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RE: [scrumdevelopment] Skill (was Re: Certified ScrumMaster)

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  • Alan Shalloway
    Lowell: I love your model except that I would say as a teacher you _can t_ stop at understanding because as you say, your impact would be limited. I am saying
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 4, 2003
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      Skill (was Re: Certified ScrumMaster)

      Lowell:
      I love your model except that I would say as a teacher you _can’t_ stop at understanding because as you say, your impact would be limited.  I am saying that practitioners must consider understanding while they consider practice as your model suggests.

       

      Alan Shalloway, Sr. Consultant, CEO
      office: 425-313-3065. mobile: 425-531-0810

      Net Objectives' vision is effective software development without suffering. Our mission is to assist software development teams in accomplishing this through a combination of training and mentoring.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Lowell Lindstrom [mailto:lindstrom@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 6:38 AM
      To: 'scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com'
      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Skill (was Re: Certified ScrumMaster)

       

      A learning model to consider:

      1. Information + Commentary  leads to Knowledge
      I can read a book or attend a lecture and speak intelligently about a subject.   This is good for sounding smart.

      2. Knowledge + Feedback leads to Understanding
      Through dialog, I compare my knowledge to others and develop a deeper understanding of the subject.   Courses and seminars can accomplish this.  With this I can teach.

      3. Understanding + Drive to use + Practice leads to SKILL
      Through practice I find out if I really know what I am talking about.  With skill, I can accomplish things.

      If you are a practictioner, skill is what you are after.  If you are a teacher, then perhaps you can stop at understanding, but you won't have much impact beyond the non-pratictioners.   Skill requires Knowledge, Understanding, Drive and Practice.  One is no more important than the other.  All are essential.

      ====================
      Lowell Lindstrom
      Object Mentor, Inc | www.objectmentor.com | 1-800-338-6716
      lindstrom@...

       

      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Shalloway" <alshall@n...> wrote:
      >
      > I still believe a deeper understanding is required before just jumping
      > in.  A transition to XP (going from 1 cycle to 2 or doing Scrum first
      > and then adding XP practices) often is a better step and help gains
      > understanding of the practices - adopting them as understanding
      > increases.
      >
      > Alan Shalloway, Sr. Consultant, CEO
      > office: 425-313-3065. mobile: 425-531-0810
      >
      > Net Objectives' vision is effective software development without
      > suffering. Our mission is to assist software development teams in
      > accomplishing this through a combination of training and mentoring.
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Ron Jeffries [mailto:ronjeffries@a...]
      > Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 3:25 AM
      > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Certified ScrumMaster
      >
      > On Tuesday, March 4, 2003, at 6:07:22 AM, Marco Abis wrote:
      >
      >

      >>I'm not saying that the practices are sufficient to gain

      > understanding. I'm
      >
      >>saying they are necessary.

      >
      >
      > ok, we are on the same wave on this (but I think everybody in this

      > list
      >
      > thinks it is necessary, am I right?) :)

      >
      > It's not clear, though I would hope so. I know that in the case of XP,
      > there are many cases of deciding important things about it without doing
      > the practices. An example brought up by Alan is pair programming.
      >
      > Pair programming has several important potential benefits, including
      > greater team flexibility, better code, higher reliability, and so on,
      > some
      > of which have begun to show up as experimental results, even on lab
      > rats,
      > er I mean students.
      >
      > However, pair programming has a dynamic effect on the team as well. Deep
      > intimate knowledge of the project is transmitted during the pairing
      > process. Not just how the code works, but who knows what, what the
      > domain
      > really is, the full richness of the project tapestry. Trust and common
      > purpose often grow more rapidly.
      >
      > It's easy to say, not having worked on a team that does full pairing,
      > that
      > it isn't important. Having worked on a fully-pairing team, it's
      > impossible
      > to forget the difference: it's intense and visceral.
      >
      > I don't know a way to communicate the value of pairing intellectually.
      > It's
      > not an intellectual thing. So people let pairing slide when they set up
      > their project, or even when they advise teams how to start projects. Of
      > course those teams can do just fine; pair programming isn't critical to
      > final success. Yet the same team, with pairing, might be so much more.
      >
      > How could they find out? There's only one way that I know of: Try it.
      >
      > Ron Jeffries
      > www.XProgramming.com
      > Sigs are like I Ching or Tarot. They don't mean anything,
      > but sometimes if you think about them you'll get a useful idea.
      >
      >
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