Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Agile Requirements Management

Expand Messages
  • Leydorf, Steven M.
    Hi. I am currently advising a small project that has a legacy system. They do not at this time have a requirements database. They are developing in an
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 9, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Agile Requirements Management

      Hi.

      I am currently advising a small project that has a legacy system.  They do not at this time have a requirements database.  They are developing in an iterative manner, with alot of customer input at each iteration.  For each iteration, the customer sits down with the team and reviews what they like and what they don't like -- alot of time as notes written on screen shots. They save customer notes as long as the project is active (i.e., when another project starts, they discard the old notes).

      I believe that I have good way to perform requirements definition and management. 

      On the other hand, it seems rather 'light' than what I'm used to. Does anyone have any comments on how I could/should shore up the requirements on the project?

      Thanks.

      Steve Leydorf


    • Mike Cohn
      I¹d recommend using a pen, rather than a pencil. :) Otherwise this sounds perfect to me. Regards, Mike Cohn Author of User Stories Applied for Agile
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 9, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Re: [scrumdevelopment] Agile Requirements Management I’d recommend using a pen, rather than a pencil. :)   Otherwise this sounds perfect to me.

        Regards,
        Mike Cohn
        Author of User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development
        www.mountaingoatsoftware.com




        On 9/9/05 10:39 AM, "Leydorf, Steven M." <steven.leydorf@...> wrote:

        Hi.

        I am currently advising a small project that has a legacy system.  They do not at this time have a requirements database.  They are developing in an iterative manner, with alot of customer input at each iteration.  For each iteration, the customer sits down with the team and reviews what they like and what they don't like -- alot of time as notes written on screen shots. They save customer notes as long as the project is active (i.e., when another project starts, they discard the old notes).

        I believe that I have good way to perform requirements definition and management.  

        On the other hand, it seems rather 'light' than what I'm used to. Does anyone have any comments on how I could/should shore up the requirements on the project?

        Thanks.

        Steve Leydorf



        To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
        To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...

          

         
         SPONSORED LINKS
                  
          Scrum <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Scrum&w1=Scrum&c=1&s=11&.sig=KvDTKhw7ncC9XbB25jdApQ>          
         
         

        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


         



      • Dr. Wolfgang J. Schneider
        Hi there, keep the notes - I blindly built test cases based on my notes just finding old acquaintances in the next project in the same industry. I also use
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 9, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi there,

          keep the notes - I blindly built test cases based on my notes just finding
          "old acquaintances" in the next project in the same industry. I also use
          them as horrifying examples in my seminars - just remove the customer's
          company name...
          Is especially good when you phase into the project, you will be the team
          with the highest bug detection rate in the beginning and be fairly "clean"
          some months later.

          Good luck

          Wolfgang

          Dr. Wolfgang J. Schneider
          w.schneider@... <mailto:w.schneider@...>
          Dr. Wolfgang J. Schneider GmbH

          Wolfsaugasse 9
          A-1200 Vienna
          Austria
          ________________________________

          From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leydorf, Steven M.
          Sent: Friday, September 09, 2005 18:40
          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Agile Requirements Management



          Hi.

          I am currently advising a small project that has a legacy system. They do
          not at this time have a requirements database. They are developing in an
          iterative manner, with alot of customer input at each iteration. For each
          iteration, the customer sits down with the team and reviews what they like
          and what they don't like -- alot of time as notes written on screen shots.
          They save customer notes as long as the project is active (i.e., when
          another project starts, they discard the old notes).

          I believe that I have good way to perform requirements definition and
          management.

          On the other hand, it seems rather 'light' than what I'm used to. Does
          anyone have any comments on how I could/should shore up the requirements on
          the project?

          Thanks.

          Steve Leydorf




          To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
          To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...




          SPONSORED LINKS
          Scrum
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Scrum&w1=Scrum&c=1&s=11&.sig=KvDTKhw7nc
          C9XbB25jdApQ>

          ________________________________

          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


          * Visit your group "scrumdevelopment
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scrumdevelopment> " on the web.

          * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>

          * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
          <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .


          ________________________________
        • Mike Dwyer
          Buy a box of manilla folders and a filing box. Put all the stuff from each iteration in a folder. Label it with some corporately acceptable acronym language.
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 12, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Agile Requirements Management

            Buy a box of manilla folders and a filing box.  Put all the stuff from each iteration in a folder.  Label it with some corporately acceptable acronym language.  Put it in the box along with all the other folders full of iteration stuff.  Mark the box neatly so that when the auditors come by you tell them where to go.

             

            Michael F. Dwyer

             

            "Planning constantly peers into the future for indications as to where a solution may emerge."

            "A Plan is a complex situation, adapting to an emerging solution." 

            -----Original Message-----
            From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leydorf, Steven M.
            Sent: Friday, September 09, 2005 12:40 PM
            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Agile Requirements Management

             

            Hi.

            I am currently advising a small project that has a legacy system.  They do not at this time have a requirements database.  They are developing in an iterative manner, with alot of customer input at each iteration.  For each iteration, the customer sits down with the team and reviews what they like and what they don't like -- alot of time as notes written on screen shots. They save customer notes as long as the project is active (i.e., when another project starts, they discard the old notes).

            I believe that I have good way to perform requirements definition and management. 

            On the other hand, it seems rather 'light' than what I'm used to. Does anyone have any comments on how I could/should shore up the requirements on the project?

            Thanks.

            Steve Leydorf



          • Ron Jeffries
            ... This is the part I like best ... telling the auditors where to go. Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com To follow the path: Look to the master; Follow the
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 12, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              On Monday, September 12, 2005, at 8:49:18 AM, Mike Dwyer wrote:

              > Mark the box neatly so that when the auditors come by you tell
              > them where to go.

              This is the part I like best ... telling the auditors where to go.

              Ron Jeffries
              www.XProgramming.com
              To follow the path:
              Look to the master; Follow the master; Walk with the master;
              See through the master; Become the master. -- Modern Zen Poem
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.