > without distraction
        > of features. It may be helpful to do this up
        > front... and be prepared
        > to adjust afterwards :-)
        >
        > deb
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >




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      • Graeme Matthew
        thanks for all your input much appreciated ... From: Deb To: Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 3, 2005
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          thanks for all your input much appreciated
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Deb" <deborah@...>
          To: <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, November 02, 2005 12:24 PM
          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Screenshot - Mock-up Recommendations


          > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Graeme Matthew" <scrum@c...>
          > wrote:
          >>
          >> Hi all
          >>
          >> Can any of you recommend or relate to past experience on user
          > interface requirements. In every role I have had the client as always
          > recieved a mockup on how the web pages for the application will look.
          > This is a very time consuming task and I sometimes wonder if it causes
          > more hassle than its worth ...
          >> Graeme
          >>
          >
          > Not sure if this is what you are looking for: If you can get the
          > customer to accept that look-and-feel is different from functionality:
          > work out the details of functionality using very simple tools.
          >
          > We did this interactively in our iteration planning meeting with our
          > customers (admittetly, it was for Finance, not a fancy Flash
          > websites!). Some of our favourite tools were 1) Excel and 2) Alias
          > Sketchbook combined with i-Pen from Finger systems (a mouse that
          > operates like a pen).
          >
          > Sketchbook allows you to capture a screenshot of something similar or
          > related, cut it up, and mark it up. Along the lines of: an arrow to
          > show "move this here" or a big X thru something removed. Write on new
          > titles etc.
          >
          > Excel basically gives you a grid to work with that's easy to
          > rearrange. It works well for tabular layouts.
          >
          > This allows you to walk thru UI funtionality together (both tech and
          > customer) without distracting colours, fonts, toolbars. This
          > discussion can yield subtle changes that otherwise might not be caught
          > till later. It can also catch a design that looks good but will cost
          > half as much with minor changes recommended by tech folks. (But
          > perhaps you are doing these things already in your current process).
          >
          > Our customers enjoyed seeing these sketches during the demo, as
          > reminders of what they agreed to - being gestural, they remember the
          > discussion better!
          >
          > You can address look-and-feel as a separate story, without distraction
          > of features. It may be helpful to do this up front... and be prepared
          > to adjust afterwards :-)
          >
          > deb
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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