Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [scrumdevelopment] Digest Number 249

Expand Messages
  • Hal Macomber
    Scott, I am quite interested in daily status blogs. I ve been talking up p-logs among my colleagues for awhile. John Udell s article of a few years back got
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 9, 2003
    • 0 Attachment

      Scott,

      I am quite interested in daily status blogs.  I've been talking up p-logs among my colleagues for awhile.  John Udell's article of a few years back got me interested.  There are four things a p-log needs to do: (IMO)

      1. Tell and re-tell the story of the project.  That includes the major promises of the project and why those promises are important to the customer and other constituencies including the project team members.
      2. Key assessments of the project.  How it is going.  The challenges it faces.  And the opportunities for doing something previously not recognized.
      3. Specifically, record the issues and agreements we make with each other and how we are doing fulfilling those agreements.
      4. What we are learning.  What do we now know that we didn't know?  What are we able to do that we weren't able to do?  What could we be providing the customer that we hadn't forseen would be needed or be valuable.

      The p-log would have multiple authors.  One person might have revision rights.  One person might be assigned telling the story while another person moght post agreements.  Team members in general could make postings of other types along with comments to any posting.

      Classification of postings would make the p-log referenceable and a basis for cultivating learning.  The p-log would also support tracking the state of issues (open, closed, in progress, approved, disapproved, etc.).

      The p-log would be flexible to various forms of project delivery.  This group is interested in software development.  We can anticipate a variety of agile approaches along with heavyweight methodologies.  Construction and architecture has a variety of styles ranging from those that are highly collaborative to others that are top-down.  The p-log could support teams across these circumstances.

      The design should anticipate moblogging from the start.  The easiest thing to do is to post a photo with annotation or (brief) commentary.

      Finally, p-logs could be templates for other projects.

      What do others want from a p-log?

      Hal
      http://weblog.halmacomber.com/

      Date: Sun, 9 Feb 2003 12:51:05 +0800
      From: Scott Worley
      Subject: Re: Re: daily status blogs

      Hmm this is interesting, maybe I should think about creating some tools for this if there is enough requests, I will certainly do.

      What do you reckon, people, if there is enough feedback I will do and get this community to help me design it, maybe even set up a case study on scrum practice for this product for the community.

      please dump your comments either online here, or to my private account: zhangscott@... or worleys@...

      Scott Worley
      CTO
      Author: Inside ASP.NET, and a few others
      Speaker, Consultant and Enabler


      Subscribe to Reforming Project Management
      Enter your email address:

      Don't miss a posting! Forward to a friend.
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... Have you tried this, or talked to people who have? Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com If not now, when? -- The Talmud
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 9, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sunday, February 9, 2003, at 9:07:47 PM, Hal Macomber wrote:

        > I am quite interested in daily status blogs. I've been talking up p-logs among my
        > colleagues for awhile. John Udell's article of a few years back got me interested. There
        > are four things a p-log needs to do: (IMO)

        Have you tried this, or talked to people who have?

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        If not now, when? -- The Talmud
      • Andrew Gilmartin
        Traction by Traction Software [1] is a great project log tool. Udell has reviewed it [2]. The original design for the tool was as a true project log. Log
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 10, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Traction by Traction Software [1] is a great project log tool. Udell has
          reviewed it [2]. The original design for the tool was as a true project log.
          Log entries could be added via email or the web (with attachments). Log
          entries could be categorized on a paragraph by paragraph basis. Searches on
          a category only showed the relevant paragraph from the whole entry.
          Categorizations might be about content ("competion", "jabber"), or process
          ("bug:27","milestone"), or importance ("news"). The project log could then
          be displayed by content, ordered by date, and formatted according to
          importance. Current versions have very good integration with Microsoft
          Outlook.

          [1] http://www.tractionsoftware.com/
          [2] http://radio.weblogs.com/0100887/2002/07/19.html

          -- Andrew

          --
          Andrew Gilmartin
          US Engineering Team Leader
          andrew.gilmartin@...
          401-743-3713 (cell)
          andrewgilmartin (aim)
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.